India's own string of pearls: Sri Lanka, Mauritius, Seychelles and

Discussion in 'Indian Navy' started by Srinivas_K, Mar 14, 2014.

  1. Srinivas_K

    Srinivas_K Senior Member Senior Member

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    India's own string of pearls: Sri Lanka, Mauritius, Seychelles and Maldives
    [​IMG]
    On 7 March, Shiv Shankar Menon, India's National Security Advisor, announced that the Indian Ocean island states of Seychelles and Mauritius had joined India's naval arrangement with Sri Lanka and the Maldives in a new Indian Ocean security grouping that some have called the 'IO-5'.

    The new arrangement signals a significant consolidation of India's leading security role among the Indian Ocean islands. It is a manifestation of last year's announcement by Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh that henceforth India should be seen as a 'net security provider to the region.' While Mr Singh did not specify the boundaries of India's 'region' it was clear that much of the initial focus was on the Indian Ocean islands.

    India has held joint naval exercises with Sri Lanka for some years and in 2012 this was expanded to trilateral exercises with the Maldives Coast Guard. Now the Seychelles and Mauritius have joined the three in a new maritime security grouping that will cover much of the central and western Indian Ocean. Menon also foreshadowed that in future the arrangement may be expanded to encompass the Bay of Bengal or that a similar arrangement may replicated with relevant Bay of Bengal states.

    For decades India has been the de facto security guarantor of these island states. In the 1980s, India intervened or threatened intervention in Mauritius (1983), the Seychelles (1986), the Maldives (1988) and Sri Lanka (1987-1990) to prevent attempted coups or to address civil strife. India also played a significant, if largely undisclosed, role in ending the Sri Lankan civil war and the destruction of the Tamil Tigers in 2009.

    Since the 1980s, India has slowly developed a role as a maritime security provider to these states. This has included provision of patrol boats, helicopters, training, senior military secondments and hydrographic services to the Sri Lankan, Maldives , Mauritius and Seychelles navies or coast guards. Over the last few years, India has also installed coastal radar networks in the Maldives, Mauritius and Seychelles. There have also been rumours of the possible development of an Indian security presence, in one form or another, in the Maldives and Mauritius.

    The most immediate issues to be addressed by the new grouping will be the sharing of information and development of capabilities to combat maritime terrorism, piracy and illegal fishing. But these new arrangements are likely to have long term significance for India's security role throughout the Indian Ocean.

    The new security initiative follows increasing concerns in New Delhi about China's growing presence in the region, most recently including the exercise conducted by three Chinese naval vessels in the eastern Indian Ocean in January.

    The Chinese exercise was in stark contrast with India's Exercise Milan (pictured above), which was held in Port Blair in India's Andaman Islands in the Bay of Bengal only a few days later. This multilateral exercise included the navies and coastguards of some 16 states in addition to India. This year's event was the largest ever and was a truly Indo-Pacific affair, with representatives from South Asia (Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and the Maldives), many Southeast Asian states (Myanmar, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore, Cambodia and the Philippines), Australasia (Australia and New Zealand), and even a strong representation from the western Indian Ocean (Kenya, Mauritius, Seychelles and Tanzania). Exercise Milan is primarily an exercise in Indian naval diplomacy rather than an exercise for practising technical skills. Since its inception in 1995, the biennial exercise has focused on building relationships and confidence among senior naval officers of participating states.

    Exercise Milan is foremost an expression of the expansion of India's area of strategic interest as it grows as a major power, and India's interest in fostering greater defence cooperation throughout the Indian Ocean region and beyond. Milan has now become an important and highly successful part of India's growing 'soft' military power. The breadth of participants in this year's Exercise Milan, extending from East Africa to the Western Pacific, is a major demonstration of India's growing Indo-Pacific reach. The contrast between India's cooperative engagement with the region and China's unilateral demonstrations could not be starker. Indeed, it is arguable that China's unilateralism may be more indicative of strategic vulnerability in the Indian Ocean than of its strength.

    The new security partnership follows last month's announcement by India and Seychelles of a 'Blue Economy' partnership to tap the oceanic resources in the Seychelles' vast EEZ. This will rely in part on hydrographic survey work the Indian Navy has been carrying out in the Seychelles for years. Both the Seychelles and Mauritius have been pushing the 'Blue Economy' concept as a route to economic development. India may also enter into Blue Economy partnerships with Mauritius and the Maldives (both of which also have huge EEZs).

