Iran nuclear deal

Discussion in 'West Asia & Africa' started by Yusuf, Nov 24, 2013.

  1. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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  3. kseeker

    kseeker Retired

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    Iranian deal offers no relief to India on oil imports - The Times of India

    WASHINGTON: Countries like India would have to continue reducing oil imports from Iran despite a deal with the world powers over its controversial nuclear programme, according to a US fact sheet which also said Tehran would get a relief of $7 billion under the agreement.

    Under the agreement reached in Geneva, Iran has committed to halt enrichment above five per cent, neutralise its stockpile of near-20 per cent uranium and halt progress on its enrichment capacity, to halt progress on the growth of its 3.5 per cent stockpile and committed to no further advances of its activities at Arak and to halt progress on its plutonium track.

    In response, the US and five other major world powers have agreed to provide limited, temporary, targeted, and reversible relief while maintaining the vast bulk of the sanctions, including the oil, finance, and banking sanctions architecture.

    "If Iran fails to meet its commitments, we will revoke the relief," the US fact sheet said.

    "Sanctions affecting crude oil sales will continue to impose pressure on Iran's government. Working with our international partners, we have cut Iran's oil sales from 2.5 million barrels per day (bpd) in early 2012 to 1 million bpd today, denying Iran the ability to sell almost 1.5 million bpd," the fact sheet said.

    "That's a loss of more than $80 billion since the beginning of 2012 that Iran will never be able to recoup. Under this first step, the EU crude oil ban will remain in effect and Iran will be held to approximately 1 million bpd in sales, resulting in continuing lost sales worth an additional $4 billion per month, every month, going forward," it said.

    India has slashed import of crude oil from Iran by over 26.5 per cent in the financial year ended March 31 as US and European sanctions made it difficult to ship oil from the Persian Gulf nation.

    India imported about 13.3 million tonnes of crude oil from Iran in 2012-13 fiscal, down from 18.1 million tonnes shipped in the previous financial year.

    Oil sanctions alone will result in approximately $30 billion in lost revenues to Iran — or roughly $5 billion per month — compared to what Iran earned in a six month period in 2011, before these sanctions took effect.

    Iran used to be India's second-largest supplier, but is now fifth or sixth.
     
  4. kseeker

    kseeker Retired

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    US-Iran clinch interim nuclear deal: Blow to Israel and Saudi Arabia; relief for India - The Times of India

    WASHINGTON: The United States plus five world powers reached a landmark deal with Iran on Sunday to curtail the Persian country's purported march towards nuclear weapons.

    The agreement, when fully realized, has the potential to dramatically alter the geo-political landscape of the Middle-East, Gulf, and South Asia, affecting the strategic outlook and orientation of major countries from Israel to India and in between.

    Under the first phase of the agreement, clinched in a 3am signing ceremony in Geneva, Iran will stop enriching uranium beyond five per cent, effectively giving up the higher levels of enrichment needed to produce fissile material for nuclear weapons. It will also divert or convert its stockpile of 20 per cent enriched uranium into an oxide form so it cannot be used for military purposes.

    Iran will also not install any new centrifuges nor start up any that are not already in operation or build new enrichment facility, while submitting to daily international inspections that will make it almost impossible for it to work towards making nuclear weapons.

    In return, Iran will get to keep its existing centrifuges, be able to enrich uranium below five per cent for civilian nuclear uses, and receive relief from crippling US-led sanctions (including getting some revenues seized by past sanctions) for the next six months, during which a more detailed, longer term agreement will be negotiated.

    At a broader level, it will begin the process of recasting strategic alignments in the region. Untrusting Israel, haunted by an existential crisis that comes from a (mutual) pathological fear of a nuclear-armed rival, straightaway rejected the deal, suggesting US and its allies had been suckered by Teheran. Sunni-dominated Saudi Arabia, which fears its cozy equation with Washington being eclipsed by a Shia-dominated Iran returning to the US sphere of influence, also lashed out at the agreement.

    Nearer home, the US-Iranian detente provides an exit route for the United States from landlocked Afghanistan while reducing its dependence on extremist Pakistan, which is extracting a ransom for the 2014 drawdown from Afghanistan.

    It will also come as a big relief for India, which has had to do juggle and balance four aspects — its growing strategic partnership with the US, its strong military relationship with Israel, its economic and social investments in Afghanistan, and its civilizational ties with the Persian power. An Indian-built road from the Afghan border town of Zaranj to the Iranian port of Charbahar suddenly comes into play.

    Eventually, India may also be able to resume normal trade relations with Iran, which the US-led sanctions had put a crimp on.

    The US-led deal is interim in nature and there is much that can go wrong in the six months during which the concerned parties will negotiate a more comprehensive deal. For now though, both sides exulted on having broken new ground, and both claimed to have gained from the accord, effectively pointing to a win-win situation.

