India's strategic implications, challenges, opportunities and quest for great power status

Discussion in 'Defence & Strategic Issues' started by Indx TechStyle, Aug 23, 2016.

  1. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    I had to post the topic a long back and must have collected many articles, but I got late. Now, got the mood with a fresh article and kicking it off. Just in few posts, you guys will come to know, what sort of stuff is to be posted here.:)
    India's strategic implications, challenges, opportunities and quest for great power status in a Bipolar World
     
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  3. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    Is India Dipping Its Toes In The Syrian Mess? – Analysis
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  4. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    IDN TAKE: Militarization Of South China Sea – Golden Opportunity for India
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    Area of contention between different nations in the South China Sea region
     
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  5. PD_Solo

    PD_Solo The only one

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    Very good article .

    Modi Doval combo has now started with "two eyes for one" attitude.I have read online somewhere that aggression may backfire but we can't live with our pride held to the wall. China long played paki card which is now getting worn out and India is giving a befitting reply to both neighbors,be it growing diplomatic relations in SCS or feeding the Baloch mirchi.
     
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  6. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    Too long article. Not writing in quote for easier read.
    India's new rules of engagement
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    Photo-illustration
    Offensive defence. The phrase is an oxymoron that originates from the adage, "the best defence is a good offence". The principle behind it is to be proactive rather than passive when attacked, thereby regaining the strategic advantage and cramping an opponent's ability to launch a counter-offensive. Chinese military strategist Sun Tzu was a key advocate of this idea, as was Italian philosopher and diplomat Niccolo Machiavelli. George Washington had employed it to good effect more than 200 years ago when he fought America's War of Independence. Mao Zedong, too, was a firm believer of the tactic while leading the 1949 Chinese Revolution.

    Now, Prime Minister Narendra Modi joins the long list of leaders who have sought to employ this curiously phrased approach to their advantage. In his Independence Day address this year, Modi stunned the Pakistani ruling establishment, which had launched a major international offensive against India following the recent turmoil in Kashmir, by signalling his willingness to take the battle deep into its territory.

    From the ramparts of the Red Fort, Modi stated: "Today, I want to greet and express my thanks to some people. In the last few days, the people of Balochistan, Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan-occupied Kashmir have thanked me, have expressed gratitude, and expressed good wishes for me. The people who are living far away, whom I have never seen, never met-such people have expressed appreciation for the Prime Minister of India, for 125 crore countrymen. This is an honour for our countrymen."

    MODI'S BOLD GAMBIT

    Modi's mention of Pakistan-occupied Kashmir (PoK) was par for the course, as India always regarded reclaiming Gilgit-Baltistan as the "unfinished business of Partition". But making common cause with the people of the troubled Balochistan province of Pakistan infuriated Islamabad and startled capitals across the world. The ostensible reason was the alleged human rights violations by the Pakistan Army against the protesters who were demanding azadi. But it was viewed as more than just a tit-for-tat response to Pakistan's charges of 'brutality' by the Indian security forces in the Kashmir Valley. Modi was clearly warning Pakistan that India was changing the rules of engagement from its current posture of conciliation to an offensive defence. India was now willing to get tough-and rough, if needed. The implication was that India had decided to make it a costly proposition for Pakistan to back terror groups and strikes.

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    By upping the ante, the Indian prime minister had slapped the Pakistan Army, particularly its chief Raheel Sharif, with a direct challenge. The army had thwarted any effort by Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif to improve relations with India and is suspected to have engineered the attack on the Pathankot air base this January. India was indicating that it was willing to stir the pot in territories far removed from the Line of Control (LoC). In doing so, Modi was making an audacious gambit fraught with risks.
    There were questions raised about whether this was more of a tactical manoeuvre by India to deflect world attention from the ongoing turmoil in Kashmir. Also, whether Modi had thought through taking on Pakistan and China simultaneously, as the move also challenged Beijing's vital interests in Balochistan. It raised several other concerns: How can India seek world action against Pakistan's continuing perfidy if it is also seen to be backing separatists? Would India cede the moral high ground in its war against terror if it got involved in Balochistan? Also, if Pakistan raised the stakes and carried out a series of attacks on Indian territory, was India prepared to retaliate strongly and even risk a nuclear war?

