Iran lashes out at Russia for missile deal

Discussion in 'Strategic Forces' started by LETHALFORCE, Nov 10, 2010.

  1. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Iran_lashes_out_at_Russia_for_missile_deal_999.html

    Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has lashed out Russia accusing it of "selling out" his country to the United States for scrapping a missile deal.

    The Kremlin called off the deal last in September citing U.N. sanctions against the Islamic republic over its controversial nuclear program.

    "Some people who are under the influence of [the United States] thought that if they unilaterally and illegally cancel some defense agreements that they have with us, it will hurt the Iranian nation," Ahmadinejad said in reference to the missile deal between Moscow and Tehran.

    "I want to tell them on your behalf that we consider the deal to still be valid. They should execute it. If they don't, the Iranian people will seek its rights, the losses and the fines on it," he said, cheered on by crowds at a public rally in the northeast city of Bojnourd.

    The remarks were Ahmadinejad's first direct reaction to Moscow's decision to cancel the delivery of the S-300 missiles.

    Western analysts and officials have long feared that Tehran could reverse engineer the system, turning into an offensive weapon.

    Russia scrapped the deal clearly caving into international pressure, five years after the deal had been agreed to with Iran.

    It remains unclear how the Islamic republic will proceed and what further action it will take against Russia. Senior military and technology officials have hinted that the Kremlin was preparing to reimburse Iran for the canceled deal.

    Military analysts have said that deployment of the S-300 missile system would have created problems in any potential war designs against Iran.

    The United States and Israel opposed the sale of the system, which can destroy multiple aircraft and missiles at a range of about 100 miles and altitudes of up to 20 miles. It is able to simultaneously track up to 100 targets.

    Washington and some of its allies, including Israel, suspect Iran's civil nuclear energy program is a cover for a secret effort to develop weapons. Iran, though, has repeatedly rebuffed the accusation saying it only wants to enrich uranium to the lower levels used in producing fuel for power plants.

    At the public rally, Ahmadinejad said Iran had the capability to defend itself without the S-300 missile system.

    "The Iranian nation will stand firm in the face of arrogance, for example the U.S. government. The Iranian people do not need missiles to defend themselves," he said.
     
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  3. wild goose

    wild goose Regular Member

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    Iran says ready to test domestic air defense system similar to S-300



    Iran is set to test-fire a domestically-designed air defense system similar to the Russian S-300 after Russia refused to fulfill a delivery contract, the IRNA news agency said on Wednesday.

    Russia signed a deal to deliver five battalions of S-300PMU-1 air defense systems to Iran in 2007 but banned the sale in September, saying the systems, along with a number of other weapons, were covered by the fourth round of sanctions imposed by the UN Security Council against Iran over its nuclear program in June.

    "We had plans to purchase the S-300 from Russia as part of our agenda to meet some of our security needs, but under pressure from the United States and Israel, [Russia] refrained from delivering the defense system to our country," Brig. Gen. Mohammad Hassan Mansourian said.

    "[Missile defense] systems similar to S-300 will soon undergo test firing and field modification while other long-range systems are also being designed and developed," Mansourian said.

    The general also said Iran's air defenses would soon be strengthened with a new generation of Mersad and Shahin missiles.

    The advanced version of the S-300 missile system, called S-300PMU1, has a range of over 150 kilometers (over 100 miles) and can intercept ballistic missiles and aircraft at low and high altitudes, making it an effective tool for warding off possible air strikes.

    Russia has delivered 29 Tor-M1 short-range air defense missile systems to Iran under a $700-million contract signed in late 2005. Russia has also trained Iranian Tor-M1 specialists, including radar operators and crew commanders. The S-300 system is significantly superior to the Tor-M1.


    http://dailyairforce.com/428/Iran-s...estic-air-defense-system-similar-to-S300.html
     
  4. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Iran_successfully_test_fires_upgraded_Soviet-era_missile_999.html

    Iran 'successfully' test fires upgraded Soviet-era missile

    Iran has "successfully" test fired an upgraded version of a Soviet-era missile, a commander said in a report on Thursday, after Moscow dropped plans to supply Tehran with S-300 missiles.

    The website of Iran's English-language Press TV reported that the Islamic republic had "designed an air defence system that has the same capability as the Russian-made S-300 system."