    The new maritime security arrangement between the five Indian Ocean states represents a major step forward in the region's security architecture. For the first time India has explicitly taken a security leadership role in the Indian Ocean. In presaging the possible extension or replication of such arrangements to the Bay of Bengal, New Delhi has flagged a new and much more active security role in our region.

    http://www.lowyinterpreter.org/post...ychelles-and-Maldives.aspx?COLLCC=4280602942&
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2014
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  3. laughingbuddha

    laughingbuddha Regular Member

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    Vietnam is an attractive option for naval co-operation.
    Cam Ranh Bay offers the ideal frontier for IN presence in the South China Sea and perhaps India should offer to develop and lease the old soviet naval base.
    Vietnam has shown interest in IN warships and India should seriously consider transfering the Rajputs, Brahmaputras and Godavaris to them once we have sufficient P-15A/Bs and P-17/As.
    Cam Ranh Bay is considered the finest deep water shelter in Southeast Asia and will be the ultimate base for our SSGN/SSNs.
    What a counter it will be to the chinese string of pearls.
    Now only if our war planners and policy makers get to work!
     
  4. agentperry

    agentperry Senior Member Senior Member

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    though diplomacy-wise india's outreach is increasing but i would like to point toward rapidly depleting indian navy prowess(spate of accidents in recent past, retirement of many ships lined up and delayed procurement taking away the edge Indian navy might have by this purchase/induction). the two things do not encourage Indian power display as greater engagement coupled with lesser platforms is a futile strategy
     
  5. laughingbuddha

    laughingbuddha Regular Member

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    True. However, with the modernisation of our naval yards and the participation of the private yards one hopes to see a spurt in warship building in the near future Provided the economy picks up and the MoD wakes up.
    The navy should also change its criteria of recruitment and should only enlist personnel with good physique and particularly educational qualification with the ability to adapt to technology of the day.
     
  6. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    India and Seychelles Strengthen Ties Around Maritime Security, Economic Cooperation
    India and Seychelles continue to develop the foundations for an enduring partnership in the Indian Ocean.

    India’s relationship with the Seychelles, a small Indian Ocean island state northeast of Madagascar with a population of around 90,000, is expanding. President James Michel of Seychelles was in India for a three day state visit last week that highlighted the growing links between New Delhi and Victoria. Michel last visited New Delhi on state visits in 2010 and 2005.

    Michel’s visit to New Delhi comes five months after Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi visited Seychelles on a broader tour of the Indian Ocean region–Modi also visited Sri Lanka and Mauritius. Amid growing perceptions in India that China is laying down a strategic framework around the Indian Ocean, New Delhi is making a new push to seal in its partnerships around the region.

    One of the notable outcomes of Michel’s visit to New Delhi was the conclusion of an information exchange pact, aimed at curbing tax evasion and promoting cooperation between Indian and Seychellois authorities. The India-Seychelles pact resembles similar agreements between New Delhi and other states known for their attractiveness as off-shore tax havens.

    Michel’s time in New Delhi also resulted in the conclusion of important agreements on defense and security. New Delhi gifted an interceptor coastguard boat and a Dornier surveillance aircraft during Michel’s visit. In 2011, the Indian Navy stationed one Dornier in Seychelles, in addition to a warship and a survey vessel, per a government-to-government agreement, for “exclusive economic zone surveillance and anti-piracy patrols.” The Dornier gift to Seychelles comes after Modi oversaw the launch of the MCGS Barracuda, the first India-manufactured warship built for export, in Mauritius back in March.

    “We are honored to be a partner in providing aircraft, naval vessels and coastal radar systems for strengthening surveillance capacities. Our cooperation in hydrography surveys is extensive and growing,” Modi said. In March, during his visit to Victoria, Modi oversaw the launch of the first of several planned Indian Ocean coastal surveillance radar sites in Seychelles.

    Beyond the aircraft transfer, New Delhi and Victoria will also finalized an air services agreement, and will cooperate in space, maritime resource management, weather forecasting, and disaster management.

    In strategic terms, Michel was happy to signal that Seychelles would welcome sustained Indian leadership in the Indian Ocean region. The Times of India reports that Michael, speaking in New Delhi around the theme of “Maritime Security for Blue Economy,” noted that his country was ready to join an India-led security framework for the Indian Ocean: “Seychelles is actively considering invitation by the Indian government to join the tripartite maritime security framework which encompasses India, Sri Lanka and Maldives.”