    THE YO-YO EFFECT
    From bonhomie to badmouthing, Modi has seen it all in a short span of two years while trying to build relations with India's hostile neighbour. Opposition parties have charged Modi with following a "yo-yo policy" with Pakistan that is largely knee-jerk, lacks cohesion and has no long-term strategy. Modi backers quote Churchill's dictum that "consistency is the virtue of only donkeys". A senior official points out, "You cannot be brain-dead to what the other guy is doing. If the situation is rapidly changing in Pakistan, how can your policy not change? Should we be consistent if Pakistan is inconsistent?"
    To his credit, Modi was quick off the blocks with his "neighbourhood first" policy by inviting Nawaz Sharif along with other South Asian leaders for his swearing-in ceremony in May 2014. But the mood changed when foreign secretary-level talks were called off, with India accusing Pakistan of crossing the red line by playing the Hurriyat card. Then, a meeting between Modi and Sharif at Ufa in Russia in July 2015 produced a ray of hope before ending in a fiasco, with talks between the two national security advisors being called off over whether Sartaj Aziz could meet the Hurriyat leaders or not when he came to Delhi. India was clear there would be no third party in the negotiations with Pakistan and would call off talks if Islamabad disrespected it.
    Relations were repaired when Modi met Sharif at the sidelines of the Climate Change Summit in Paris in November 2015. Within weeks, there was a breakthrough with Union minister for external affairs Sushma Swaraj announcing in Islamabad, along with her Pakistani counterpart Sartaj Aziz, that the two countries had agreed to restart what they called a Comprehensive Bilateral Dialogue. The word 'bilateral' was inserted on the insistence of India to ensure that the Hurriyat would not be involved in the negotiations. The announcement signalled the resumption of formal talks seven years after these were called off, following the Mumbai attack. In a grand gesture, Modi made an impromptu stopover at Lahore on Christmas to greet Sharif on his birthday. Everyone was all smiles, till the Pathankot attack happened a week later.
    The attack on the Pathankot air base by heavily armed groups resulted in the death of eight Indians, including seven security personnel, apart from four attackers. For once, Pakistan didn't deny that the attackers were operating from its soil and pointed to the Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM) as being responsible. Sharif even had an FIR registered in Gujranwala, based on documents given by India. Then, in April 2016, India agreed to allow a Joint Investigative Team from Pakistan to visit Pathankot to collect evidence for the case-another first.
    However, Pakistan inexplicably cooled off when India insisted that, as reciprocity demanded, its investigation agency team go to Gujranwala to cross-examine those arrested. Pakistan High Commissioner Abdul Basit blamed India for embarrassing Sharif by leaking out unsubstantiated findings from the JIT's visit, breaking the understanding that secrecy would be maintained. He also claimed there was no agreement on reciprocity. India's deduction was that a serious battle for power between the two Sharifs had broken out and changed the ground dynamics for better relations. The assessment would prove accurate.

    SHARIF VS SHARIF
    In late April, the Panama Papers, containing 11 million documents held by a Panama-based law firm, were leaked. They exposed links between many political leaders and businessmen around the world and revealed the details of offshore companies and accounts. For Nawaz Sharif, this was bad news. The documents showed three of his children owned offshore companies that were not shown in his family's wealth statement. On the defensive, Sharif rejected the charges and said he would institute an inquiry under a retired judge, but that suggestion was nixed by the Opposition. Army Chief Raheel Sharif chose the occasion to state that terrorism could not be checked unless the "menace of corruption" was not curbed.
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    Raheel Sharif had grown in popularity after he successfully launched full-fledged army operations, called Zarb-e-Azb, to wipe out Taliban groups inimical to Pakistan in its North Waziristan and Swat regions. He was also credited with cleansing Sindh of terrorists and restoring law and order in strife-torn Karachi. Raheel is to retire this November, and there has been much speculation in the past few months over whether the Nawaz Sharif government will be forced to give him an extension. The power tussle between the two has impacted Pakistan's relations with India, with the army chief disapproving of Nawaz Sharif's 'softness' towards Modi. This tension began to manifest itself almost immediately on the LoC, with the Indian Army reporting that infiltration attempts went up and money flowed from across the border to militant groups.
    Meanwhile, China began to increase its efforts to build the $46 billion China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), which it had announced the previous year. Described as a "game-changer", China proposes to build a highway which runs from Kashgar in China, through PoK, including Gilgit-Baltistan, right up to Gwadar in Balochistan, on the edge of the Persian Gulf. The plan also includes building power projects that will add 10,400 MW to the grid and ease Pakistan's power shortage. India vociferously protested to China, saying they were building the highway through the disputed territory of PoK. Raheel flew to China to seal a deal that would give army protection to the whole project (see accompanying report).
    Under its all-powerful president Xi Jinping, China also began to assert itself aggressively on international issues. India felt the heat when it openly backed Pakistan and vetoed India's membership for the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG). China also blocked a move at the UN Security Council to bring sanctions against JeM chief Masood Azhar despite India's protests. Emboldened by China's support, Pakistan began meddling in Kashmir again with renewed vigour. Then, much to Pakistan's glee, Kashmir began to spin out of control because of internal dissensions in India.

