Iran's Clenched fist aimed at Great Satan US loosens

Discussion in 'International Politics' started by Ray, Apr 4, 2015.

  1. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    It is a great victory for Obama in his fading days, but the Republicans, Israel, Russia and Saudi Arabia will be sorely disappointed.

    This will surely bring the heat down in international tensions. but could it lead to more given that the Republicans, Israel, Russians and Saudi Arabia will find fresh reasons to ratchet up their own strategic interests to suit their own political goals?
     
    sesha_maruthi27 likes this.
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  3. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Bringing Iran in from cold

    [​IMG]
    Iranian President Hassan Rouhani

    President Hassan Rouhani has emerged triumphant both at home and abroad, bringing Iran in from the cold by using his pragmatism to try and end crippling sanctions and decades of hostility with the West through detente and diplomacy.

    Iran and world powers reached a framework agreement yesterday on curbing Iran's nuclear programme for at least a decade, a step towards a final pact that could end 12 years of brinkmanship, threats and confrontation.

    If the deal results in a comprehensive agreement in June, Rouhani's popularity would grow even further, giving him the political capital to take on hardliners blocking his promises of political and social reforms in the Islamic Republic.


    A 66-year-old mid-ranking cleric who formerly served as Iran's top nuclear negotiator, Rouhani dismisses any suggestion that his pragmatism represents a betrayal of the Islamic Republic's founding precepts.

    "Moderation does not mean deviating from principles and it is not conservatism in the face of change and development," he said shortly after the surprise election defeat of his conservative rivals by a landslide in 2013.

    Rouhani also appeared to acknowledge that it would take time to fulfil his campaign promises. "Moderation ... is an active and patient approach in society in order to be distant from the abyss of extremism," he said.

    At home, the mild-mannered insider has as yet little to show for his pledge of a more transparent and tolerant administration; the political and civic restrictions that irk many Iranians remain stringent.

    The US noted in March 2015 that large numbers of prisoners are executed, including political activists and juveniles. Journalists are routinely imprisoned, and women and minorities face rights violations, the UN added. .

    Notably, two leading reformist politicians who contested the previous presidential elections in 2009 remain under house arrest. Their supporters turned out in force to elect Rouhani four years later, after he made an implicit pledge to free them and other political prisoners.

    A comprehensive deal in June could see the West lift the trade and financial sanctions that are strangling the economy in return for limits on its atomic work, which the West says may be aimed at building weapons but that Tehran says is for peaceful purposes.

    Progress has been possible in part because Rouhani has kept the confidence of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the so-called guardian of Iran's Islamic Revolution who has the final say on all matters of state, including foreign policy.
    Bringing Iran in from cold
     
  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Celebration mixes with caution

    Iran's President said today that a framework for a nuclear deal was just the first step towards building a new relationship with the world, after his countrymen greeted the announcement of the accord with celebrations in the streets.

    President Barack Obama also hailed an "historic understanding", although diplomats cautioned that hard work lies ahead to strike a final deal.

    The tentative agreement, struck yesterday after eight days of talks in Lausanne, Switzerland, clears the way for a settlement to allay western fears that Iran could build an atomic bomb, with economic sanctions on Tehran being lifted in return.


    It marks the most significant step towards rapprochement between Washington and Tehran since the 1979 Iranian revolution, and could potentially end decades of international isolation, with far reaching political consequences in West Asia.

    It also left Washington's closest regional ally Israel fuming, with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu declaring it could lead to nuclear proliferation, war and even his country's destruction.

    In a televised speech today, President Hassan Rouhani, a relative moderate elected in a landslide two years ago on a promise to reduce Iran's isolation, said the nuclear talks were just the start of a broader policy of opening up.

    "This is a first step towards productive interactions with the world," he said.

    "Today is a day that will remain in the historic memory of the Iranian nation," he added. "Some think that we must either fight the world or surrender to world powers. We say it is neither of those, there is a third way. We can have cooperation with the world."

    The deal still requires experts to work out difficult details before a June 30 deadline and diplomats noted that it could still collapse at any time before then.

    "We are not completely at the end of the road and the end of the road should be in June," said French foreign minister Laurent Fabius. "Nothing is signed until everything is signed, but things are going in the right direction."

    Netanyahu, who has the ear of Republicans who control both houses of the US Congress, said the powers negotiating with Iran must add a new demand that Tehran recognise Israel's right to exist. Israel believes Iran's goal is to destroy it.

    Under yesterday's terms, Iran would cut back its stockpiles of enriched uranium that could be used to make a nuclear bomb and dismantle most of the centrifuges it could use to make more. Intensive international inspections would prevent it from violating the terms in secret. Washington said the settlement would extend the "breakout time" needed for Iran to make a bomb to a full year, from 2-3 months now.

    For Iran, it would eventually lead to the end of sanctions that have cut the oil exports that underpin its economy by more than half over the past three years.

    Still, decades of hostility remain between countries that have referred to each other as "the Great Satan" and part of the "axis of evil". Obama and Rouhani, who both took risks to open the dialogue with secret talks two years ago, will each have to sell the deal to sceptical conservatives at home.

    Celebration mixes with caution
     
  5. sesha_maruthi27

    sesha_maruthi27 Senior Member Senior Member

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    I want to see what Israel does in the near future. Russia will be happy for time being....
     

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