    “We cannot leave it to others to secure our maritime space. The need is more relevant than ever. Today we have with India an exemplary partnership in defence and security sectors. India’s determined and proactive action in fight against piracy is highly commendable,” Michel continued.

    “Blue economy” is a term used by Indian Ocean states to refer to a range of ocean resource management and development programs. It is also the name of Seychelles’ sustainable development model. In addition to India, Seychelles has bilateral “blue economy” partnerships with both Australia and Mauritius.

    Michel’s visit emphasizes Seychelles’ close ties to India, but that doesn’t mean that the island will be exempt from the brewing strategic rivalry in the Indian Ocean between Beijing and New Delhi. China may be interested in developing “dual-use” supply ports on Seychellois soil to support its growing anti-piracy missions in the Gulf of Aden. However, between Modi’s visit earlier this year and Michel’s last week, New Delhi currently has the strategic advantage–it doesn’t appear that Seychelles will leave India’s orbit anytime soon.

    http://thediplomat.com/2015/08/indi...round-maritime-security-economic-cooperation/
     
    sabari, Abhijat, bose and 1 other person like this.
  7. sabari

    sabari Regular Member

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    Andaman will be our magical wand .because the only thing that Chinese will care is its economy .when India build andaman they fear for navel blocked which destroy Chinese economy .which will be a good bargain tool against Chinese .
    And we should give bramhos or nirbay missile to viatnam to challenge Chinese navy in south China sea and finally we should sell air defense system , nirbay missile ,LCA because this island is the most important priority of china.
     
  8. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

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    No, India doesn't have the navy power, intelligence support and political influence to block Chinese sea lane UNLESS USA AND EVERY SOUTH EASTERN ASIAN COUNTRY JOINING IN.

    But since most south eastern Asian countries have become suppliers of components or raw materials of Chinese industries. India's block will hurt them more than Chinese. The same could be said about South Korea, Taiwan and Japan. At the mean time, as Americans and Europeans have invested so much in Chinese factories, I don't think they will take easy on India's block.

    So, good luck.

    As a country sharing hundreds kilos of land border with China, Vietnam really can't risk a war with China.
    Besides, regarding all these toys listed, Vietnamese can get from Russia, better and cheaper. The problem is they need to do lot more than just buying several fancy weapons: their training, radar net, logistics system, etc, are all decades away behind Chinese. That is why only their fish boats showing up around Chinese oil driller last year.
     
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  9. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    China will never make it out of the south China seas they would be decimated with all the bases in Japan and surrounding nations.
    Chinese naval power is non existent beyond Chinese shores.
     
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  10. SADAKHUSH

    SADAKHUSH Senior Member Senior Member

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    This will sober up the CCP/PLA. It just shows that the law of KARMA is working. Only sensible thing for China is to stop bullying her neighbours and adopt the policy of live and let live.
     
  11. sabari

    sabari Regular Member

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    Sir I made a mistake I mentioned island which is tiwan.tiwan is in need of new fighter jet which it haven yet got for decade.and the need long range missile like nirbay to strike main land of china
     
  12. sabari

    sabari Regular Member

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    In case of two front war Indian have will do what ever need to make enemy suffer and in this case navel blocked is one of the most important tactics.
    And chinese has never ever be fare in war they try to destroy our economy so there is no other option which India will have.
    If Andaman is to be the target of enemy then they need fridge,aircraft carrier to attack.amphebies vehicle.
    The weapon's that India will place.
    1 nirbay long range anti ship missile.
    2 bramhos medium range anti ship missile
    3 barak2 against aircraft and missile
    4 akash missile air defense
    5 40+ su30
    6 UAV and long range radars
    7 may be 10000 to 15000 troops
    Those are limited capablity but this is sufficient to hold the base for 3 To 6 month and which is good enough to make huge damage to Chinese economy
     
  13. sabari

    sabari Regular Member

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    If we don't utilize our base and Chinese enemy who are power then small country like srilanka, Maldives, stryches,which be a string of Pearle. is this island are super to stop Chinese aggration in indian ocean.
     
  14. bengalraider

    bengalraider DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

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    Srinivas_K likes this.
  15. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

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    If Vietnam has a possibility to buy India weapons, the chance of Taiwan is next to zero:

    1. Taiwanese doesn't trust India weapons, if Chinese weapons are still ok, then Indian products are more like joke in their eyes;
    2. Taiwanese defence strategy is building around US military intervene, military purchase is kind of protection fees, so they won't buy anything without US nod;
    3. The only hope of military aid in potential invasion from Mainland is USA, so they have to make sure their weapon system can work perfectly with US forces, obviously Indian weapons can't do that.
     