    "It is important that we all of us see the opportunity to end an unnecessary crisis and open new horizons based on respect, based on the rights of the Iranian people and removing any doubts about the exclusively peaceful nature of Iran's nuclear program," Iranian foreign minister Mohammed Javad Zarif, who played a key role in the talks, told reporters. "This is a process of attempting to restore confidence."

    President Obama, speaking from the State Dining Room in the White House, said diplomacy "opened up a new path toward a world that is more secure — a future in which we can verify that Iran's nuclear program is peaceful and that it cannot build a nuclear weapon."

    But disquiet and unease were evident in the reactions from Israel and Saudi Arabia, although Obama pledged that as negotiations go forward, US will retain steadfast in its commitments to "friends and allies — particularly Israel and our Gulf partners, who have good reason to be skeptical about Iran's intentions."

    That skepticism was aired openly. "What was concluded in Geneva last night is not a historic agreement, it's a historic mistake," Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu told reporters. "It's not made the world a safer place. Like the agreement with North Korea in 2005, this agreement has made the world a much more dangerous place."

    Netanyahu maintained that Iran would be "taking only cosmetic steps which it could reverse easily within a few weeks, and in return, sanctions that took years to put in place are going to be eased."

    But US interlocutors appeared confident that they had the lock on Iran's route to a nuclear weapon. "It will make our partners in the region safer. It will make our ally Israel safer," secretary of state John Kerry, who led the US-allied talks, said.
     
  5. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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    Iranian deal offers no relief to India on oil imports - The Times of India


    Same Company Different Writers
     
  6. kseeker

    kseeker Retired

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    That's right. 2 faces of a same coin.

    I also was in the same impression however, there's a subtle difference.....

    First news talks about setback on Oil imports however, second one talks about other possible things which will likely to benefit both India and Iran.

    Iranian deal offers no relief to India on oil imports

    US-Iran clinch interim nuclear deal: Blow to Israel and Saudi Arabia; relief for India
     
  7. mehrotraprince

    mehrotraprince Regular Member

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    Iran's Nuclear Deal: Who gains and who loses

    Winners

    ASIAN OIL CUSTOMERS: Sanctions on Iran's oil exports will remain in place during the six-month period covered by the deal, but world powers promise no new economic measures against Tehran as long as compliance moves ahead. This is good news for energy-hungry Asian economies such as India and China.

    DUBAI: Sanctions have sharply cut into the traditional trade and livelihood of many in the large Iranian expatriate community in Dubai. Anything that brings back Iranian business is welcome in Dubai.

    IRAN'S PRESIDENT: Rouhani often pitched the nuclear talks as a potential for a "win-win'' outcome with the West. On one level, he got his take by securing a deal that allows Iran to maintain uranium enrichment — although at lower levels.

    Losers

    ISRAEL: Many Israeli officials, including Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, see Iran's ability to enrich uranium as a recipe for potential disaster. Netanyahu must now try to weigh the significant risks of turning his back on the West and considering possible unilateral military options.

    SAUDI ARABIA: Saudi Arabia now sees the deal as favouring its regional rival and diminishing the Gulf role in US policy-shaping. It's unlikely, though, to stop the major Saudi military purchases from American defence contractors.

    EGYPT: The nuclear deal and the possibility of expanding US-Iran dialogue could cut into Egypt's traditional standing as the guiding force in shaping Western policy in the region.
     
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  8. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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    one more winner

    if Iran gets the Nuke Bomb within a week KSA also get the nukes from Pukkkistaaan


    Peace Loving world
     
  9. kseeker

    kseeker Retired

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    This so called Nuclear deal has been struck in the first place to make sure that, IRAN wouldn't get close to building their own Nukes !

    Now, where is the question of KSA getting their Nukes from Pukes ?

    In fact, ARABS and Jews are the winners here !
     
  10. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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    In a Light Note

    [​IMG]
     
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  11. dhananjay1

    dhananjay1 Regular Member

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    This deal would fall apart in few years if not earlier. The oil rich countries in the middle east would have to deal with superpowers one after another as they scramble to take control of rapidly declining oil reserves of the world. As the stress of increasing oil prices becomes evident worldwide, nobody would bother much to examine the validity of excuses to invade these countries.
     
  12. kseeker

    kseeker Retired

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    Iran nuclear deal may end cheap oil supply for India - The Times of India

    NEW DELHI: India's hopes to access cheaper oil after the US-led interim nuclear accord with Iran may prove a temporary advantage as the Persian Gulf nation emerges from isolation and begins demanding full dollar payments.

    The oil ministry's calculation that $8.5 billion can be saved if India imports an additional 11 million tonnes of Iranian crude might look feasible, but India's appeal as a customer will wane if the nuclear deal holds and sanctions ease.