    THE KASHMIR TRIGGER
    When the People's Democratic Party (PDP) and the BJP formed the historic coalition government, with Mufti Mohammed Sayeed as the chief minister of Jammu & Kashmir, in January 2015, Pakistan was dismayed. It had hoped to prey on the fractured mandate in the assembly elections, but the coming together of the Hindu right-wing BJP with the Muslim soft-separatist PDP put paid to its plans. Sayeed had hoped to be the bridge between his state and India and between India and Pakistan, but that was not to be. His untimely death in January 2016 propelled his reluctant daughter, Mehbooba Mufti, to power.
    Mehbooba's supporters in Kashmir were uncomfortable with the alliance with the BJP, and she refused to assume charge till Modi put in a set of confidence-building measures in place. Barely three months after she took over as the state's first woman chief minister, security forces killed Burhan Muzaffar Wani in an encounter in Kokernag on July 8. Though he was proclaimed as the poster-boy of the new militancy sweeping the Valley, security and police forces regarded him largely as a 'virtual tiger' because of his extensive use of social media.
    Both the state and central government underestimated the backlash that would follow, and did not take adequate security measures for his funeral, for which there was a massive turnout, followed by a wave of protests. Wani's death proved to be the trigger for simmering discontent that had spread in the Valley, especially among the youth. The resultant confrontation with security forces has led to more than 68 deaths, and parts of the Valley have been under curfew for over a month-and-a-half.
    Though much of the initial uprising was spontaneous, Pakistan seized the opportunity and reportedly activated its dormant cells in the Valley to add fuel to the flames. It simultaneously launched an international propaganda campaign on Kashmir. Under pressure, Nawaz Sharif, who had so far maintained a restraint in his statements against India, stepped up the rhetoric, saying that it was 'obligatory' of him to become the "voice of Kashmir". He shot off letters to the UN Secretary General and the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, urging them to intervene to end the "persistent and egregious violation of basic human rights". Part of the noise was for electoral politics in PoK, with the so-called Azad Jammu & Kashmir (AJK) elections being held last month, and Sharif's party, the PML (N), winning a majority.
    Meanwhile, Modi moved swiftly to bring the situation under control. Union home minister Rajnath Singh was sent to the state to provide whatever assistance was required. The prime minister then held an all-party meeting to discuss the best course of action and bring a unity of purpose. Modi and his team were angered by Pakistan's demand for a foreign secretaries' meeting to discuss Kashmir's internal situation. Rajnath too was shown discourtesy when he went to Islamabad for the SAARC summit, where Pakistan interior minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan didn't attend the lunch he had hosted. There was also the much tom-tommed arrest in Balochistan of Kulbhushan Jadhav, who was charged with being an Indian spy (South Block called it 'absurd'), and was refused consular access by Pakistan. It was then that Modi, ever willing to take risks, went on the offensive and played the Balochistan card.

