introduction to myself

Discussion in 'Introductions & Greetings' started by anupam2013, Apr 12, 2013.

  1. anupam2013

    anupam2013 New Member

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    hii, myself anupam rakshit presently working in ITC india pvt.ltd. as a technical laboratory control assistant..it has been my fascination to be a part of the indian defence service since i came to know the thrilling challenging & disciplined life along with the sense of pride & honor for the uniform that has to be put on here..its very unfortunate for me i have not been able to seat for the CDS exam when i was within 25..the reason is very obvious and practical..but now i am getting ready to appear before SSB board to join as an officer in the territorial army..its the only way left for me now to meet my dream as i am now 26+...if an appropriate body help me to know how can i join our main regular army from the territorial army, i will b ever thankful to him/her..
     
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  3. Ankit Purohit

    Ankit Purohit Senior Member Senior Member

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    welcome mate, I am also Preparing for TA
     
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  4. mikhail

    mikhail Senior Member Senior Member

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    welcome to DFI mate:welcome:!hope you'll have a great time in this forum.
    btw office kothay tomar,Sector-V e bujhi?
     
  5. bose

    bose Senior Member Senior Member

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    Welcome to the forum... and best of luck to you...
     
  6. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Welcome to the forum and good luck.
     
  7. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

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    I dont think there are any such ways, Are you a regular in TA or part time.. ?

     
  8. ghost

    ghost Regular Member

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    hi i am new here can someone please tell me how to start a new thread
     
  9. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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    Click the Post new Thread and Post about your Introduction


    [​IMG]



    And Request to Mods and Admins ..Shall we Open a Mega thread only for New Members Introduction.
     
  10. arnabmit

    arnabmit Homo Communis Indus Senior Member

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    Welcome! Please introduce yourself.

    Click on the "Forum" button at the top of this page (between "Home" & "Opinion") >> Scroll down to the "Community" section >> Click on "Introductions & Greetings" >> Click on the "Post New Thread" button.
     
  11. ghost

    ghost Regular Member

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    thanks to both of you but i am not able to see any option of starting new thread where you have stated its not about introducing myself but about indo china war.
     
  12. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Welcome.

    Since you walk, you must be Phantom - the Ghost who walks!
     
  13. ghost

    ghost Regular Member

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    Now it is the time of night
    That the graves, all gaping wide,
    Every one lets forth his sprite
    In the church-way paths to glide
     
  14. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Blue Dementia

    by Yusef Komunyakaa

    In the days when a man
    would hold a swarm of words
    inside his belly, nestled
    against his spleen, singing.

    In the days of night riders
    when life tongued a reed
    till blues & sorrow song
    called out of the deep night:
    Another man done gone.
    Another man done gone.

    In the days when one could lose oneself
    all up inside love that way,
    & then moan on the bone
    till the gods cried out in someone's sleep.

    Today,
    already I've seen three dark-skinned men
    discussing the weather with demons
    & angels, gazing up at the clouds
    & squinting down into iron grates
    along the fast streets of luminous encounters.

    I double-check my reflection in plate glass
    & wonder, Am I passing another
    Lucky Thompson or Marion Brown
    cornered by a blue dementia,
    another dark-skinned man
    who woke up dreaming one morning
    & then walked out of himself
    dreaming? Did this one dare
    to step on a crack in the sidewalk,
    to turn a midnight corner & never come back
    whole, or did he try to stare down a look
    that shoved a blade into his heart?
    I mean, I also know something
    about night riders & catgut. Yeah,
    honey, I know something about talking with ghosts.
    - See more at: Blue Dementia- Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More
     
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  15. Kyubi

    Kyubi Regular Member

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    Welcome :namaste: enjoy your stay here, there are some amazing people in this forum from whom you can learn a lot and also take part in crucial discussions. So Sit back and relax enjoy some good reads which you will find in plenty here at this forum.

