Iran plans first manned mission to space by 2017

Discussion in 'West Asia & Africa' started by nrj, Aug 13, 2010.

  1. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    TEHRAN (BNS): Iran will launch the country’s first manned mission to space by 2017 despite sanctions by the West, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has said.

    "The plan is in line with an Iran space agency program to produce and place in orbit a spacecraft at an altitude of more than 35,000 kilometers," news agency IRNA quoted Ahmadinejad as saying.

    The country's growth and scientific breakthroughs in different areas are occurring despite the West's sanctions against the Islamic Republic; he was quoted as saying during a visit in the western Iranian city of Hamedan on Thursday.

    According to Iranian officials, in 2009 the country’s Aerospace Organization started a 12-year project to send an astronaut into space by 2021. However, the government after reviewing the space mission recently decided to launch a manned shuttle into space by 2019.

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  3. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

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    I doubt they will be able to gain that capability so soon.
     
  4. anoop_mig25

    anoop_mig25 Senior Member Senior Member

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    china took so many years, india still in planning stage. then how the hell iran is going to do it in 2019. Iran president is freaking mad
     
  5. pankaj nema

    pankaj nema Senior Member Senior Member

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    Iran depends on Imports of refined petroleum .It exports crude. Please first make some modern refineries
     
  6. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Though I doubt the iranian time line, but they have a good scientific pool. They have experience with rockets and their missile program is a testament to that fact. Don't discount their technical know how.
     
  7. Param

    Param Senior Member Senior Member

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    They would probably send a mam to space on a modified missile and leave him there.
     
  8. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

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    Yusuf Bhai Missile technology is ok but do they have most important Cryogenic engine technology with them for a shuttle? I dont think so. It took us so many years to get it .They are also from earth so don't think they are so brilliant.
     
  9. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Iran has foundation for Space ambitions -

     
  10. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Shash, I am not talking about their space program. I am talking about iran having a good scientific pool
     
  11. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Iran Launches Turtles Into Space, Plans Satellite Mission Soon

    [​IMG]
    Iran's Kavoshgar-3 Launches Toward Space

    Boldly taking turtles where few turtles have gone before, Iran launched its satellite carrier Kavoshgar-3 rocket skyward earlier today as part of the Islamic Republic's National Day of Space and Technology. The rocket was sans satellite for the test firing, but crewing the 10-foot launch vehicle were two turtles, a mouse, and a dozen or so worms.

    All right, the Soviets sent live tortoises into space a few times in the late '60s and '70s, including on a 1968 circumlunar flight that was the first to carry live animals into deep space. So this isn't the first time a member of the order Testudines has proven it has the Right Stuff. But by launching some of the smaller variety into space it appears Iran has achieved a "first," one of many the nation aims to notch in coming years.

    As part of Space and Technology Day, Iran also unveiled a new homegrown light booster rocket known as Simorgh that purportedly can carry a 220-pound satellite into orbit up 310 miles above the Earth. Three satellites were also revealed: Mesbah-2, Tolou and Navid-e-Elm-o-Sanat, the latter of which could benefit from a NASA-style acronym. But satellite launches aren't Iran's only aeronautical ambition; Iran wants to put a man into space before the decade is out, not because it is easy, but because frankly other nations are not leaping at the opportunity to aid Iran in its space ambitions.

    Both Italy and Russia have declined to launch Iranian satellites in the past, and Western governments bristled at today's launch as advanced rocketry isn't something the United States and her allies like to see in the hands of a diplomatically hostile state -- one that may or may not be enriching weapons grade uranium. Iranian authorities did not disclose the nature of the research or the purpose of launching live animals aboard the craft, nor did they disclose the time and place of the launch. The military-green surface-to-air missile truck that paraded the Kavoshgar-3 around to dramatic music prior to lift-off likely didn't help Iran's image either.