    WHY THE 'B' WORD
    Why Balochistan? Simply because, apart from being Pakistan's largest and most backward province, it provides a strategic passage to West Asia and Central Asia. The province harbours the Gwadar port, whose modernisation China has invested in heavily, along with leasing mines to tap its abundant gold and copper deposits. Much of the ambitious CPEC project cuts through Balochistan, making it of crucial importance.
    Balochistan is also Pakistan's Achilles' heel. It has a 2,500-km border with Afghanistan and Iran that has been the hotbed of cross-border militancy and strife. Since the merger with Pakistan in 1948, the Balochis have waged periodic battles for both autonomy and azadi that have often been brutally crushed by the Pakistan security forces. India's external intelligence agency, the Research & Analysis Wing (RAW), has been regularly accused by Islamabad of fomenting insurgency, though it has never come up with convincing proof.
    In 2009, when Manmohan Singh, as prime minister, permitted the mention of Balochistan in a joint statement with his Pakistan counterpart Yousaf Raza Gilani at Sharm el-Sheikh, he was castigated for his 'blunder' by BJP leaders, who said "the waters of the seven seas won't be able to wash the shame". It was seen as conceding that India was meddling in Pakistan's affairs and Manmohan was forced to backtrack. It must be galling to the former prime minister that while he was accused of being timid for putting Balochistan on the table, Modi's statements are being hailed as bold and brave by experts.
    Modi's backers dismiss criticism about having double standards on Balochistan. A senior official pointed out that when Manmohan mentioned the B-word, it was a defensive reaction to accusations made by Pakistan that India was stirring trouble in Balochistan, and he had agreed to discuss their concerns. In Modi's case, he argues, India is on the offensive by charging Pakistan with human rights violations in Balochistan. Using a cricketing analogy, he says, "If you pick up a bat and get bowled, it's not the same thing as me hitting it for a six."
    To criticism from Pakistan that India had crossed the 'red line' while invoking Balochistan, India's foreign affairs spokesperson Vikas Swarup retorted, "Pakistan recognises no red lines in its own diplomacy. Its record of cross-border terrorism and infiltration is at the heart of the problem of the region today." He also pointed out that India had raised concerns about human rights violations in Balochistan several times in the past. Another official asked whether there is an 'unwritten rule' that India and Pakistan keep their conversations to disagreements and violent activities in Kashmir. Pakistan is known to have gone beyond Kashmir in the past, extending support to the Khalistan movement and facilitating terror strikes in Mumbai and Pathankot. As the official puts it, "If they are not playing by the Queensberry rules, should we be doing it?" Pakistan's worry is that National Security Advisor A.K. Doval is an offensive defence expert and months before he took charge, he warned Pakistan: "If you do another Mumbai, you will lose Balochistan."

    THE CHALLENGES AHEAD
    The space for reconciliation between the two countries is narrowing rapidly. Pakistan has instigated activists all over the country to demonise Modi and burn his effigies to whip up nationalistic support on Balochistan. Pakistan officials charge Modi and the RSS of creating a divide with the ulterior motive of winning the forthcoming elections in Uttar Pradesh and Punjab. A Pakistan official said that India is mistaken if it thinks it can destabilise either Balochistan or Gilgit-Baltistan.
    Modi and his team's calculus is that the world is not going to poke its nose into Kashmir. After the Nice, Brussels and Paris attacks, the world has no sympathy for terrorists posing as freedom-fighters. As an official put it, "If Burhan Wani was in their country, would he have been tolerated? Also, Kashmir is like a Ranji match between India and Pakistan, not the Ashes-so Pakistan won't gain any traction." The prime minister has wisely engaged the entire political spectrum on what to do next in Kashmir. He has heeded former J&K chief minister Omar Abdullah's request to "find a more permanent solution" by engaging all political forces.
    By raising Balochistan, Modi has succeeded in blunting Pakistan's offensive on Kashmir and also addressed the public demand for a strong answer. But it has limited tactical utility. While Iran and Afghanistan may be happy that India is taking on Pakistan on Balochistan, they would be wary as they have sizeable populations of Balochis in their respective countries. China, too, may begin to flex its muscle, and India would find it difficult to combat two foes on its borders. So Modi needs to follow intent with action. He needs to have an organised game plan to follow through in a carefully calibrated manner. Modi has shown that he is capable of thinking out of the box. But he has to be careful not to be boxed in by his actions.
     
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  7. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    PM Narendra Modi’s Vietnam visit is to signal India’s presence in South-East Asia
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    Delhi and Hanoi have drawn closer to each other over the past decade amid China's growing aggression and ambitions in SE Asia including South China Sea (SCS) region.

    READ MORE:
    Vietnam|South China Sea|SEA|Narendra Modi|India|Cyber Security
     
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  8. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    India and Vietnam: Long Lost Cousins?
    Emphasising on the need to strengthen the bonds between India and Vietnam, the author enumerates the areas of cooperation between the two countries.
    By Dhrubajyoti Bhattacharjee

    A Historical Link
    People of Vietnam resolutely supported the freedom struggle in India; and India stood by Vietnam in Vietnam’s testing times during the 60s and 70s.

    India assured Vietnam of its full commitment to the strategic partnership between the two countries during a meeting in New Delhi between former Vietnamese defence minister PhùngQuang Thanh and Prime Minister Narendra Modi in May 2015.

