India's network centric warfare

Discussion in 'Strategic Forces' started by LETHALFORCE, Jan 17, 2012.

  1. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

    Joined:
    May 26, 2010
    Messages:
    30,857
    Likes Received:
    38,693
    Location:
    BHARAT, INDIA, HINDUSTHAN
    Inspired by nature, scientists develop artificial neural network models

    [​IMG]

    Bangalore: Want new ideas? Log on to nature! Well, this could be the in-thing Indian defence scientists are wedded to, while exploring the mesmerising possibilities of Artificial Intelligence (AI). The Centre for Artificial Intelligence and Robotics (CAIR), the focal point of this series, is developing AI network models that emulate the computing style of intelligence inherent in nature. “Nature’s creations consist of highly complex systems. The human brain’s Neural Network is an example. The brain is able to perform complex tasks by simultaneous computations, based on sophisticated signalling between neurons. Swarm Intelligence is another example of collective intelligence seen in nature, most commonly in bees and termites,” say sources.While computer science has progressed considerably, accurately mimicking nature and making them exhibit any significant degree of perception or intelligence, still remains beyond our reach. Increase in computation power has not yet helped in intelligent cognition. Computational intelligence offers the mechanism of ‘learning’ algorithms that arrive at solutions based on ‘experience’, much like a human does.“The powerful train-by-example paradigm allows the algorithm to learn based on encountered data, obviating the need for complex classification metrics. In this paradigm, labelled training data is provided to the neural network model, which ‘learns’ to give the correct responses, even for those inputs not previously encountered,” say sources.Data mining toolbox: A good data mining tool must discover patterns in data. These can then be used to make predictions. However, the biggest problem with military data is that it is unstructured. The state-of-the-art toolbox for doing Pattern Recognition and Knowledge Handling developed at the CAIR is said to be effective for intelligence analysis and decision support in Net Centric Operations.“It can lend cognitive capabilities to a software defined radio and provide speech and speaker recognition engines. It can autonomously sort the vast amount of information received, impossible for human analysts to collate and analyse. It rejects incorrect or spurious inputs, collates usable inputs and creates inferences under the relevant topic heads,” sources said.Swarm Intelligence Algorithms are another example of AI mimicking nature. Scientists at the CAIR has developed a site selection algorithm based on the simple, distributed nest construction behaviour of termites with no central control or supervision. “The swarm behaviour has been improvised upon to create a geographical site selection tool used to select suitable sites for any kind of requirement off a digital map, typically military deployments. The algorithm examines a designated area for suitability based on the termite behaviour patterns, using pre-fed logic, and displays selected areas on a geo-spatial information system (GIS) display,” sources said.

    Tarmak007 -- A bold blog on Indian defence: Inspired by nature, scientists develop artificial neural network models
     
  2. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

    Joined:
    May 26, 2010
    Messages:
    30,857
    Likes Received:
    38,693
    Location:
    BHARAT, INDIA, HINDUSTHAN
    Reasoning-based Artificial Intelligence to aid military decision-making

    [​IMG]

    Bangalore: A critical manifestation of human intelligence is the ability to reason, to be able to decide in the face of choices, the ability to discover patterns. These capabilities have a huge payoff in the military context. Hence, a critical application of artificial intelligence (AI) is in the context of reasoning, which is touched upon in simple terms in this part of the series.Modern military decision making involves choosing between various emerging choices in the backdrop of a continuous stream of abundant information. This complexity is almost paralyzing to the human being and is also called information overload. Reasoning techniques using AI developed at the Centre for Artificial Intelligence and Robotics (CAIR) can be a great support, as they can automate many of these tasks.
    Another important area is that of military planning. This involves creating a winning strategy in the game of war. “Creating a winning strategy in a far simpler game like chess has been an enigma. Winning strategies for military are far more complex problems. Planning begins to fail, if one needs to strategise under severe time constraints – something that an intelligent and resourceful adversary can create. This is another area that can be supported using AI techniques developed at CAIR,” say sources.Effective and actionable intelligence creation is both a military and a national need. This has been seen both during Kargil as well as Mumbai. The key problems have been that intelligence is a multi-domain problem, and the information from sensors and agents is usually raw. “This requires humongous human effort to categorize, collate and synthesize information into actionable intelligence – leading to issues of timeliness. The CAIR has established tools that can significantly automate this task,” says sources.Another aspect of intelligence is to be able to decipher the social network of an adversarial organization. Social network analysis provides insights about the key role players as well as the chains of command. This information has very significant military usage. The scientists have developed solutions that can analyse social networks, and visually represent them for military decision-making.Finally, robotic intelligence, the dream of science fiction – is the amalgamation of AI and robotics into cyborgs. The CAIR has pioneered this effort in India, and has created intelligent robots that can perform a class of complex tasks autonomously.