    Though the deal faces formidable challenges with Saudi Arabia and Israel angrily rejecting it as "appeasement", and both Iran and the US not making irreversible commitments, India may have to game for an unshackled Iran.

    This might mean Iran's current need for allies and commercial partners and preparedness to accept rupee payments for its crude might change once it progressively emerges from a deep freeze of more than three decades.

    In the immediate run, India will be relieved that problems with re-insurance of Iran oil while shipping and refining can be addressed by the four-page agreement signed by Iran and a strict six-monthly monitoring of sanctions could ease.

    But the larger scenario where Iran reasserts itself in the Persian Gulf and becomes a factor from Afghanistan to Syria requires a more nuanced reading of India's options if US ties with Teheran do gather pace.

    Sources said India will need to balance relations with an emergent Iran looking to trade its nuclear programme for strategic dividends with its interests in Arab states that host an estimated seven million Indians pursuing their livelihoods.

    There is a convergence over the need to check the Taliban in Afghanistan, but as Iran seeks what it considers its rightful place in the world, Indian diplomacy will be tested as ancient rivalries acquire a new edge.

    Saudis view Tehran as a Shia power whose civilizational claims and technological progress, along with a large population, pose a threat in theological and strategic terms. The possibility of Iran becoming a major US investment unites the Saudis and Israel.

    India cannot see these faultlines as merely theoretical as the US is clearly tempted by not having to commit enormous resources in keeping Iran shackled and this clearly calls for a more innovative approach from New Delhi.

    The outlines of the accord that make it more difficult for Iran to weaponize its nuclear programme suit India's interest in not having another nuclear armed state in its neighbourhood.

    Iran will need much more time to make a device once it implements conditions like not enriching uranium beyond 5% and abandoning plans to reprocess plutonium and a build a heavy water reactor.
     
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  13. nrupatunga

    nrupatunga Senior Member Senior Member

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    Israeli Experts Dispute Netanyahu Snub of Iranian Nuke Deal
     
  14. nrupatunga

    nrupatunga Senior Member Senior Member

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    How European courts are dismantling sanctions on Iran
    So was there any surprise that a deal had to be reached?? Even if its a temporary one.
     
  15. nrupatunga

    nrupatunga Senior Member Senior Member

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    Haaretz - World powers to Israel: Stop griping, work with us toward final Iran deal
     
  16. kseeker

    kseeker Retired

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    Iran nuclear deal: Saudi Arabia warns it will strike out on its own - Telegraph

    Saudi Arabia claims they were kept in the dark by Western allies over Iran nuclear deal and says it will strike out on its own

    A senior advisor to the Saudi royal family has accused its Western allies of deceiving the oil rich kingdom in striking the nuclear accord with Iran and said Riyadh would follow an independent foreign policy.
    Nawaf Obaid told a think tank meeting in London that Saudi Arabia was determined to pursue its own foreign and policy goals. Having in the past been reactive to events, the leading Sunni Muslim nation was determined to be pro-active in future.
    Mr Obaid said that while Saudi Arabia knew that the US was talking directly to Iran through a channel in the Gulf state of Oman, Washington had not directly briefed its ally.
    "We were lied to, things were hidden from us," he said. "The problem is not with the deal struck in Geneva but how it was done."

    In a statement the Saudi government gave a cautious welcome to the Geneva nuclear deal. It said "good intentions" could lead to a comprehensive agreement on Tehran's atomic programme. "This agreement could be a first step towards a comprehensive solution for Iran's nuclear programme, if there are good intentions," the Saudi government said
    But it warned that a comprehensive solution should lead to the "removal of all weapons of mass destruction, especially nuclear, from the Middle East and the Gulf".
    A fellow of Harvard University's Belfer Centre and adviser to Prince Mohammad, the Saudi ambassador to London, Mr Obaid said Saudi Arabia would continue to resist Iranian involvement in the Syrian civil war. In particular he pointed to Iranian Revolutionary Guards involvement in battles in Syria on behalf of the regime.

    "[Saudi Arabia] will be there to stop them wherever they are in Arab countries," he said. "We cannot accept Revolutionary Guards running round Homs."
    Saudi Arabia's fury at the diplomatic detente with Iran is commonly held with Israel. While both countries are in the same posion Saudi Arabia disavows any suggestion of an open alliance. Until the Palestinians have a state, Saudi Arabia will not work with Israel.
    Saudi Arabia is increasingly at odds with Washington over Syria. It rejected a seat on the UN Security Council in protest at the body's failure to "save" Syria.
    Qatar is the latest Gulf Arab state to welcome the nuclear deal between Iran and world powers, calling it a step toward greater stability in the region.
    Saudi Arabia, has previously expressed unease about US overtures to Iran. The dialogue helped pushed along efforts by Washington and others to strike a deal with Iran seeking to ease Western concerns that Tehran could move toward nuclear weapons.
    Qatar's Foreign Ministry said the deal is an "important step toward safeguarding peace and stability in the region".
    Bahrain, Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates have issued similar statements.
     