    On another note it is possible to join the Indian Army next year provided you don't turn 27 by the time the TGC ( Technical Graduate Course ) commences, just keep refering to Employment News and indian army career website.
     
  16. arnabmit

    arnabmit Homo Communis Indus Senior Member

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    There have been some recent flood of spam here, maybe posting rights have been limited to new members.

    @LurkerBaba @Yusuf @Singh @civfanatic @Daredevil

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  17. ghost

    ghost Regular Member

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    in that case start any one start new thread with title "must read " and this link...................:mad::mad: new members are not allowed to start new thread not allowed to post link what else "NOT ALLOWED"
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  18. ghost

    ghost Regular Member

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    ‘Nobody believed we had killed so many Chinese at Rezang La. Our commander called me crazy and warned that I could be court-martialled’ – at Rezang La 114 indian Jawans killed 1400 chinese soldiers !
    4 Replies
    Image

    Honorary capt.Ramchander Yadav n Havaldar NihalSingh,2 of 6 survivors who fought at RezangLa at 16000ft,1962 .

    It’s sad that any time we talk about the India-China war of 1962, horrible words like debacle, disgrace, disaster come to our minds. This is the 50th anniversary of that war. It’s a war that this country ideally would love to forget but cannot because it’s etched in our memories as one of the saddest chapters of our independent history. And it’s sadder still that because of that overwhelming sense of failure in that war, we tend to sometimes almost deliberately ignore the one chapter that I think is without parallel in modern post Second World War military history, the battle of Rezang La on November 18, 1962. I will give you a brief history. Charlie Company of a battalion called 13 Kumaon was divided in several platoons on one ridge of two kilometres, protecting the airfield of Chushul which was vital if India was to hold Ladakh. It was attacked on the morning of November 18 by maybe 5,000-6,000 Chinese with heavy artillery support. A crest behind this ridge prevented Indian artillery from being able to support these jawans. And what did these jawans do? They fought to last man, last round. That’s an expression you hear in movies and read in war comics, but that is something that actually happened in the battle of Rezang La. Of the 120 men and officers of this Company, 114 died, five were taken prisoners as wounded—they all escaped—and one was sent back to tell the story of the battle to the rest of the world. And who sent him back? This Company’s most remarkable commander, Major Shaitan Singh, who got a Param Vir Chakra for leading this battle. I am today in Rewari, the area from where these jawans came… It was a Kumaon battalion but this was an Ahir Company from Rewari in Haryana. With me are two of those six survivors—in fact, only four remain with us now—Honorary captain Ramchander Yadav and Havaldar Nihal Singh. So both of you were with Major Shaitan Singh?

    Yadav: I was his radio man.

    Singh: And I was his personal guard with the light machine gun (LMG).

    And you saw the whole war?

    Singh: I cannot sleep when those scenes come to my mind. It has been 50 years, yet it seems the war has just taken place.

    You were handling LMG for the company commander’s protection. After you were hit by bullets, did you stop firing?

    Singh: I disassembled the LMG and threw it so that the enemy could not use it. I was in terrible pain. My body was still. After some time, they pulled me out from the bunker. They asked my name in English. They asked for the names of my Commanding Officer and Brigade Commander. I said no. And then they asked me to go for first aid by communicating in sign language.

    You were at 18,000 ft and there was snowfall?

    Yadav and Singh: Yes, and the wind was very cold.

    Singh: They took me to their post around 5 p.m. I could see their artillery on the other side of the ditch. I thought of running but waited.

    How did you escape from their custody?

    Singh: The soldiers who took me in custody were walking around and talking. By then it became dark and it occurred to me that I should run. I slowly sneaked out from there. When I walked almost 500 metres, they fired three shots in the air.

    You went back to the headquarters?

    Singh: Yes, on November 19, around 1 p.m., I reached the headquarters. On November 22, we were admitted to a hospital in Jammu where we were treated.

    Yadav saab, you were specially sent back so that others may know the story of the war.

    Yadav: Yes, that was the motive of Major saab.