    Tarmak007 -- A bold blog on Indian defence: Reasoning-based Artificial Intelligence to aid military decision-making
     
  3. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

    Joined:
    May 26, 2010
    Messages:
    30,857
    Likes Received:
    38,693
    Location:
    BHARAT, INDIA, HINDUSTHAN
    Indigenous Geographical Information System for military applications ready

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Bangalore: Geographical Information Systems (GIS) play a crucial role in operation planning, execution and monitoring of progress by Armed Forces by showing all entities of interest in the context of a map. The GIS provides spatial information platform such as digital maps, digital elevation maps and satellite images to visualize the operation scenario. This would help enable the disposition of enemy deployments and better planning of own forces' deployment.
    Most of the GIS applications used by Indian armed forces are based on commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) software. These COTS GIS come with strict licensing policy and are prone to technology denial. Their interoperability with other GIS systems for exchange of spatial information is limited. To overcome these challenges and pitfalls of COTS GIS, the Centre for Artificial Intelligence and Robotics (CAIR) has undertaken a project to develop home-grown GIS software for military applications, christened as INDIGIS.“The INDIGIS is a suite of GIS components which are customizable, scalable and data centric. It meets the specific GIS requirements of a collaborative defense environment. The INDIGIS component suite can be customized to build military GIS applications to facilitate planning, execution, monitoring and support of military operations. It offers a common platform for display, analysis and decision support involving spatio-temporal data for Net Centric Operation (NCO) systems,” sources said.Indigenous GIS kernel has been developed as a library of software components to cover the following major function. They are: a) processing of geo-spatial data in various formats of interest to Indian military; b) creation and management of a portable military symbol library; c) geo-spatial data exchange, analysis and visualization with various Tactical Command Control Communication and Intelligence (TacC3I) systems; d) analysis and visualization of data from military sensors like GPS, digital compass, Battlefield Surveillance Radar, echo- sounder and unmanned aerial vehicles; f) support for all the usual features of COTS GIS including analysis and visualization of geo-spatial data in 2D and 3D, management of user created spatial data layers (overlays) and simulation modeling and decision support aids for spatial data analysis.


    INDIGIS FEATURES
    * Spatial data interoperability support for majority of commonly-used map and image data formats
    * Scale space visualization for retrieval and rendering of spatial data (raster and vector)
    * On the fly projection map data with read-outs.
    * Seamless integrated visualization and analysis of topographic -hydrographic data.
    * Map updation and trafficabilitity analysis for cross-country movements.
    * Integrated tools for military specific requirements like image processing, spatial decision support aids, and modeling tools.
    * Portable military symbol library that caters for the requirements of the 3 Services.
    * Support for Linux and Windows Operating Systems.


    http://tarmak007.blogspot.in/2012/02/indigenous-geographical-information.html
     
    LETHALFORCE likes this.
  4. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

    Joined:
    May 26, 2010
    Messages:
    30,857
    Likes Received:
    38,693
    Location:
    BHARAT, INDIA, HINDUSTHAN
    Ad-hoc network for futuristic warfare scenario warming up

    [​IMG]