    India’s Strategic and Commercial Interests

    According to former deputy prime minister of Vietnam Vu Khoan, “We understand that our country, in comparison with China, is a small one…Although they say friendship, they have invaded our territory. Ultimately, China must respect our nation and our sovereignty. Otherwise, Vietnamese will be ‘allergic’ to China”.
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    India has been participating actively in the modernisation of the defence forces of Vietnam. | Photo Courtesy: Passel
    Vietnamese Defense Modernisation and India
    Participation in Vietnamese modernization of defence forces by India will not only strengthen the diplomatic and military bond between both the nations but also open the doors of strategic exports.

    Suggested Areas of Cooperation

    Assessment

    With the sharing of each other’s expertise and technological know-how, together they can counter the larger powers at play, threatening the regional stability and strategic maritime routes.
    Dr Dhrubajyoti Bhattacharjee is a Research Fellow at the Indian Council of World Affairs (ICWA), Sapru House, New Delhi.
     
  9. spikey360

    spikey360 Crusader Senior Member

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    [​IMG]
    This Lion, whom Bharatmata has unleashed will not stop till all of Akhand Bharat is at her feet again
     
  10. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    Why India needs an overarching strategic discourse in national interest
    To recall the wise words of Robert Greene who advocates interest calls the ‘Grand Strategy’, be prepared to lose battles but win the war.
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  11. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    Targeting sovereignty of an insignificant plagued with terrorism and problems is not an big achievement, but doing surgical strikes inside a country with huge geographical and do diplomatic benefits, nuclear armed and ally of two Great Powers USA and PRC over that, this country claimed to be your arch rival with all it's India centric policies, is undoubtedly a nice example of demonstration of India's capabilities to project the power. It simply implies that India is also capable of protecting it's interests and can avenge martyrdom of it's soldiers beyond the borders in worse conditions.
    India’s Surgical Strikes Against Pakistan- A Game Changer
    Sep 30, 2016
    Ramaharitha Pusarla
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    As the news of surgical strikes by India against Pakistan was abuzz, the hues of response varied from elation, surprise and suspicion. For all those, who undermined the Indian leadership and military capabilities there was a formidable lump in the throat. Details apart, the surgical strikes carried out by the Northern Command were much needed to infuse confidence, sense of pride and respect for valor. The massive casualties inflicted by terrorists during the Uri attacks had not only exposed chinks in India’s armor but greatly dented morale of the armed personnel. Indian public too felt infuriated as Indian government had in no clear terms called for an instantaneous response. Having borne the brunt of brutal terrorist attacks, Indian public felt cheated when the party which vociferously denounced every act of Pakistan in opposition failed to deliver instantaneous justice. Though the DGMO Lt. Gen. Ranabir Singh asserted that “We will avenge the killings of our soldiers, but we will do so on cold-blooded professionally military assessment, and on a timeline our choosing, not one dictated by political imperatives or the prime-time news cycle”people hardly found any respite.

    In the meanwhile, Indian leadership critically evaluated plausible options to inflict damage to Pakistan on a long term. India finally harped on a multi-pronged approach to rein upon the brazen terror attacks. A range of diplomatic, political and economic assaults were considered. On diplomatic front, exercising right to reply India lacerated Sharif’s claims at UN word by word by saying that “the Land of Taxila, one of the greatest centers of ancient learning is now host to Ivy League of terrorism. It attracts aspirants and apprentices from all over the World”. India added that Pakistan had a “long standing policy of sponsoring terrorism, the consequences of which have spread well beyond our region.” The first secretary Eenam Gambhir added that Pakistan “channelizes billions of dollars, much of it is diverted from international aid, to training, financing and supporting terrorist groups as militant proxies against its neighbors”. This coincided with the US Senators Ted Poe and Dana Rohrabacher tabling a bill in Congress designating Pakistan as terror state. Simultaneously Indian Americans launched an online White House petition asking for declaring Pakistan as terrorist state gained tremendous response. The petition which promises action on local, state or international problems if the campaign receives 100,000 signatures. Before its official deadline of Oct 21stthe target was reached. Now the White House is forced to respond to it within 60 days. Besides, India openly snubbed Pakistan and decided not to attend the SAARC Summit at Islamabad. Fresh from the humiliating reception extended to Rajnath Singh when he attended the Interior Affairs Ministers Meeting of SAARC, Finance Minister later didn’t participate in SAARC Finance Ministers meet. Continuing the precedent, Prime Minister will abstain from SAARC. With India’s position actively backed by Bangladesh, Bhutan and Afghanistan the process of the regional isolation of Pakistan has officially begun. While experts questioned the relevance owing to SAARC’s miniscule clout internationally, India religiously followed the agenda of diplomatic isolation irrespective of the outcomes.