    Major Shaitan Singh was not from Rewari. He was from Rajasthan.

    Yadav: He was from Rajasthan. He was a Rajput. His name was Shaitan Singh but he was god.

    Please describe the scene of that day. The attack started at 3:30 a.m.?

    Yadav: I was a sepoy in Charlie Company of 13 Kumaon Regiment and was with the Major at Rezang La post. At 3:30 am, firing took place at the section of Naik Gulab Singh, who later got the Vir Chakra.

    This one Company had one Param Vir Chakra, five Vir Chakras, and four Sena medals, including you. Medals were rarely awarded those days, still so many were given. What happened after that?

    Yadav: We got alerts. When my officer asked, I said Platoon No 8 had informed that the enemy had attacked. The enemy was trying to climb but the LMG of Hukam Chand (Vir Chakra) killed four. After 10 minutes, Platoon 7 informed me about the attack on them. I asked Surja Ram (Vir Chakra) how things were. He said they had taken their positions and that 400 people were trying to climb from 14,000 ft to 18,000 ft.

    All the names of your comrades are written on the memorial here in Rewari. The list here says that 114 jawans killed 1,300 Chinese enemies that day.

    Yadav: I saw that with my own eyes. Bodies were lying all around.

    So when you knew that thousands of Chinese were coming, that they had artillery support while your artillery wouldn’t reach you because of the huge mountain behind you, was it evident that you had to stay put?

    Yadav: Yes, there was no going back then.

    Did anyone think of saving their own lives, withdrawing? What did the Major tell you?

    Yadav: The Major said if we have to withdraw, then do it. But the jawans and the JCOs said we will not leave Rezang La. We have the blessings of Lord Krishna. The Major said I am with you and I am a Yadav too, so what if my name is Bhati?

    What happened next? Where were you and the Major when the fire came?

    Yadav: I was at the command post with platoons on either side on the two-kilometre ridge. I was with the Major. After a while, a message came from Platoon No 8. Hari Ram (Vir Chakra) said the enemy was coming through the ridge, but we would kill them once they are in range. They repulsed that attack.

    Many Chinese died. Did you see their bodies?

    Yadav: Yes. They were lying scattered like berries in a market. They kept climbing up, and we were at our post. Two attacks were repulsed. Then, Platoon 7 was attacked. They didn’t attack Platoon 9 even though it was at the front. Their plan was to isolate Platoon 9. But they didn’t know that our commander had made arrangements so that no one could climb up.

    So you had made a killing ground?

    Yadav: Yes, the third and fourth attacks on Platoon 8 were also repulsed. Then they attacked with full force. That’s when Surja Ram declared, Ramchander, now is the time when we will all fight out of our posts in the name of hand-to-hand combat. My communication with Platoon 7 stopped. Communication started with Platoon 8 when 14-15 yaks and around 700 Chinese took position on the ridge in between us and Platoon 8.

    They came from behind?

    Yadav: Yes, first we thought it was our battalion’s Alpha Company that had come to help us. We thought the CO might have sent them for our help but when they started positioning their yaks and machine guns, then Havaldar Major Harphool Singh said this is the enemy. After that, the Major ordered for nine platoons to be sent from the headquarters. Since the enemy was going to attack Platoon 8, we would attack them from behind and they would be trapped between Platoon 8 and us and we would finish them.

    So you saw many of your colleagues being martyred before your eyes, bayonets in hand, in hand-to-hand combat?

    Yadav: Yes, I saw some like (Naik) Singh Ram (Vir Chakra) catching hold of their heads and smashing them together. What he did to the Chinese earned him their respect. Before the Chinese left, they sank a bayonet in the ground near his head, and put a helmet on top. They gave him izzat, samman, they kept a note there. We have seen that note.

    Singh: If Major saab (Maj Shaitan Singh) had been around, they would have thought ye morcha kahaan chalaa gayaa…

    The Chinese took out Major saab’s morcha first. They were able to see everything (about the Indian position). So, Singh Ram and the others, they were fighting with bayonets?