    Bangalore: For over the last one decade, Bangalore has been the hub of R&D in military communication with the scientists from the Centre for Artificial Intelligence and Robotics (CAIR) leading the march on this front. Focus has been on the R&D of wireless ad-hoc networks, which are wireless, decentralized and infrastructure less (unlike cellular networks). Ad-hoc network consists of nodes which are capable of executing computations and data exchanges amongst their peers. Hence, the nodes in an ad-hoc network function very much like a router in a conventional computer network.Two important ad-hoc networks of use in military scenario are Mobile Ad-Hoc Networks (MANETs) and Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN). The former is characterized by the high mobility of nodes providing data or voice communication amongst nodes, while the latter is a relatively static network with its nodes equipped with sensors whose choice depend on the application.“MANETs serve to provide voice and data communication amongst roaming entities such as dismounted platoon of soldiers, inter-battlefield tank communications etc. Their role is not limited to application on ground as nodes of a MANET can be located on land, on sea or in the air. Providing such a voice and data communication capability would provide sharing of situational awareness amongst battlefield entities like dismounted soldiers, battlefield tanks and military aircraft,” say sources.MANET is formed by mobile communicating nodes, interconnected by wireless communication links. It is self-configuring upon changes in topology occurring due to the random movement of communicating nodes. The main features of MANET are: a) routes between nodes may contain multiple hops; b) rapidly deployable due to self-configuring capability; c) dynamic changes in network topology. Among the challenges are: limited wireless transmission range, packet losses due to transmission errors and, operational requirements under energy constraints. Ongoing work in the above area focuses on the development of communication protocols with power awareness.WSNs serve to provide surveillance capabilities through appropriate sensors located in nodes that are geographically distributed. “This network is characterized by low power, unattended nodes that interact in a cooperative manner to perform their assigned tasks. Introduction of inexpensive, micro-sized devices which serve to act as a node in a WSN has revolutionized the applications of WSN ranging from simple civilian to complex battlefield applications. An important application of WSN is in providing perimeter security for the detection of intrusion by humans and vehicles into a geographical area monitored by a WSN,” say sources.Scientists say that MANETs and WSNs throw several challenges to those involved in their design. MANETs require complex routing strategy to provide highly reliable communication amongst the nodes. In the case of WSNs the challenge lies in routing under severely constrained energy availability. The R&D efforts of the CAIR are directed towards realization of feasible, reliable, secure MANETs and WSNs.

    Tarmak007 -- A bold blog on Indian defence: Ad-hoc network for futuristic warfare scenario warming up
     
    LETHALFORCE likes this.
  5. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

    Joined:
    May 26, 2010
    Messages:
    30,857
    Likes Received:
    38,693
    Location:
    BHARAT, INDIA, HINDUSTHAN
  6. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

    Joined:
    May 26, 2010
    Messages:
    30,857
    Likes Received:
    38,693
    Location:
    BHARAT, INDIA, HINDUSTHAN
    Becoming Network-centric

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. cobra commando

    cobra commando Tharki regiment Veteran Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2009
    Messages:
    10,793
    Likes Received:
    12,982
    Location:
    Oblivion
    1st Picture Of India's Military Communication Satellite - INSAT-4F


    A Communication Satellite believed to be built solely to cater to the communication requirements of the Indian Armed Forces, especially the Navy. One knows almost as much today, as one knew a year back, about this satellite , which is, very little. After years of delay in its commissioning, this ISRO-built GSAT-7 [INSAT-4F] satellite is finally set for launch using Arianespace's Ariane 5 rocket, Mission VA215, scheduled for this month [ August 29, tentatively]. This picture released by the launch company shows the satellite undergoing inspections prior to being mounted on the launch vehicle.

    [​IMG]

    The month of August will see ISRO engaged in undertaking two highly significant missions. Besides this first such satellite, it has also announced a demonstration launch of its more advanced Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle, the Mark II version, mission GSLV-D5, scheduled for August 19. Adding to it critical nature is the fact that it would be equipped with an indigenously designed Cryogenic Upper Stage [CUS] engine, essential for generating higher thrust needed to launch heavier satellites from within India itself. Its launch has witnessed a long hiatus after the previous mission, also a demonstration, one using Russian supplied engine, did not achieve objectives.


    1st Picture Of India's Military Communication Satellite - INSAT-4F [Image Of The Day] [UPDATED: 2013.08.06] - AA Me, IN
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2014
  8. cobra commando

    cobra commando Tharki regiment Veteran Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2009
    Messages:
    10,793
    Likes Received:
    12,982
    Location:
    Oblivion
    Kunal Biswas likes this.
  9. cobra commando

    cobra commando Tharki regiment Veteran Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2009
    Messages:
    10,793
    Likes Received:
    12,982
    Location:
    Oblivion
    Network Centric Warfare

    No matter the advancements in robotics, the importance of the ‘man behind the machine’ will remain relevant. This is equally applicable to Network Centric Warfare (NCW). The success of NCW rests on the idea that information is only useful if it enables more effective action. Significantly, the key to success of NCW is not technology but people who will use it – the human dimension, which is based on professional mastery and mission command requiring high standards of training, education, doctrine, organisation and leadership. It is about the way people collaborate to share their awareness of the situation in order to fight more effectively. The human dimension of NCW is complex, difficult to conceptualise and defence forces all over the globe are struggling with the issue, experimenting to achieve breakthroughs in varied measure.