    "We have developed the system by upgrading systems like the S-200, and we have tested it successfully using all our potential and experience in the Islamic Revolution Guards Corps (IRGC), the Army and the Defence Ministry," it quoted Brigadier General Mohammad Hassan Mansourian, the deputy commander in the Iran's air defence unit, as saying.

    It was unclear from the report about the nature of the test, and whether it was carried out during ongoing aerial defence war games.

    Last week Mansourian had told the state news agency IRNA that "very soon we will test long-range aerial defence missiles, including Iranian S-300s."

    Iran's military has long touted its intentions to come up with a long-range anti-aircraft missile system comparable to the S-300, after Moscow's refusal to deliver that system because of UN sanctions against Tehran over its nuclear drive.

    "Long-range threats comprised some 20 percent of threats against the nation, and we have developed solutions for it, including an improvement of the S-200 system," Mansourian was quoted as telling IRNA on Wednesday.

    The S-300 is a ground-to-air missile system of medium and high altitude and with a long-range capability (up to 150 kilometres, 90 miles), according to specialised military and aeronautics websites.

    It was developed by Russia in the 1980s to intercept multiple targets, aircraft or missiles, like the US Patriot system.

    The S-300 is the next generation of the S-200, which uses technology that dates back to the 1960s. Tehran purchased S-200s from the former Soviet Union in the 1980s.

    Russian President Dmitry Medvedev signed a decree in September banning supplies of S-300 missiles and other arms to Iran, citing UN Security Council Resolution 1929.

    Moscow came under strong US and Israeli pressure not to go ahead with the sale of the weapons system which was seen as complicating any military action against Iran over its nuclear programme.

    Both Israel and the United States have refused to rule out resorting to military action to prevent Iran acquiring what they suspect is nuclear weapons capability, an ambition Tehran strongly denies.

    Top Iranian officials, including President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, have lashed out at Russia for "selling out" to the United States by cancelling the S-300 deal.

    Moscow, which has been a strong ally of Iran and built the Islamic republic's first nuclear power plant in the southern city of Bushehr, said it would reimburse Tehran for its downpayments on the deal.

    The contract was estimated to be worth a total of 800 million dollars (572 million euros).

    Ahmadinejad was to meet Medvedev later on Thursday on the sidelines of a regional summit in the Azerbaijani capital Baku.
     
  5. Indianrabbit

    Indianrabbit Regular Member

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    Russia had to comply with geo politics of the world, until it gets strong again.
     
  6. wild goose

    wild goose Regular Member

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    Iran Tests Anti-Cruise Tor-M1 Air Defense System


    "During the wargames, other optimized and upgraded weapons for targeting Cruise missiles as well as Tor-M1 and heavy fire power artillery systems have been test-fired and assessed," one of the commanders of IRGC Aerospace Force General Ezatollah Beigi told FNA.

    The Tor-M1 is a short range, mobile air defense system intended for engagement of fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft, UAVs, and cruise missiles flying between medium and very low altitudes even in severe countermeasures environments.

    Beigi added that the IRGC's Aerospace Force has made a wide use of the necessary techniques and equipments to get prepared for defending the country against any potential Cruise attack.

    "We also have the needed systems and equipment for identifying, tracing and intercepting Cruise attacks," he said, adding, "And these systems have been tested in the wargames."

    In May 2010, Iran inaugurated production line of a powerful missile defense shield to destroy incoming cruise missiles.

    "Mesbah (Lantern) 1 air-defense system is designed and built to counter air attacks, different kinds of airplanes, cruise missiles, choppers and other air threats in low altitudes," Iranian Defense Minister Brigadier General Ahmad Vahidi said at the time.

    "The defense system has been designed on the basis of increasing the volume of fire and controlling it by a reliable system," Vahidi added.

    Meantime, Commander of Khatam ol-Anbia Air Defense Base Brigadier General Ahmad Miqani told reporters on Saturday that Iran's anti-Cruise missile systems used to be deployed in a limited number of sites in the past, but Tehran has now deployed these systems all throughout the country at present.

    He also said Iranian experts have succeeded in identifying the weak points of Cruise missiles

    http://dailyairforce.com/443/Iran-Tests-AntiCruise-TorM1-Air-Defense-System.html
     

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