  16. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

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    Unless both sides want to have a long war, Neither India, nor China, has the necessary air force to destroy enemy's ECONOMY in a short period. I doubt if USA can do that only with military power.

    If India's block works, the jets and warships from India mainland can do that more efficiently than Andaman, so taking off Andaman doesn't help;
    If India's block doesn't work, then there is no need to attack Andaman.
     
  17. angeldude13

    angeldude13 Lestat De Lioncourt Senior Member

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    Chinese navy is bogged down.
    They have to cope up with Japanese and American navy in the Pacific and south China sea.
    I don't think they have the resources to play games with Indian navy in Indian ocean while trying to match America and Japan in the pacific.
     
  18. blueblood

    blueblood Senior Member Senior Member

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    Note.jpg

    A giant LOL at the people who think India need to match China 1 on 1 to deter.

    In case of China, the above graph does not include US navy and RAN.

    In case of India, none of the neighbours are hostile to India except Pakistan and difference will continue to rise at a neck breaking speed.
     
  19. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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  20. blueblood

    blueblood Senior Member Senior Member

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    2011-12-03 LOL :biggrin2:

    India Signs 4 Agreements with Seychelles to Boost Security Cooperation

    http://www.ndtv.com/india-news/indi...ychelles-to-boost-security-cooperation-745742

    LOL :biggrin2:

    India-Bangladesh Border Deal Signals Deeper Ties—and Trouble for China

    http://www.worldpoliticsreview.com/...eal-signals-deeper-ties-and-trouble-for-china

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-33033342

    http://www.hindustantimes.com/india...emorable-moment-in-ties/article1-1355889.aspx

    Bangladesh, which did not send many military officers earlier to India is now deputing several personnel for training in India. India-Bangladesh relations have seen a marked improvement since 2009 and service chiefs and high-ranking officials from both countries have been visiting each other's country in the last few years.

    http://articles.economictimes.india...defence-cooperation-african-countries-myanmar

    LOL :biggrin2:

    http://www.geo.tv/article-188952-Sri-Lanka-denies-reports-of-buying-JF-17-Thunder-jets-from-Pakistan


    LOL :biggrin2:

    In Nepal's hour of crisis, India opens border; illegal immigration can wait

    http://www.deccanchronicle.com/1504...dia-opens-border-illegal-immigration-can-wait

    Nepal’s overwhelmed government has been criticized by frustrated residents, hundreds of thousands of whom are desperate for assistance after last Saturday’s monster earthquake. However, foreign countries, with their medics, specialist rescuers and helicopter sorties, have won applause, with giant neighbor India sometimes singled out for praise as the biggest provider.

    “We are hungry, we have no food, and we’ve had no help from our own government,” Arjun Budhathoki, 30, said as he lined up, along with thousands of others, for a bus out of Kathmandu this week.

    “The Indian government is the only one helping our citizens, they are doing so much for us,” Budhathoki said.

    China has dispatched about 300 personnel to Nepal and announced about US$10 million in aid so far, according to state media.

    Indian Air Force alone has sent 950 personnel and dropped more than 400 tonnes of aid across the country.

    http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/world/archives/2015/05/02/2003617309/1

    ............................................................................................

    Apparently there is a difference between your defintion of "hostile" and mine. :lol:
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2015
  21. blueblood

    blueblood Senior Member Senior Member

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    Colombo’s backslide toward Delhi began during Sri Lanka’s 2014 election campaign. The opposition used allegedly corrupt deals made between Rajapaksa and Beijing as a campaign tool. This already suggests a public relations defeat for the People’s Republic.

    Following its election win, the new Sri Lankan government touted the strengthening of ties with India, and made little effort to conceal the shift away from China.

    This is a particularly acute failure for China given that Beijing had a powerful story it could have told the Sri Lankan public. Namely, that China was there when no one else was. The civil war between Sri Lanka’s government and Tamil Tiger rebels was Asia’s longest. Governments came and went. The pivotal factor in Colombo’s ultimate victory over the Tamil Tigers was not domestic (though the 2005 tsunami played a role). It was external: the rise of China.

    http://www.brookings.edu/blogs/order-from-chaos/posts/2015/05/01-china-india-sri-lanka-pethiyagoda
     

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