ISRO to test plasma thrusters on GSAT-4

Discussion in 'Strategic Forces' started by RPK, Oct 1, 2009.

  1. RPK

    RPK Indyakudimahan Senior Member

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    fullstory

    ISRO develops tech to boost satellite life by 5 years

    Bangalore, Oct 1 (PTI) For the first time, India's space scientists have developed electric propulsion technology that is expected to boost the life of geostationary satellites by upto five years.

    In other words, the satellites which today have a lifespan of ten years, could last upto 15 years.

    The system - plasma thrusters - would be tested in GSAT-4 spacecraft slated to be launched on board GSLV later this year, ISRO chairman Madhavan Nair told PTI.

    "Electric propulsion is going to be a unique thing. It will be used in GSAT-4. This is a concept we are going to prove in this (GSAT-4). Once proven, it can be adopted as standard for future geostationary orbits", he said.

    So far, ISRO had been using chemical propulsion for station-keeping, altitude control, precision spacecraft control, stabilisation and orientation.
     
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  3. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    from praveen's post: some interesting tidbits

     
  4. ironman

    ironman Regular Member

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    Posted by vkthakur on Thursday, October 01, 2009 (EST)

    [​IMG]
    ISRO is poised to test a plasma thruster on board GSAT- 4 which is slated for launch in late December 2009. Photo Credit: ISRO​


    October 01, 2009, (Sawf News) - ISRO is poised to test a plasma thruster on board GSAT- 4 which is slated for launch in late December 2009.

    A plasma engine generates thrust by ionizing a propellant using electrical power and ejecting it from a nozzle. Conventional rocket engines generate thrust from the explosive combustion of a propellant and oxidizer.

    Plasma thrusters are characterized by lower thrust, higher efficiencies and sustained operation as compared to conventional rocket thrusters.

    ISRO hopes to use plasma thrusters to increase the lifespan of its satellites from ten to fifteen years.

    Plasma engines are also useful for long-distance Interplanetary space travel missions. The former Soviet Union first developed a plasma engine to propel its spacecraft to Mars in the early sixties.

    More recently ESA's SMART lunar probe, launched on September 27, 2003, used an ion engine as its primary propulsion system, the second spacecraft to do so after NASA's Deep Space 1 probe launched in October 1998.

    GSAT – 4 will be launched using GSLV-D3, a development version of GSLV Mark 2. The two-ton technology demonstrator satellite will feature a communication payload comprising multi-beam Ka-band pipe and regenerative transponder and navigation payload in C, L1 and L5 bands.

    The satellite will also carry a scientific payload, Tauvex, consisting of three ultra violet (UV) band telescopes developed by Tel Aviv University and Israel space agency for surveying a large part of the sky in the 1,400-3,200 angstrom wavelengths.

    Amidst the other new technologies to be tested on board GSAT – 4 are Bus Management Unit (BMU), miniaturized dynamically tuned gyros, 36 AH Lithium ion battery, 70 V bus for Ka-band and on board structural dynamic vibration beam accelerometer.

    GSAT-4 spacecraft will have a power generation capability of 2,500 watts and will be positioned at 82 degrees east longitude in a geo-stationary orbit, about 36,000 km above the earth.
     
  5. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

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    ISRO to test plasma thrusters on GSAT-4

    [​IMG]


    October 01, 2009, (Sawf News) - The ISRO is poised to test plasma thrusters on board the GSAT- 4 which is slated for launch in late December 2009.

    A plasma engine generates thrust by ionizing a propellant using electrical power and ejecting it from a nozzle. Conventional rocket engines generate thrust from the explosive combustion of a propellant and oxidizer.

    Plasma thrusters are characterized by lower thrust, higher efficiencies and sustained operation as compared to conventional rocket thrusters.

    ISRO hopes to use plasma thrusters to increase the lifespan of its satellites from ten to fifteen years.

    Plasma engines are also useful for long-distance Interplanetary space travel missions. The former Soviet Union first developed a plasma engine to propel its spacecraft to Mars in the early sixties.

    More recently ESA's SMART lunar probe, launched on September 27, 2003, used an ion engine as its primary propulsion system, the second spacecraft to do so after NASA's Deep Space 1 probe launched in October 1998.

    GSAT – 4 will be launched using GSLV-D3, a development version of GSLV Mark 2. The two-ton technology demonstrator satellite will feature a communication payload comprising multi-beam Ka-band pipe and regenerative transponder and navigation payload in C, L1 and L5 bands.

    The satellite will also carry a scientific payload, Tauvex, consisting of three ultra violet (UV) band telescopes developed by Tel Aviv University and Israel space agency for surveying a large part of the sky in the 1,400-3,200 angstrom wavelengths.

