INS Vikramaditya (Adm Gorshkov) aircraft carrier

Discussion in 'Indian Navy' started by nitesh, Feb 20, 2009.

  1. tarunraju

    tarunraju Moderator Moderator

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    The former has more torque/volume needed to push such a heavy ship.
     
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  2. Yumdoot

    Yumdoot Regular Member

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    I think I don't quite get it but the oil boilers also feed steam into the turbines which similarly move at very high speeds to be useful for propellor shafts. It is the reduction gearing arrangement that helps manage the show.

    Marine Disel Engines as well as Gas Turbines are being used almost similarly for the turbines. Actually I have read that efficiency increases with this arrangement.

    http://www.rolls-royce.com/~/media/...uments/news/6-page-qe-booklet-tcm92-58802.pdf
     
  3. tharun

    tharun Patriot Senior Member

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    Now a days gas turbines and reduction gear are good
     
  4. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Boiler Training Facility To Be Set Up For Ins Vikramaditya At Lonavala

    NS Vikramaditya, or erstwhile Admiral Gorshkov which belonged to the Russian Navy, is a modified Kiev-class aircraft carrier and has been the frontline aircraft carrier of Indian Navy since 2013.

    INS Shivaji, the Indian Navy’s premier technical training station at Lonavala, is slated to get a boiler training facility for the country’s main aircraft carrier — INS Vikramaditya. A foundation stone for the facility was laid at INS Shivaji on Tuesday.

    INS Vikramaditya, or erstwhile Admiral Gorshkov which belonged to the Russian Navy, is a modified Kiev-class aircraft carrier and has been the frontline aircraft carrier of Indian Navy since 2013.

    [​IMG]
    Foundation stone being laid of boiler training facility for INS Vikramaditya
    A press release from Defence PRO in Pune said, “Creation of the Vikramaditya Training Facility, comprising of 100 TPH (tons per hour) boiler along with auxiliary machinery, would provide hands-on training to officers and sailors for operation and upkeep of the Main Propulsion Plant installed onboard INS Vikramaditya.”

    “The training facility is also aimed at providing a platform for future support of the ship-fit main machinery and control system, through indigenisation,” added the release.

    Vice Admiral AR Karve, Flag Officer Commanding-in- Chief (Southern Naval Command), laid down the foundation stone for the training facility during his two-day visit to INS Shivaji. The visit was aimed at reviewing the training activities and infrastructure projects. The admiral inspected the Return Guard at INS Shivaji on Monday. He also laid down the foundation stone for senior sailors’ accommodation complex at INS Shivaji.

    While interacting with the officers and personnel of Station Lonavla, Admiral Karve emphasized on the requirement to keep abreast with advanced technologies being inducted on Naval platforms.

    http://indianexpress.com/article/in...-up-for-ins-vikramaditya-at-lonavala-3090449/
     
  5. Prashant12

    Prashant12 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Cochin Shipyard Limited Successfully Re-fits Aircraft Carrier INS Vikramaditya


    The Cochin Shipyard Limited dispelled doubts that CSL could repair the largest Indian aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya, when on 5th November, 2016 the refit was completed a month ahead of schedule. This aircraft carrier was purchased from Russia and commissioned into the naval fleet in 2014.

    Shri Rajesh Gopalakrishnan, General Manager (Ship Repair Division) at CSL said “Till INS Vikramaditya docked in Cochin Shipyard and water was pumped out of the dock and we had her sitting safely, there was a real concern on whether India could do it”.

    INS Vikramaditya is one of the biggest ships owned by India and ever to have docked in India till date. In September, the Indian Navy, one of CSL’s biggest client, decided to dry-dock the carrier attached to its Karwar Naval Base at CSL for repairs on a contracted schedule of 70 days. It was clearly an opportunity for CSL to prove that India had the infrastructure as well as expertise for the task. This will also ensure readiness and preparedness with an indigenous capability in case of an emergency, without having to face the embarrassment of sending the ship outside the country for repairs.

    To lay the concerns to rest, CSL tasked IIT Chennai to undertake a detailed dock floor strength analysis to prove that CSL dock indeed had the capacity to accommodate loads of this nature. The design of the dock blocks was done in-house thereafter by CSL to seat the Carrier in the dry-dock. Ultimately, CSL got the opportunity to demonstrate its capability to dock and repair INS Vikramaditya.

    But, there was considerable planning & preparation to be done at CSL to accommodate the ship. This involved administrative, logistic and technical arrangements of a large magnitude. For one, INS Vikramaditya needed specially designed dock blocks made of plenty of hard as well as soft wood on which she could sit. (Shipyards typically go for a combination of concrete and wood to dry dock ships for repairs. But, in this case, plenty of “wholly wood” blocks were also used to address the loading concerns.) Another major cause for apprehension was whether this ship with higher draft would be able to clear the dry-dock sill without its propeller getting damaged, especially with the available water levels and tidal conditions in Kochi.

    Then, there was water depth issue to tackle. The carrier needed higher water depth to enter the Kochi harbour. The entire outer channel, Ernakulam channel and harbour area, including dock mouth and berths at CSL were dredged to a depth of close to 14 Mtr.

    While CSL was undertaking preparatory activities to enable the ship to dock, INS Vikramaditya had to berth at the ICTT Terminal nearby with a depth of 14.5 Mtr. This was to facilitate the ship to propel into Kochi on her own power.