    To turn the heat on, India began reviewing the historical Indus Waters Treaty (IWT) brokered by World Bank in 1960. While India initially contemplated on scrapping IWT, it was perceived to be counterproductive. Instead India is considering three ways to use provisions of treaty to its advantage-firstly, suspension of meeting of Permanent Indus Commission so that grievance redressal mechanism is halted and Pakistan would meet a dead end, secondly restarting the Tulbul Project ( Pakistan calls it Wullar Bridge), India suspended the construction across Jhelum river in 1987 following objections from Pakistan, thirdly an inter-ministerial task force would be set up to monitor the water usage from Western Rivers-Ravi, Beas, Sutlej. India is considering on maximizing the use of waters from rivers governed by Pakistan-Jhelum, Chenab and Indus. While the repercussions may not be spontaneous desired effect will be felt within a span of 5-10 years. Finally, India is now seriously reconsidering the Most Favored Nation (MFN) status accorded by it in 1996 under the GATT where country grants a special favor like lower custom duty. But Pakistan hasn’t reciprocated citing non-tariff barriers and huge trade imbalance. Modi government is now critically reviewing all these aspects on a war-footing basis. Since perceptible outcomes are not immediate, Indian public failed to comprehend and appreciate the endeavors of NDA government.

    Over the decades, emboldened by India’s meek response to relentless terror attacks Pakistan heavily relied on its low cost warfare to inflict heavy damage on India. Unchecked, unhindered the terror outfits flourished. The surgical strikes by Indian Army are thus timely, sending strong message to war-mongers and sections of Indian public that decried leadership for its inaction. India refrained from a full-blown conventional war, as India is at the cusp to progressive economic resurgence. In the Global Competitiveness Report for 2016-17 released few days back India climbed 16 places to settle at 39 position among 138 countries, while China is ranked 28. Clearly, a conventional war might undo the recent economic gains, India rightly overcame the catch-22 kind of situation by the timely surgical strikes. Meanwhile, National Sensex crashed after the reports of strikes and suffered its worst fall post-Brexit. Despite the negative impact on trade and economy Indian Chamber of Commerce strongly supported surgical strike. Aside, retribution at this point has become inevitable to drive home the point that India is capable of defending itself and if need arises can retaliate reciprocally.

    India’s surgical strikes against Pakistan invariably reminded of Indian Army’s “Operation Hot Pursuit” conducted inside the Myanmar territory to avenge the killing of 20 military personnel by the militants of National Socialist Council of Nagaland (Khaplang) in Chandel District of Manipur. India then warned that “Western disturbances will be equally dealt with. Friendship and tolerance will go hand in hand. This is a beginning. India is Strong. This message should go to everyone” implying that India is not averse to launch such operations on its neighbors that harbor anti-Indian terror groups. However, Pakistan chose to downplay and deliberately hinted that Pakistan is not Myanmar and India shouldn’t think of any such action. These surgical strikes, a first by Indian army across LoC, undoubtedly punctured the bloated ego of Pakistan.

    As the details emerge, DGMO announced that these strikes were launched to neutralize the terror pads gearing to push infiltrators across the border and were extremely successful. In the operation that lasted for four hours, Indian paratroopers targeted ventured into 2km of PoK, and destroyed 7 launch pads. 38 terrorists and 2 Pakistan soldiers were killed. Now with Pakistan accusing India of fabrication of truth, Indian attacks might soon evade international attention. Also, since Indian operations are carried out in PoK, a legitimate Indian territory, this operation will be considered as a massive combing operation aimed at extricating militants. Moreover, presence of Pakistan soldiers at the terror dungeons confirms Pakistan’s Army is hand is glove with its illegitimate bed partners-the UN designated terrorists.

    But by all means, this retributory action would indeed propel Pakistan to retaliate with more force and India must be prepared for any eventuality. Further, these kind of action can’t force Pakistan to mend its ways. But inflicting significant damage might make enemy wary and threat of punitive retaliation will force enemy to reconsider the veracity of its clandestine activities. For the past seven decades, in various encounters with Pakistan it was proved beyond doubt that Pakistan understand the language of guns. India, by strategically executing the surgical strikes delivered the message in a language Rawalpindi clearly understands. Finally, Modi government deserves a big pat on back for walking the talk and demolishing the rhetoric. But for the exceptional valor and supreme sacrifice of Indian military India and political commitment country would be wallowing the swarm of pusillanimity.
     