    Yadav: Yes, but sometimes the bayonets wouldn’t work. The Chinese were wearing thick parkas, and the bayonets couldn’t penetrate them. I saw our men, stabbing repeatedly with their bayonets, and the blade would not go through. So Singh Ram just grabbed them by their necks and smashed their heads together and against rocks.

    He was a wrestler…

    Yadav: Bahut tagda pehelwaan tha.He could catch people like me by the scruff of our necks and say, ‘C’mon, heat the milk’. I was his boxer.

    Nihal saab, you have narrated the story of how you escaped. Did anyone else manage to get away as well?

    Singh: No one with me.

    Yadav: Oh yes, one more, Ram Pal escaped. The next day.

    Ramchanderji, tell me, what did you do?

    Yadav: When we were overrun—my saab was lying motionless, and I was wounded—I remembered what (Company Havaldar Major) Harphool (Singh) had said, ‘Do not let the Chinese get their hands on Major saab’s body.’ So I opened the sling of the rifle and tied Major saab to myself with the belt, joining our bodies together at the waist. And then, slowly, I started to roll.

    The Major was still alive?

    Yadav: There was very little life left in him. After about 10 yards, there was gravelly ground, and I started rolling down faster. I rolled for 400 yards, and then there was a nullah, after that boulders again. After rolling for 400 yards, I stopped near a boulder to catch my breath. I was thinking that the Company headquarters are below, so I should try to somehow get a couple of people from there to help me, so I can take saab down. But when it was 8.15 by his watch, I noticed that the Major saab was no longer alive. Because Major saab’s watch ran by his pulse, and when the pulse stopped, the watch stopped as well. I took off the Major’s gloves, and slid his body between boulders to hide it, so that it remained safe until someone could come to fetch it. Then I made my way down. I came down about a kilometre, to the point from where our rations were supplied. I saw that the quarter master’s depot was in flames.

    The few people who were there had left after setting the depot on fire…

    Singh: Haan, Company to khatm ho hi gayi thi…

    Yadav: Yes, the commander had called them back. I wondered what to do. And then I saw one of our jeeps, with the occupants signalling to me. I moved towards them.

    You were the only one who returned alive from that battle… So, when you narrated that story, did your commanders believe you?

    Yadav: Only one commander believed me. D D Shukla, who was the adjutant… He said every word of what he is saying is true. Then Dhingra saab also believed this, and the brigade commander, he too accepted the real story…

    But when you came to Delhi, and your debriefing took place, did people believe you?

    Yadav: The atmosphere in Delhi was such that I did not even feel like having food. Because, if I give a statement, and that statement is contradicted immediately by my commander…

    Why did your commander contradict your statement?

    Yadav: He said I had gone crazy, he warned me I could be court-martialled, he said we could not have killed so many Chinese.

    So they were saying you were so few people, you could not have killed so many Chinese?

    Yadav: Right. So I said, saab, ek baat hai, aap haalaat ko dekhiye (Sir, please see the circumstances). You come there and I will tell you how we killed so many. I said, you note down these three points: Major saab’s body, his gloves with his blood; in the Company, you will find every jawan with bullet wounds on his chest, you will not get wounds on their backs; nursing assistant Dharam Pal, he put bandages on 32 wounded soldiers, and he died while bandaging his comrades.

    So, tell me more.

    Yadav: The jawan, he is holding the light machine gun, and he has bullets in his chest, and is dead…But the machine gun hasn’t fallen from his hands even when he is dead, he is clasping the machine gun. And the jawan throwing the grenade, dead, with the grenade still in his hands, the Chinese couldn’t take the grenade off his hand.

    And many were found with their bayonets too?

    Yadav: Yes, with their bayonets in their hands, in a crouching position, bullets in their chest, dead, holding the naked bayonet in a fighting stance.

    Their bodies had frozen.