  17. kseeker

    kseeker Retired

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    Geneva nuclear success impacts Saudi-Iran ties - The Hindu

    - ATUL ANEJA

    The success of nuclear talks in Geneva have triggered the first signs of a possible de-escalation of tensions between Iran and Saudi Arabia, whose regional rivalry has acquired a sharp sectarian edge in recent years.

    In their first official remarks after Iran and the six global powers signed a nuclear deal in the early hours on Sunday, Saudi authorities signaled that a potential opportunity had been created to improve regional security. “If there is goodwill, then this agreement could be an initial step toward reaching a comprehensive solution to Iran's nuclear programme,” said that Saudi Cabinet in a statement.

    The Saudis also hoped that the Geneva agreement would lead to the removal of weapons of mass destruction, especially nuclear weapons, from West Asia—a veiled reference to Israel—as well as the Gulf region, which includes Iran.

    The cautious welcome accorded to the Geneva deal, marks a significant shift, at least on paper, from previous positions adopted by Saudi officials, who had expressed deep reservations, if not hostility, to a possible thaw in ties between Iran and the West.

    As the talks in the Swiss city were underway, Saudi ambassador to Britain, Mohammed bin Nawaf bin Abdulaziz, warned that the Kingdom would not “sit idly by” if world powers failed to halt Iran’s nuclear programme. In an interview last Friday with the British daily, The Times, Prince Mohammed also called Washington’s perceived “rush” to engage with Tehran “incomprehensible”.

    “Appeasement hasn’t worked in the past, and I don’t think it will work in the 21st century,” he was quoted as saying.

    Some analysts say that rivalry between Iran and Saudi Arabia escalated following Iran’s growing influence in Iraq and Lebanon—two countries with a majority Shia population, as well as Syria, where the majority is Sunni, but the leadership is Alawite; a Shia offshoot. Saudi Arabia and Qatar have openly supported the armed opposition against the government of President Bashar Al-Assad that is heavily backed by Tehran.

    In Iran, the country’s foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif has reached out to his oil-rich Gulf neighbours, including Saudi Arabia—his initiative adroitly timed with the commencement of the Geneva conference. In an opinion piece that appeared in the Saudi owned Asharq Al-Awsat, Mr. Zarif sought to reassure “friends in our immediate neighbourhood” that the resolution of the nuclear issue was not being “pursued at their expense”. The minister added: “We recognise that we cannot promote our interests at the expense of others. This is particularly the case in relation to counterparts so close to us that their security and stability are intertwined with ours. Thus, notwithstanding the focus on our interactions with the West, the reality is that our primary foreign policy priority is our region.”

    The minister proposed establishment of a formal structure, functioning under the United Nations system that would bring together eight littoral countries of the Gulf region working on a common and expanding agenda. “The challenges and opportunities that we face are enormous. They range from environmental degradation to sectarian tension, from extremism and terrorism to arms control and disarmament, and from tourism and economic and cultural cooperation to confidence-building and security-enhancing measures.”

    Beyond the political, the fall-out of Geneva accord, which includes the partial lifting of sanctions, has begun to spark some commercial activity in Iran. Bloomberg is reporting that Iranian rial has gained almost 4 percent against the dollar in the unregulated market since the deal was signed early on November 24. Hossein Ghazavi, a former Iranian deputy central bank governor, was quoted as saying that the agreement would “provide international and regional financial institutions a freer hand to consider more finance for projects and trade in Iran”
     
  18. nrupatunga

    nrupatunga Senior Member Senior Member

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    Is iran getting under the deal saying its not installing but doing RnD??

    Iran presses ahead with uranium enrichment technology
     
  19. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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    looks like They Blaming

    as of the Deal all the Installations should be Halted and Observed by the IAEA officials

    They need a Nuke Reactor to test the Radiation materials ..where Arak is exists but It's on the list to Halt the Construction


    I know that was a Worse deal and Iran Shouldn't Believable
     
  20. nrupatunga

    nrupatunga Senior Member Senior Member

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    Sir ji, i am aware of your feelings towards israel. But from an indian pov, india should not "accept" a nuclear iran, but somewhere i feel if inda has to put up with 2 hostile nuclear neighbors however much it may not want that (i.e. nuclear iran) it may very well "go along" with a 3rd one in the near-by region.

    So maybe as usa might agree to work with iran(see this post), maybe we also need to be pragmatic and look for ways to work with iran.
     
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  21. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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    Thanks ..

    Who Knows Obama's Plan ..some of them Told me He give the Last Chance to Iran to Shut down the Nuke Programs .Because of Possible Escalations of Israeli KSA military
     

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