    The Issue
    The role of information in NCW is clear but much needs to be understood how human beings share, absorb and make sense of available information and then make decisions based on that information. Simply increasing the amount of information available to commanders does not necessarily result in improved knowledge nor help them make better decisions. The premise, that more information is better, is not always true. Though gathering information enhances intelligence, it also must aid understanding and decision making. Coupled with the aspect of information are issues such as understanding the power of the applications itself, for example, knowing properties and limitations of the Decision Support System (DSS).

    Read more here-
    Network Centric Warfare » Indian Defence Review
     
  10. lion

    lion Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2013
    Messages:
    95
    Likes Received:
    38
    Location:
    Inida
    Excellent post lethal force...:thumb:
     
  11. cobra commando

    cobra commando Tharki regiment Veteran Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2009
    Messages:
    10,793
    Likes Received:
    12,982
    Location:
    Oblivion
    GSAT-7 bolsters Indian Navy's Network Centric Warfare (NCW) capability

    Effective maritime domain awareness (MDA) in the Indian Ocean Region (IOR) is a strategic imperative for the Indian Navy (IN). Achieving this goal dovetails with IN's continuing evolution as a network-centric force with consistent investment being made in various command, control, communications, computers and intelligence, surveillance, targeting and reconnaissance (C4ISTAR) programs. IN's emerging network centric warfare (NCW) ethos ultimately paves the way towards true MDA by providing a core around which broader inter-agency networks can be built. The need to manage dispersed forces operating across wide expanses of ocean while keeping them informed is driving IN more than ever before to pursue space based initiatives as reflected by the operationalization of the GSAT-7 satellite whose efficacy was validated in the TROPEX series of exercises conducted earlier this year. IN's desire to operate a large fleet of nuclear submarines in the years ahead will only heighten its need to exploit space for NCW goals as well as spur further domestic development of very long range communication systems. In recent years, IN has inducted a range of new ISR platforms including the Boeing P-8I Neptune and a host of UAVs besides upgrading older reconnaissance assets with new electronics to considerably augment its inventory of network capable platforms.


    Read more:
    Saurav Jha's Blog : GSAT-7 bolsters Indian Navy's Network Centric Warfare (NCW) capability
     
    Kunal Biswas likes this.
  12. charlie

    charlie Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
    919
    Likes Received:
    698
    We need to develop our own switches and router like china did, they are removing all cisco network equipments from sensetive areas. Though the replacing equipment is far inferior to Cisco but they made sure that their network cannot be hacked easily our whole network is being designed by Cisco(consultant)

    I don't know why we need to to follow TCP/IP format, we can build our own format & our own protocol, even if enemies hack our network they will never be able to translate the data.
     
  13. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    21,486
    Likes Received:
    8,424
    Kunal Biswas likes this.
  14. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    21,486
    Likes Received:
    8,424
  15. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    21,486
    Likes Received:
    8,424
  16. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    21,486
    Likes Received:
    8,424
  17. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2013
    Messages:
    7,368
    Likes Received:
    8,331
    Location:
    India
    Here’s How Countries Like China, Russia Control Online Dissent

    Look at the physical systems that make up internet infrastructure, and you find a network that is a lot more centralized than you might think.

    In January 2011, protests broke out across Egypt to demand an end to the despotic and repressive regime of Hosni Mubarak. The protests were largely organized online, through social networks like Twitter and Facebook. Mubarak quickly realized this, and launched a counterattack: He severed all access to the internet from within Egypt.

    Dyn Research, a internet performance company that analyzes how the internet performs, noted that Egypt’s Arab Spring shutdown started with just a couple phone calls from the government:

    The prior day [before the internet shutdown], we had received a tip from an Egyptian telecom engineer that the government was warning some telecoms that they should be prepared to act quickly if the government ordered the shutdown of internet services. Just after midnight local time in Egypt, that order came and nearly all Egyptian access to the global internet was down in a matter of minutes.

    This is what the Egyptian internet looked like after those phone calls.