    Yadav: Yes, the bodies were all frozen. Our commander saab (Brigadier Raina, who later became the Army Chief) became so emotional that his artificial eye moved from its position. He burst into tears. He was told, ‘Sir, have courage, calm down, this is war, the jawans have done their very best…’ Those who came from Delhi were told, ‘Come with us to the quarter master’s.’ They said, ‘No, this is enough. We have seen what we had to see. Whatever you had said was actually an understatement. Each one of you killed 10 Chinese, and then you died.’ So, this was the battle of Rezang La.

    That is what Lata Mangeshkar sang, didn’t she, dus dus ko ek ne maara… And even the Chinese accepted it. When you hear repeatedly that in 1962, the Indian Army lost, the Indian Army did not fight, does it hurt you?

    Yadav, Singh: It happened. In Bomdila, in NEFA.

    Why did it happen?

    Yadav: That was the fault of our commanders. When the general himself goes away to Delhi, then who will fight the war? We gave our everything.

    So what would you like to tell today’s jawans and officers? What lesson should they learn from the battle of Rezang La?

    Yadav: You see, my battalion got another chance after Rezang La, near Jaisalmer….

    Singh: In 1971.

    Yadav: Everyone has to die one day, but let us do something before we die. My son is also in 13 Kumaon. In the 1999 war, he was hit by a shell on his chest, and the doctor called me to the hospital. He said, ‘We suggest that you let the splinter be, trying to take it out might create problems…’ So my son is there, living with it.

    Have the two of you seen the film Haqeeqat, because it has been made on the battle of Rezang La? Kar chale hum fida jaanon tan saathiyon, ab tumhare hawale watan saathiyon…

    Yadav: But we have not been acknowledged in the film. I left the hall midway and walked out.

    Why? Because it said Punjab?

    Yadav: Yes. We fought the war, it should have been Kumaon. There are so many battalions—Kumaon, Rajput, Jat, Sikh—so why is there no battalion for us? Why don’t they give us an Ahir battalion as well?

    The battle that was shown (in Haqeeqat), was that okay?

    Yadav: It was okay, but I left midway when I saw what was written on the shoulder.

    And what lovely lyrics. Zinda rehne ke mausam bahut hain magar… jaan dene ki rut roz aati nahin…

    Yadav: This is what I tell my child, arey baawla, khali haath aaya hai, khaali haath jaana hai (you have come into this world with nothing, and you will leave with nothing). Do something while you are alive. Your father fought a war and you are in the same unit.

    The battle that you fought changed the course of the war of 1962. Because, if you had not fought off the Chinese, they would have captured Chushul that very day. But because you fought so bravely, the others got some time, and could withdraw, and some others were able to fortify defences. And the Chinese also suffered so much.

    Yadav: Yes, they could not sustain it after Rezang La. They had to declare a ceasefire. It is here that they got the big blow, not in Bomdila, not in NEFA… This is where we held on, and fought them back.

    Just to explain the significance of this battle. This wasn’t just the charge of the light brigade, a brave but foolhardy charge. It actually brought about a strategic turnaround in the war of 1962, because it broke the Chinese advance, the Chinese momentum. It is our good fortune that people like these survived, just a handful of them, to TELL us the brave tale !
     
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  19. ghost

    ghost Regular Member

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    Harbhajan Baba ki Jai” (Glory to Harbhajan Baba), cry out many voices in unison as tourist buses, packed with both Indian and foreign tourists, cabs full of people and private vehicles, all cross the bridge over the Teesta River to enter the border sate of Sikkim in India. Harbhajan Baba is revered across Sikkim as a sacred person. This is his story:

    nathula pass.jpg

    Nathula Pass



    The late Harbhajan Singh enrolled in the Punjab Regiment in 1966, joining the army at an early age. He became a Sepoy (a rank in the Indian Army) and found himself posted on the misty heights of the China - Indian border, near Nathula Pass.