    Amidst the other new technologies to be tested on board GSAT – 4 are Bus Management Unit (BMU), miniaturized dynamically tuned gyros, 36 AH Lithium ion battery, 70 V bus for Ka-band and on board structural dynamic vibration beam accelerometer.

    GSAT-4 spacecraft will have a power generation capability of 2,500 watts and will be positioned at 82 degrees east longitude in a geo-stationary orbit, about 36,000 km above the earth.


    ISRO to test plasma thrusters on GSAT-4
     
  6. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

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    Thread panned to evince further discussion.

    I'd like any aeronautical engineers here to explain to us the mechanics behind plasma thrust.

    And I also plan to put scientific articles related to this development here.
     
  7. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Rage this is a great article plasma thrusters are being tested by USA for a future Mars mission, very cutting edge technology. Ion propulsion is also one of the future possibilities to open up the exploration of the solar system, currently used in deep space satellites.
     
  8. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    Absolutely agree, LF , this is really a cutting age technology and also shows the prowess of ISRO, wishing them very best.

    Regards
     
  9. shiv

    shiv Regular Member

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    where are the chinese on this?any chinese members,are you guys doing something like this?
     
  10. roma

    roma NRI in Europe Senior Member

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    Shiv-ji, when india does something great or even good , the chinese and also the BBC is suddenly absent
     
  11. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    ISRO develops tech to boost satellite life by five years | Deccan Chronicle

    ISRO develops tech to boost satellite life by five years


    For the first time, India's space scientists have developed electric propulsion technology that is expected to boost the life of geostationary satellites by upto five years.

    In other words, the satellites which today have a lifespan of ten years, could last upto 15 years.

    The system - plasma thrusters - would be tested in GSAT-4 spacecraft slated to be launched on board GSLV later this year, said Isro chairman Madhavan Nair.

    "Electric propulsion is going to be a unique thing. It will be used in GSAT-4. This is a concept we are going to prove in this (GSAT-4). Once proven, it can be adopted as standard for future geostationary orbits", he said.

    So far, Isro had been using chemical propulsion for station-keeping, altitude control, precision spacecraft control, stabilisation and orientation.

    With the use of electric propulsion, the life of the spacecraft can be enhanced, Nair, also Secretary in the Department of Space, said.

    "Today, most of the geostationary satellites' life is controlled by fuel availability. If it's going to be sustained for two-three years by electric propulsion and the remaining using chemical propulsion again.....so that way 15 years of life what we are targeting can be easily achieved. Right now, the satellite's life is 10 years", Nair said. Plasma thrusters (using xenol gas as propellants) provide high specific impulse and operate with low fuel consumption, an Isro scientist said.

    Isro spokesperson S. Satish termed electric propulsion "more efficient", while another scientist said that plasma thrusters would be extremely useful for inter-planetary missions.
     
  12. sandeepdg

    sandeepdg Senior Member Senior Member

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    Yeah, seems the Chinese' chickened out, since this way above their league !! :india:
    I think this technology will be very useful for our Mars mission in the near future.
     
  13. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    ISRO develops tech to boost satellite life by five years

    Oct 01 2009
    For the first time, India's space scientists have developed electric propulsion technology that is expected to boost the life of geostationary satellites by upto five years.

    In other words, the satellites which today have a lifespan of ten years, could last upto 15 years.

    The system - plasma thrusters - would be tested in GSAT-4 spacecraft slated to be launched on board GSLV later this year, said Isro chairman Madhavan Nair.

    "Electric propulsion is going to be a unique thing. It will be used in GSAT-4. This is a concept we are going to prove in this (GSAT-4). Once proven, it can be adopted as standard for future geostationary orbits", he said.

    So far, Isro had been using chemical propulsion for station-keeping, altitude control, precision spacecraft control, stabilisation and orientation.

    With the use of electric propulsion, the life of the spacecraft can be enhanced, Nair, also Secretary in the Department of Space, said.

    "Today, most of the geostationary satellites' life is controlled by fuel availability. If it's going to be sustained for two-three years by electric propulsion and the remaining using chemical propulsion again.....so that way 15 years of life what we are targeting can be easily achieved. Right now, the satellite's life is 10 years", Nair said. Plasma thrusters (using xenol gas as propellants) provide high specific impulse and operate with low fuel consumption, an Isro scientist said.

    Isro spokesperson S. Satish termed electric propulsion "more efficient", while another scientist said that plasma thrusters would be extremely useful for inter-planetary missions.
     
  14. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Plasma thrusters make use of a technology called Ion Propulsion. Here are some FAQs on Ion propulsion from NASA website

    A picture of ion propulsion mechanism

    [​IMG]

    More about Ion Propulsion/ Ion Thrusters

    Ion thruster - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     

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