    [​IMG]

    Mubarak’s successful internet shutdown reveals the way we understand the internet is something of a paradox: On one hand, it looks like decentralized anarchy, a place where anyone can create and share information, and where these data make their way seamlessly from one user to another. But if that were the case, how could a country so easily turn off the entire internet overnight?

    When you look at the physical systems that make up internet infrastructure, you find a network that is a lot more centralized than you might think. Users may access the internet through any number of networks, usually controlled by Internet Service Providers (ISPs), universities, or businesses. But on their way from point A to point B, they almost always have to stop at centrally located routing systems that handle huge amounts of traffic.

    It is at these internet choke points that data become centralized, even if it is just passing through. The existence of these central servers is good news for the likes of Mubarak, by making it trivial to censor, spy on, or shut down the internet. In a more open ecosystem, no single entity—governmental, corporate, or otherwise—has access to enough of the traffic being sent along to exercise its will over the internet. And if the ecosystem is competitive, internet users can choose to abandon a provider that is known to be spying or censoring.

    But we know that many countries are not open. Egypt in 2011 is a clear example. China, Iran, and others are known to regularly censor content and cut off sections of the internet. This is because, when the physical routes traffic takes are severely limited, it endangers the free flow of information the internet was supposed to provide.

    Researchers at Harvard attempted to identify these choke points, and determine how easily a given country could control its internet. Theirresearch, published in 2011, analyzed data collected by the Center for Applied Internet Data Analysis on trace routes—actual paths taken by data transferred across the web. The resulting data come with some caveats: the particulars are a few years out of date, though they make up the most recent comprehensive, country-by-country analysis. Also, because there is no single source of data on internet routes, the methods they used to identify paths only produce an approximation of what the actual internet looks like. Still, this research provides a useful way of seeing how internet control works.

    Arab spring: Egypt 2011
    Let’s revisit the Arab Spring shutdown of 2011. The Harvard researchers identified three “points of control” for Egypt. They define these as the minimum number of points that together account for at least 90% of Egypt’s IP addresses, the unique numbers assigned to each device on the internet. Nearly all the paths data can take to get into or out of the country go through these three points. Each of these points represents an “Autonomous System,” or AS, each of which is responsible for sending data along to either another AS or, eventually, an end user.

    If you live in Egypt, your home internet might connect via a local ISP like Yalla Online. But in order to access some part of the internet outside the country—like Facebook or Twitter—Yalla’s connection needs to first pass through a major AS, in this case one controlled by LinkDotNet, a larger ISP. The same happens for various other ISPs, businesses, or other networks, making LinkDotNet’s AS a gatekeeper between the internet inside and outside Egypt.

    [​IMG]

    The largest AS shown here belongs to the Egyptian offshoot of Etisalat, a large telecom operator based in the United Arab Emirates. According to the researchers’ data, over 58% of Egypt’s IP addresses pass through the Etisalat AS. Again, this figure is just an approximation, but it shows the outsized influence of this point in Egypt’s network.

    [​IMG]

    So to cut off nearly all of his citizens from Facebook, Twitter, and other sites, Mubarak only had to sever the global connections of these few AS’s.

    China’s choke points
    Egypt is not the only country with just a few choke points. Another is China, notorious for censorship and surveillance of the internet. China has had its share of blackouts, too: ethnic rioting in western China caused the government to completely cut off internet to the western region of Xinjiang for 10 whole months. The research estimates that nearly 75% of Chinese IP addresses go through AS number 4134, Chinanet-Backbone, the world’s 15th-largest AS in terms of the number of IPs it serves.

    [​IMG]

    Chinanet-Backbone is known to be a point at which China performs filtering, preventing certain kinds of information from entering or leaving the country. A 2011 paper (pdf) from researchers at the University of Michigan found that, of all the AS networks in the country, the Chinanet AS, and those of its branch companies across China, were responsible for more filtering than any others. (China’s large internal Internet Exchange Points, or IXPs, are also believed to be major points of filtering and censorship, but don’t appear in most data looking at internet traffic because they normally appear as a direct transfer from one AS to another.)

    “Resistant” countries
    Centralization is not the default for a country’s internet systems, though. Dyn Research used the AS data it collected independently to assess how difficult it would be to disconnect a given country from the internet. It divided countries into four categories: “Severe risk” of internet disconnection, “significant risk,” “low risk,” and “resistant.” This is what the networks of six “resistant” countries look like, according to the Harvard research:

    [​IMG]

    These countries have several things in common: they are all democracies, so it would be harder for their heads of state to get Mubarak-levels of authority to shut down the entire internet. (The researchers chose not to analyze the United States because that country has a very high number of IP addresses not allocated to actual internet users, making data on the importance of an AS unreliable.) But even if the Singaporean or Canadian president got approval to do so, there are many more opportunities for companies or organizations that provide access to the internet outside the country to refuse the order or find ways around it.