    The work package was contracted and scheduled for 70 days but certain operational requirements demanded significant compression of the time-frame and the ship was un-docked and taken out of the yard in 42 days.

    Accolades have been pouring in for CSL from various quarters including the Indian Navy complimenting “CSL for working whole-heartedly 24X7 and for proving that not only is the dock fully suitable but also that that commitment and capability of Indians is second to none.”.

    “It was all about human endeavour, team spirit, passion, nation building and Indian pride. CSL literally moved heaven and earth and burnt the midnight oil to complete the task entrusted to us by the Indian Navy and that too way ahead of schedule,” says a gleaming Madhu S Nair, the Chairman & Managing Director of Cochin Shipyard Limited.

    Incidentally, all three aircraft carriers of the Indian Navy were in and around CSL for around a month during this period. First, INS Viraat, came into CSL for a short refit before its de-commissioning (which is understood is planned for early 2017). INS Vikramaditya, originally expected for refit at CSL in October 2016, was dry-docked in September 2016. It was virtually a touch and go situation for CSL as INS Vikramaditya came in close on the heels of INS Viraat. INS Viraat, was still berthed at Kochi when INS Vikramaditya came in to dry-dock at CSL. All this while, the third carrier, INS Vikrant, Indian’s First Ingenuously built Aircraft Carrier was under construction at CSL, resulting in a situation where all the three aircraft carriers were in Cochin. The whole effort and its tremendous success augers well not only for India’s most dynamic shipyard, the Cochin Shipyard Limited, but also for the nation as a whole.

    http://www.khabarindia.in/cochin-sh...ly-re-fits-aircraft-carrier-ins-vikramaditya/
     
  6. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

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    They were suppose to fit CIWS in this very refit ..
     
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  7. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    Cochin Shipyard refits INS Vikramaditya ahead of schedule[​IMG]In September, the Navy, one of CSL's biggest clients, decided to dry-dock the carrier attached to Karwar Naval Base at CSL for repairs on contracted schedule of 70 days.
     
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  8. raja696

    raja696 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Hfo's used as fuel need steam to increase temperature en decrease viscosity.

    Compared to hfo , gas fuel doesn't need heating. Which increases efficiency and less maintenance but increases need of sophisticated safety equipment and design complexity.

    Gas fuels required storages at high pressure to be maintained in liquid state, occupy less space. Which demands extra stiffners or reinforcements to sustain hull tank integrity.which adds extra weight.

    In case of war gas tanks are vulnerable to explosions (leaks etc)due to high impacts .

    If above issues are addressed consistently gas turbines are always better I guess.
     
  9. Filtercoffee

    Filtercoffee Regular Member

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    Well young ibpsmaster, the problems obviously have to be ironed out.

    Sent from my 2014818 using Tapatalk
     
  10. lcafanboy

    lcafanboy Senior Member Senior Member

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    There are 2 types of carriers at present STOBAR and CATOBAR. India has STOBAR INS Vikramadtiya and is building Ins Vikrant (maybe one more sister ship too) since CATOBARs are too expensive to operate and maintain but are very effective and allows to operate fighters at full capacity (war payload and fuel). Whereas STOBARS like ours lowers a fighters capabilities both (less fuel and payload like seen in MIG29k as compared to land version), since the main engines even working with full afterburners (which depletes fuel lowering range) can't accelerate it to the required speed for the given runway.

    Now can we use STOBAR carriers with a newer technology (will have to work on) where we can use rocket assistance to launch the fighters with full capacity on a STOBAR carrier. Here we can use strap on rockets below the main engines while launching the fighters on sortie, here we won't have to engage afterburners like in CATOBAR while fighters carrying full payload (fuel and weapon) and once the fighter is in air depleted rockets can be discarded (I suppose a few land based Drones are launched using rocket assistance). This can improve the effectiveness of our Aircraft Carriers INS Vikramadtiya and Ins Vikrant without shelling too much. Even you can use this for your upcoming N-LSA.
     
  11. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    INS Vikramaditya with its Air Arm
    [​IMG]
    Credit: @RPK
     
  12. aditya10r

    aditya10r Mera Bharat mahan Senior Member

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    The total equipment onboard and the ship itself costs as much as half of baki defence budget and yet they want to fight us
     
  13. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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  14. raviprakash

    raviprakash Regular Member

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    INS Vikramaditya in Cochin Shipyard INS VIK in Kochi Shipyard.jpg
     
  15. mayfair

    mayfair Elite Member Elite Member

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    I am just curious, can we not use mid-air refueling to offset lower fuel load at take off? Once the fighter is in the air, why not top up the tanks?
     
  16. IndianHawk

    IndianHawk Senior Member Senior Member

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    Obviously that will be done if the mission range is longer.
    But it still imposes a time penalty.
    In times of conflict that is a serious disadvantage.

    Anyway we are moving on to CATOBAR and maybe even EMLS in next carrier.
     
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  17. Tactical Frog

    Tactical Frog Regular Member

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    Thinking of buddy-buddy refuelling ? We do that a lot with the Rafale M. Su-30 MKI can do that too ...
    Not sure if that would work well with Mig 29 K on STOBAR aircraft carriers. Buddy refuelling pods are heavy.
     
  18. charlie

    charlie Regular Member

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    [​IMG]
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    ..................................................
     
  19. charlie

    charlie Regular Member

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    That's a normal tactic used depending on the mission.
     
  20. Tactical Frog

    Tactical Frog Regular Member

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