    But necessity is the mother of invention, they say, so we suppose it's good to see innovation coming out of any corner of Earth, as long as said innovation remains on a peaceful track. Though not usually compared to visionary leaders like JFK, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad stated publicly that he aims to send Iranian astronauts beyond earth orbit. Keep reaching for the stars.

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  12. pankaj nema

    pankaj nema Senior Member Senior Member

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    Making missiles is no big deal North korea also does it. .But a space programme is totally different thing
    First a country makes satellites, then launches satellites then DREAMS of manned space programme.

    The technological capability of Iran is limited.
    when sanctions will be imposed then refined petroluem will be one of the items because Iranian refineries are outdated. The technology required for manned space mission is far more complex than a modern refinery.

    Ahmedinijad and the current regime are misleading their people
     
  13. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Iran Developing Longer-Range Rocket

    Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad on Wednesday announced his country was developing a multistage rocket capable of flying roughly 620 miles to place a satellite in orbit, Agence France-Presse reported (see GSN, July 8).

    "The country's scientists are working on a three-stage rocket that will take us to 1,000 kilometers," state media quoted Ahmadinejad as saying. "Last time, we sent a satellite to 250 kilometers. ... Next year it will be sent to 700 kilometers, and the year after that to 1,000 kilometers."


    The Middle Eastern state put its first indigenously produced satellite into orbit in February 2009.

    "The rocket that we used for the first satellite had an engine thrust of 32 [metric] tons at the time of launch, but the rocket that we are building will have the thrust of 120 or 140 [metric] tons," the Iranian president said.

    Iran also intends to fire a new orbiter into space in the "near future," he said, describing the craft as an "experimental telecommunication satellite" with "a lifetime of one year." Iranian Communications Minister Reza Taghipour last month said the Middle Eastern nation would fire its Rasad 1 satellite into space in late August.

    Iran intends "within five or six years" to launch telecommunication satellites into space at orbits of around 22,000 miles, where they can maintain fixed positions over specific segments of the earth, Ahmadinejad noted (Agence France-Presse/Google News, Aug. 5).

    He said Iran would place its first astronauts in space by 2017, two years sooner than he stated previously, RIA Novosti reported (see GSN, July 26).

    "This project is another step towards the implementation of the Iranian Space Agency's program on the construction and launch of a spacecraft into (geostationary) orbit, which is more than 35,000 kilometers from Earth," he said, according to state media (RIA Novosti, Aug. 5).

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  14. Rahul Singh

    Rahul Singh Senior Member Senior Member

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    :emot15::emot15::emot15::emot15::emot15::emot15::emot15::emot15:

    Iranian missile technology is just like Pakistan "Painted in Iran Manufactured in China". BTW Sahab-1,2,3,4 or whatever, they are just medium range IRBMs much like A-2 and an A-2 type missile doesn't even make first step in space program, leave aside manned program.
     
  15. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    How world leaders view Iran's space ambitions

    Tehran claims to be joining the space race but the west has its suspicions

    The apparently successful launch of an Iranian satellite looks very different from Washington than it does from Tehran.

    For the Iranian government it is an important milestone along the road to reclaiming Persia's ancient claim to major power status, which it feels the jealous west is trying to deny it.

    It is also enormously significant in Iranian internal politics. President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad got elected promising economic benefits for the common man and modernisation. He has made a complete mess of the first part of that mission. Delivering the second is important for his prospects of re-election in June, in the eyes of both the average voter and – even more importantly, given the controlled nature of Iranian democracy – the supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

    From Washington, London and some other western capitals, the launch is seen primarily through the prism of Iran's nuclear project. The capacity to put an object into space, together with the feared capability to build a nuclear device, spells – for some at least – the eventual threat of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) that could reach the US.

    "There are dual applications for satellite launching technology in Iran's ballistic missile programme. As a result we think this sends the wrong signal to the international community, which has already passed five successive UN security council resolutions on Iran's nuclear and ballistic missile programmes," Bill Rammell, the minister of state at the Foreign Office, said today.