    Two years later, while escorting a mule caravan from his battalion headquarters at Tukla to Deng Chukla, he fell into a fast- flowing stream and was washed away.

    The army searched for his body, but it wasn’t found until he began appearing in the dreams of other Sepoys in his unit. In the dream, he informed his colleagues that he was no longer alive and told them where to find his body. He also told them that he would continue to be a soldier always and not tolerate in lax patrolling of this sensitive border.

    When a search party was dispatched to the spot that had been described in the dreams, Sepoy Harbhajan Singh’s body was found. He was cremated with full military honors, and a memorial shrine was made at Chhokya Cho dedicated to his memory. This shrine is a three-room complex where there is a bed laid out for him and his uniform and boots displayed for the visitors. The caretakers swear that each morning the bed sheets are crushed as if someone has slept in the bed the previous night and the carefully polished boots are soiled and covered with mud.

    There are also many army reports of a lone man patrolling the area. Soldiers deployed in the area often talk of a lone uniformed man on horseback patrolling the region. Forces on the other side of the border have also confirmed these reports and claim that they too have seen the ghost rider.

    Over the years, soldiers here have claimed seeing Harbhajan Singh in their dreams where he instructed them of unprotected areas from where the Chinese could attack. His instructions generally proved accurate and the legend of Baba Harbhajan Singh grew.

    There are also stories of battle-weary soldiers who have nodded off during their patrols being woken up with stinging slaps. Obviously, this ghost does not tolerate laxity in duty.

    Baba Harbhajan Singh

    Baba Harbhajan Singh

    The Indian army continued to promote this Sepoy as if he were still alive. A paycheck would be sent home to Punjab every month and he was given annual leave on September 14 every year, when soldiers would pack his trunk with basic essentials. Two soldiers would accompany the trunk of ‘Capt Harbhajan’ all the way to Punjab by train, and it would be brought back after a month the same way. This tradition continued for years until he was retired a few years back.

    When I visited the shrine of Harbhajan Baba on my way to see the Nathula border, I witnessed this incredible scene of a dead man’s belongings being packed in a trunk, and being seen off by his fellow officers for a month’s leave.

    At 14000ft, located amidst towering mountains, broken by gushing waterfalls and colorful heather and gorse bushes, this shrine attracts devout believers from all over India. Following the twisting narrow roads at a steep incline, vehicles snake their way to this shrine and all people passing through this area, civilians and soldiers alike, generally stop at the shrine to pay obeisance to the revered Baba. Not doing so is supposed to bring bad luck.

    Baba Harbhajan Singh Shrine







    Way to Nathula

    Perhaps the Chinese are just as superstitious as we are because at the monthly flag meetings between the two nations at Nathula, even today the Chinese set a chair aside for the ghost of Harbhajan Baba.

    As the Indian flag flutters in the icy winds, it grows misty. Cold fingers of fog creep up to wipe out the sun and it is not difficult to imagine a lonely figure guarding his country’s borders with a zeal that has lasted beyond death.

    Believe me, this shrine with its resident ghost sent shivers down my spine when I heard the story of this patriotic ghost soldier while sipping hot tea the caretakers offer to all who come to visit this shrine in the remote border area.
     
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  20. ghost

    ghost Regular Member

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    Imagine if Helm's Deep had only been defended by two dozen guys and the enemy crossed the sheer overwhelming math of a zombie horde with the Empire's propensity for terrifying marshal efficiency.

    That's what one Sergeant Yakov Pavlov's platoon found themselves facing down in September of 1942. The Nazis were pushing into Russia as part of the biggest military operation in the history of the human race, and everything was about to come to a head in the city of Stalingrad with a battle over a single bombed-out apartment building.


    They called it the "Battle of Stalingrad" because "The Battle of That Building Where Sergei's Mom Used to Live" didn't sound quite as impressive.