  12. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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  13. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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  14. roma

    roma NRI in Europe Senior Member

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    this is one reason as to why my consistent stand has been to
    not pursue with too much vigour a chair at the UBSC high table but rather

    use our non-membership of permanent 5 to say , sorry we cant commit our resources to your backyard problems ....... the usa and uk , nato would love to have "inexpensive " troops from india at their disposal , as if it was the brit raj all over again

    so we should turn our non membership of p5 and say a nice no thanks

    instead we gotta got full steamm on the economy and G9 or perhaps G!0 membership ( minus russia but include s korea china and india as full members as soon as WE qualify )

    @Defcon 1 @Ghanteshwar @Akshay_Fenix
    @Ramdasrathsuryavanshi @vinay535
    @Darth Malgus @Rushil51
    @rishivashista13 @Ramdasrathsuryavanshi @Imaxxx
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    @Ankit Purohit @raja696 @aditya10r
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  15. IndianHawk

    IndianHawk Regular Member

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    Being at UNSC with a veto gives us quite a leverage. In realpolitik it is used as a favour to by P5 for other nations.
    Even when we face adverse revolutions we have to do lot of lobbying to block these.

    Regarding troops we are already largest contributor in peace keeping.

    Being a permanent member would increase our clout and we can still tactfully avoid getting drawn into conflicts .
    China didn't jumped in Syria while supporting Russia.

    We will naturally be in any future G10
    Being in UNSC compliments that
     
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  16. hit&run

    hit&run Elite Member Elite Member

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    Looking at extrinsic impediments and challenges is appraisal of half the picture.

    Our geo-political assertiveness that will translate into so called strategic strength or value is complimented by our internal strength.

    Before we can spread outwards and create a bigger sphere of influence we must raise the bar for all HDI markers at home.

    I am not saying there should be absolute procrastination; that we neglect power projection for sake of paying attention internally. This will be like agreeing with leftists and our detractors's fallacies when these morons mock our space program citing poverty.

    It must run parallel to our policies and action of uplifting masses out of poverty, removing bottlenecks, reform and industrialization.

    Before redeeming benefits our our strategic inertia that involves out smarting our adversaries who now know how to unsettle us internally, we must pay more attention on internal factors including internal security.
     
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  17. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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  18. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    Japan wants India to speak on South China Sea dispute: How prudent is it for New Delhi?
    [​IMG]
     
  19. PD_Solo

    PD_Solo The only one

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  20. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Errr!!!
    china has openly supported JeM chief..
    If India didnt take a stance India will lose credibility with Japan and other alliances.
    because all that muscle flexing by India will seem hollow.
    If we want other world nations to take us seriously we need to show the LEAD role in siding and settling disputes.. because other world nations are watching and taking notes.

    If we dont take a credible stance on SCS china wil think that their pressure tactic against INdia using JeM is working and that in a way is telling that china's pakistan ploy is working.
    So thats bad for India..
    This will also make pakistan very relevant for china.

    India should call the chinese bluff and stay with the INTERNATIONAL NORMS on SCS which other nations are calling for.


    In future china would use the same tactic coupled with terrorism to get things done by India.


    On NSG..china has maintained that 5 other nations are the one blocking India's bid..and its not china.
    So we have to make sure that the 5 other nations comply with us and that makes china alone blocking us...which is something china wont be able to handle for the terrorists state of pakistan.
    Close all the escape reasons china gives and china will comply..
    This attitude of china shows that china hides behind reasons and bluffs

    Pound pakistan on every attempt against India and china will themselves put Azhar on the list to save face. or get Azhar by whatever means with covert intel. and show a big middle finger to china

     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2016
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  21. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    The Pursuit of National Goals Needs Strategic Communication, Not Chaos and Noise
    In the aftermath of Uri and the surgical strikes, atavistic calls for revenge blurred the focus on terrorism as the enemy of peace and development, as well as efforts to seek a settlement of outstanding issues with Pakistan through dialogue.
    [​IMG]
    File photo of Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Credit: PTI

    Combating terrorism, a “message with no words”

    Civilians – the people in between

    A new approach to communication
     

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