    For that reason the satellite launch has a direct and immediate bearing on the debate over the US missile defence scheme. Barack Obama's team has hinted the scheme could be reviewed. That hint brought immediate dividends in the relationship with Moscow, which felt threatened by the deployment of missile interceptors in Poland and a radar system in the Czech Republic. The Bush administration insisted the system was a shield against Iran; the Russians saw it pointing at them.

    The Russian government said that in return for Obama's change in tone it would review its own plans to put tactical missiles in its western enclave of Kaliningrad. The diplomatic thaw, which is only a week old, generated hopes of a more productive bilateral relationship. All that is now under greater threat as a result of the Omid satellite launch by Iran, if it pushes the missile defence argument back in favour of the hawks.

    Mark Fitzpatrick, a specialist on the Iranian nuclear programme at the International Institute for Strategic Studies, said: "It's almost as if the Iranians are in league with ballistic missile defence adherents in the United States."

    From a purely technical point of view, the advances represented by the satellite launch are incremental. The ballistic technology is basically the same as Iran's Shahab-3 missile, which was tested to great fanfare last year. That technology demonstrated Iran could reach Tel Aviv, Cairo or Riyadh with its missiles.

    The Omid satellite launch confirms that Iranian scientists have mastered the separation of payload from missile in space and placing a payload into the right orbit, both useful skills for an ICBM. It does not imply Iran is on the brink of targeting Washington with a nuclear warhead.

    "The Iranians have shown a very rudimentary capability in a technology that requires far greater sophistication," Christopher Pang, an analyst at the Royal United Services Institute, said.

    Fitzpatrick argues that a more significant missile test took place in November. The Sajjil missile launched then has about the same range as the Shahab-3, about 1,250 miles (2,000km), but it uses solid fuel rather than liquid. That is militarily significant because it is less volatile and can therefore be launched with shorter notice.

    The Iranians have certainly shown a lot of interest in projecting their military strength far beyond their region. However, they are probably still some way away from deploying long-range nuclear missiles.

    By this summer Iran will probably have produced enough low-enriched uranium to produce a bomb, if it was turned into highly enriched uranium (HEU). But that process would be hard to carry out without the UN's nuclear watchdog, the International Atomic Energy Agency, noticing.

    Then the HEU would have to be crafted into a warhead small enough to put on top of a missile. That too is very difficult. According to the most recent estimate by the US intelligence community, the Iranians gave up trying to do that in 2003.

    The Israelis have rubbished that estimate, and will be telling the Obama administration: "We told you so." The launch does not directly affect Israel, as Iran has already shown it can reach Tel Aviv with the Shahab-3 missile. But the Omid satellite launch will inject more anxiety and urgency into the international debate on Iran, at a time when the new US government is trying to create some breathing space with friendly overtures to Tehran.


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  16. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Iran launches first domestically produced satellite

    An year old satellite launch report -

    Iran today claimed it had broken into the global space race after launching the country's first domestically produced satellite into orbit, in a move that will intensify western fears over its missile capabilities.

    State television showed footage of the Omid (Hope) satellite being sent into space in a launch clearly timed to mark the 30th anniversary celebrations of the 1979 Islamic revolution.

    "In another achievement for Iranian scientists under sanctions, Iran launched its first homemade Omid satellite into orbit," an Iranian TV report said. "It was carried into orbit by Iran-made satellite carrier Safir."

    The reports said the Omid was equipped with experimental satellite control devices and power supply systems and was designed for gathering information and testing equipment.

    The Iranian president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, hailed the launch as a historic event aimed at "expanding monotheism, peace and justice". He said the satellite, which he claimed had telecommunications capabilities, had reached its orbit and had made contact with ground stations, although not all of its functions were active yet.

    The launch drew criticism from the Obama administration, with a White House spokesman expressing "acute concern".