    Pavlov and his platoon was tasked with the thankless job of retaking the building after the Nazis had seized it. To get a snapshot of what their mindset was like heading in, it's helpful to know that the assignment was considered an extremely dangerous one by the Soviet Army, and that the Soviet Army's slogan at the time was "die for Russia."


    Somehow, the slogan failed to raise morale.

    Doing the quick math, Pavlov realized his only chance was to throw his whole platoon into the meat grinder, and hope that the speed with which they passed through left at least a few alive. He lost all but four men in the assault, but eventually his plan worked and they took the building. Had they known they were dealing with a man who considered four people surviving a success, the Nazis probably would have realized that they were in for some serious shit. Having barely enough survivors to outfit a respectable zombie movie, Pavlov could only station one soldier to each floor. However, the drop-dead gorgeous line of sight it offered was enough for them to unleash a mountain of unholy hell against all Fascist comers.


    The last face many Nazis ever saw.

    The building was subjected to relentless fire--as were the civilians huddled in its basement--but Pavlov's unit held out long enough to be reinforced by a still-tiny 25 men. Not a wizard, but it was all they needed. His men were given machine guns, rifles, mortars, barbed-wire, anti-tank mines, some body armor and a PTRS-41 anti-tank rifle which Pavlov personally used to snipe a dozen tanks from the rooftop. They basically used what little equipment they had to convert the apartment into a goddamn anti-Nazi death machine that could annihilate whatever came at it from a kilometer in every direction.

    As long as everyone conserved their ammo and manned their posts, the only real danger posed to the building came from flamethrowers. Fortunately, with legendary snipers like 19-year-old Anatoly Chekhov on the top floor, this usually resulted in a Viking funeral for the Nazis.

    Wave after wave of the German army hammered the building. And died.

    Later, Pavlov's men could boast that they killed more Germans defending their one building than the French killed in the entire fall of Paris. And unfortunately for French egos, they were still alive to boast--by February 2 the next year, the Battle of Stalingrad was over. Pavlov was named a Hero of the Soviet Union, and the building he defended was made into a monument.
     
  21. ghost

    ghost Regular Member

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    Location:
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    The Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare

    The Half-Assed Hollywood Effort:

    Hopefully you didn't see the movie The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen but did read the comics, which feature a band of legendary fictional characters such as Captain Nemo, the Invisible Man and Dr. Jeckyll/Mr. Hyde, all coming together from separate fictional universes to save the world.

    The Badass True Story:

    What if we told you that there was a secret military unit during World War II which featured this guy:

    And this guy:

    ...who operated out of Sherlock Holmes' headquarters and saved the world from nuclear annihilation at the hands of the Nazis?

    Meet the Special Operations Executive, a super-secret branch of the UK military personally tasked by Winston Churchill to "set Europe ablaze." On the crew were James Bond-creator Ian Fleming (who would base Bond on his own experiences), as well as members who would be Fleming's inspirations for M, Q, Miss Moneypenny and the sultry Vesper Lynd. They were joined by the future Dracula/Saruman/Dooku Christopher Lee. They were stationed at Baker Street. Yep, the place where the fictional Sherlock Holmes solved his mysteries.

    These "Baker Street Irregulars" were Churchill's go-to guys and girls for "ungentlemanly" warfare. If there was a bridge that needed busting or an Axis officer who needed seducing, you'd better believe the SOE had all the cloaks and daggers necessary to make sure Colonel Arschloch spent his last moments of WWII getting murdered in his bed anywhere from the English Channel to Southeast Asia.

    The Ministry's greatest achievement, and perhaps the single finest act of sabotage in all of WWII, was Operation Gunnerside: a crossover between the Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare and their cousins in the Norwegian Resistance. Their mission: train a crack commando unit of former-Vikings to join SOE on a secret mission to destroy a heavy water plant in Norway before the Nazis could build an atomic bomb with it. It's thanks to these unknown bastards of WWII that Hitler didn't have any nuclear-tipped V-2 rockets to turn the last months of the war into something akin to Judgment Day.
     

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