    The “resistant” countries also have relatively vibrant and competitive economies. This ensures that no single, monopolistic ISP becomes large enough to be a single access point to the outside. A country for which this seems to be the case is South Korea, which Dyn categorized as “low risk” rather than “resistant.” The Harvard data show South Korea’s internet to be heavily centralized, even though the country is ardently democratic. The largest AS there belongs to Korea Telecom—one of the largest of the country’s massive pseudo-monopolies known as chaebol—which serves over 40% of Korean broadband subscribers.

    Russia’s radical decentralization
    There is a final structure a country’s internet can take: a radically decentralized one. This is the case with Russia, which, given its president’s authoritarian tendencies, may surprise you.

    [​IMG]

    The best explanation for this is cybercrime. A 2007 study of the Russian Business Network, a massive cybercrime operation based in St. Petersburg, creates “a nebulous network to blur the understanding of their activities.” By creating intentionally complex systems, cybercriminals can both hide their tracks and make their systems very difficult to shut down from the outside. The trade-off with such a system is that Russia loses some ability to track and censor its networks. So while Russia may be consider a larger threat to the US than China when it comes to cybercrime, Russia has at the same time been soliciting China for advice on how to structure its internet.

    The shape of a national internet system reflects a country’s values, much like its economic policies or laws. Should the power of the internet be distributed across the country, or a tool a government or company can use to its advantage? Mubarak chose the latter, angering his citizens enough to get him thrown into prison. China’s internet czars choose the same, allowing local internet companies to flourish, but severely restricting the information available to people in the country.

    It’s easy to think of our relationship to the internet as primarily about the software that connects us to it, like apps and web browsers. The great thing about software is that it is easy to change. If a browser has a bug, it can be fixed overnight. If an app starts asking for access to too much of your data, you can uninstall it.

    But underneath all internet software is physical hardware. Once in place, this infrastructure establishes how users access information, and who gets to see that information. This physical internet is being shaped by a battle between two diverging trends: Governments and companies that want more control over data, and the flattening of internet infrastructure. China has been a loud advocate of”internet sovereignty,” the idea that each country should be able to essentially exist entirely on its own network. Huge ISPs like Comcast and Verizon have been accused of treating their own services differently, leveraging the massive networks they control. Centralization of the internet allows the likes of the National Security Agency to spy on traffic by getting large companies to agree, as happened with AT&T.

    A decentralized internet, meanwhile, means that no one entity has the power to shape the internet toward its own advantage. It makes censorship, surveillance, and internet shutdowns much more difficult. It makes the internet ecosystem more competitive, and it likely makes the internet faster, allowing connections to take the best route instead of the only route.

    As more and more of what we do every day happens online, the way this battle plays out will determine how easy it is for governments and companies to shape our lives.[​IMG]

    http://www.defenseone.com/technolog...a-control-online-dissent/132123/?oref=d-river
     
  18. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2013
    Messages:
    7,368
    Likes Received:
    8,331
    Location:
    India
    The CIA Says It Can Predict Social Unrest as Early as 3 to 5 Days Out


    The reason: a dramatic improvement in analytics, cloud computing and ‘deep learning.’

    What a difference 12 months can make.

    Last year around this time, CIA stood up its first new office since 1963—the Directorate for Digital Innovation—a seismic shift for the agency that legitimized the importance of technology, including big data and analytics.

    According to Deputy Director for Digital Innovation Andrew Hallman, the man tapped by CIA Director John Brennan to run the digital wing, that digital pivot is paying off.

    The agency, Hallman said, has significantly improved its “anticipatory intelligence,” using a mesh of sophisticated algorithms and analytics against complex systems to better predict the flow of everything from illicit cash to extremists around the globe. Deep learning and other forms of machine learning can help analysts understand how seemingly disparate data sets might be linked or lend themselves to predicting future events with national security ramifications.

    While intelligence analysts have access to CIA’s own classified data stores to sift through, they’re also increasingly turning to open data sets, which Brennan has said this summer have turned into a “tremendous advantage” for the agency.