    "Efforts to develop missile delivery capability, efforts that continue on an illicit nuclear program, or threats that Iran makes toward Israel, and its sponsorship of terror are of acute concern to this administration," the spokesman, Robert Gibbs, said.

    While Tehran insists the satellite will enable it to improve phone and internet technology and to track natural disasters, western analysts have warned that it would create the capacity to launch intercontinental ballistic missiles.

    Today's launch makes Iran the 11th country to put a satellite into orbit since the Soviet Union launched the first in 1957.


    It comes almost exactly a year after Iran launched the Kavosh-I (Explorer-1), a rocket capable of carrying satellites into space. That event, which also marked the opening of an Iranian space centre at an undisclosed desert location, was condemned as "unfortunate" by the US.

    It was followed by months of careful rehearsals for today's event, which included the launch of a dummy satellite last August and the firing of a second rocket, the Kavosh-2, into space in November.

    Iranian scientists have been working on a space programme for at least a decade. Early efforts involved co-operation with Russia. In October 2005, a Russian rocket launched Iran's first satellite, the Sina-1, which carried photographic and telecommunications equipment.

    The announcement of the Omid's launch comes as officials from the US, Russia, Britain, France, Germany and China are due to meet near Frankfurt tomorrw to talk about Iran's nuclear program.

    "Iran's satellite technology is for purely peaceful purposes and to meet the needs of the country," he said. "Satellites are a very essential means of gathering environmental data, climate data... and lots of necessary information that we need for technological, agricultural and economic projects," he said. "The difference between our country and some countries which have these capacities is that we believe science belongs to all humanity. Some people believe that advanced technologies belong to some countries exclusively.


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  17. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    if they have confidence then let them have try.................. lets see what they come up with.
     
  18. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Joint research projects with various countries: Head of Iranian Space Agency

    Iranian Space Agency and its goals with regard to three principles of dignity, wisdom and expediency is trying to field an effective international presence, is active and progressive.

    Doctor Mohammad Ali Forghani, Vice Minister and Head of Iran Space Agency, in dialogue with the public relations unit of News Iranian Space Agency also expressed in this article stated: Iran Space Agency and three levels of regional and international Framntqh their activities to follow.

    He added: "Accordingly, bilateral relations with various countries with regard to national interests in order to study joint projects and operations, in pursuing and enforceable. He noted: bilateral cooperation, extensive training and attendance at regional level consistently and actively in international organizations, other Iranian Space Agency plans for active presence in the international arena.

    Deputy Minister of Communications added: "Organization of Asia Pacific Space Cooperation (APSCO) that the founders of the Islamic Republic of Iran is considered one of the international organizations considered in this area is considered.

    He continued: interaction with the international community, such as Office space beyond the atmosphere and the presence of the UN Committee actively peaceful uses of space beyond the atmosphere and its two sub Vhqvqy Technical Committee, other programs developed in this section.

    Mohammad Ali Forghani in other programs this year, also said: "Another area that in addition to domestic efforts through interaction with international organizations to pursue the subject of space law.
    He stressed: "In this context, in addition to attending the international community and pursue the interests of the country, a large research project at two levels within the organization and working with local training centers will follow.


    Source: www.isa.ir
     
  19. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Right Sayasir. If not appreciate let not insult the Iranian ambitions. Lets see what comes out...
     
  20. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    nrj you and me both know what will be faith of there man flight but that celling of 35,000 kilometers is interesting how far is the fighter planes go (eg. Mig 25).

    If we are talking about what others US, Russia and China has done well with given past record of Iran and what it took others to go there it is highly unlikely but then 7 years is good time and Iran has $$$ from oil and many technical persons from Russia to help them.
     
  21. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    I will say if not 7, Iran will achieve it maybe in 14years. But this does not shadow their ambitions. Missing deadlines on space, defense projects is known to Indians much better than others. Iran has lot of co-operation from China & Russia. So they might succeed in near future....
     

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