    “We have, in some instances, been able to improve our forecast to the point of being able to anticipate the development of social unrest and societal instability some I think as near as three to five days out,” said Hallman, speaking Tuesday at The Next Tech event hosted by Government Executive and Nextgov. The event is a part of the four-day Fedstival, which aims to look at “what’s next” for the federal government in technology and management.

    “What we’re trying to do within a unit of my directorate is leverage what we know from social sciences on the development of instability, coups and financial instability, and take what we know from the past six or seven decades and leverage what is becoming the instrumentation of the globe,” Hallman added.

    Think of it like James Bond beefing up his arsenal over the decades. In the 1960s, 007 carried around his trusty Walther PPK and not much else. By 2015’s “Spectre,” Bond wears an implanted transmitter, uses a laser microphone and accesses an automated surveillance technology system that vacuums up all sources of intelligence. Of course, he still has that classic Walther PPK—it’s now outfitted with an optical palm reader, so only Bond can fire it.

    CIA’s transformation is about agents in the field who “have more agility and understanding of digital awareness.” The agency also employs cloud computing and other technologies to make sense of growing amounts of data.

    And that’s better for analysts and operatives as well as the policymakers they inform, Hallman said.

    Whereas policymakers and key leadership have held decades-long confidence in intelligence attained from traditional spycraft, Hallman said until recently, it was “much harder to convey confidence for the policymaker who may make an important decision from advanced analytics with deep learning algorithms.”

    However, with the inception of the digital directorate, that’s changed. Hallman said analysts are “becoming more proficient in articulating” observations to policymakers derived in these new ways. What it adds up to, Hallman said, is a clearer picture of events unfolding—or about to unfold—in an increasingly unclear world.[​IMG]

    http://www.defenseone.com/technolog...nrest-early-3-5-days-out/132121/?oref=d-river
     
  19. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

    Joined:
    May 26, 2010
    Messages:
    30,857
    Likes Received:
    38,693
    Location:
    BHARAT, INDIA, HINDUSTHAN
    Lets keep this thread to the topic of India`s Net centric capabilities ..
     
  20. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2013
    Messages:
    7,368
    Likes Received:
    8,331
    Location:
    India
    India, Russia May Ink Cyber-Security Pact Next Week


    India and Russia have been working on closer coordination to combat radicalization through social media by groups like Islamic State as well as Pakistan-based outfits like LeT, Hizbul Mujahideen and Jaish-e-Mohammed
    by Dipanjan Roy Chaudhury

    NEW DELHI: India and Russia will likely sign a cyber-security pact during Russian President Vladimir Putin's trip to Goa next week, cementing joint efforts to curb terror-related activities in the region.

    Officials of both countries said a pact in this regard is expected to be announced at the Indo-Russian annual summit in Goa on October 15. India had entered into a comprehensive cyber security relationship with the US, another permanent member of the UN Security Council, during the Commercial and Strategic Dialogue in August.

    India and Russia have been working on closer coordination to combat radicalization through social media by groups like Islamic State as well as Pakistan-based outfits like LeT, Hizbul Mujahideen and Jaish-e-Mohammed. :india: :russia:

    Ways to check online propaganda and recruitment by such groups, and keeping hackers from sabotaging critical infrastructure are among the issues that will be high up on the agenda for Putin and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi when they meet for the Indo-Russian Annual Summit. Last year, the two countries had decided to form an expert group on cyber security and counter-terrorism.

    At the summit next week, which will focus on counter-terror measures, there will be sharing of experience and expertise in the field of counter-terrorism training, the officials cited earlier said, requesting anonymity. While Russia is at the forefront of fighting the Islamic State in Syria, India had cases of youth being lured through social media to join the group.

    Also, in restive Kashmir, Pakistan-based terror groups have used social media aggressively to fuel crisis since July. Meanwhile, according to Russia-based software security group Kaspersky Lab, at least 30 strategically important organisations across countries in Asia and Africa have already suffered from cyber criminal groups’ attacks. According to Kaspersky Lab researchers, the high cost, complexity and duration of the attacks give grounds to assume that the attackers have support at the government level.
    Source>>


    India and Russia faces the same problem through NGOs...
    NGOs will organize anti national campaign and they get outside support through SOCIAL MEDIAs to add fuel to the fire.
     

Share This Page