India's network centric warfare

Discussion in 'Strategic Forces' started by LETHALFORCE, Jan 17, 2012.

  1. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    India developing network centric warfare capability: Naik - The Economic Times

    India developing network centric warfare capability

    NEVADA: India is rapidly moving towards developing network centric warfare (NCW) capability, Vice Chief of Air Staff Air Marshal P V Naik has said.

    "NCW is vital. You cannot survive today for long against a good adversary without this capability," said Indian Air Marshal at the Nellis Air Force Base, where IAF is participating in the prestigious Red Flag exercise.

    Speaking to journalists after celebrating the Independence Day with Indian airmen, he said the Indian armed forces will have this capability by 2010-2011.

    "At present we do not have it, we are just about network enabled. But we are in the process of developing this capability."

    Pioneered by the United States Department of Defence, NCW relies on computer processing power and networking communications technology to provide shared information of the battle space among armed forces. This shared awareness increases synergy for command and control, resulting in superior decision- making, and the ability to coordinate complex military operations over long distances for an overwhelming war-fighting advantage.

    Providing further details about Indian efforts towards network centricity, Air Marshal Naik said the backbone of this entire system will be a fibre optic-based network called Air Force Network (AFNET), on which will be riding the Integrated Air Command and Control Systems (IACCS). IACCS will provide the connectivity for all the airborne platforms and ground platforms.
     
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  3. LETHALFORCE

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    IAF Focusing On Network-Centric Warfare Capabilities | AVIATION WEEK

    IAF Focusing On Network-Centric Warfare Capabilities

    The Indian Air Force turned 78 on Oct. 8, and just two weeks later the IAF held its four-day biannual Commanders’ Conference Oct. 26-29, touching on issues ranging from operational preparedness and philosophies to maintenance, upgrades, HR, acquisition, and administration. As part of its aggressive modernization mission, the IAF is waiting in the wings to acquire new assets and upgrade some of its fleets. “We need to continuously train and evolve to become a capability-based force. We are honing our skills in cyberwarfare and concentrating on building network-centric warfare capabilities to boost our combat efficacy,” Chief of Air Staff Air Chief Marshal P.V. Naik tells Aviation Week’s Senior Aerospace and Defense Correspondent (India) Anantha Krishnan M. during the India Thought Leader (ITL) interview series. This interview mainly focuses on IAF’s philosophies toward its air warriors, support for homegrown projects and readiness to take on future challenges.



    AW: IAF has grown one more year old this October. What are the challenges the air warriors will face in the next 5-10 years?



    P.V.N.: I would say that the IAF has matured one more year. And this maturity is accentuated in the way we continue to evolve our warfighting doctrines and training methodologies, with a greater emphasis on harnessing the potential of human resources to achieve our objectives. Air warriors in the IAF are alive to the ever-changing strategic environment. As you know, we have embarked upon an all-round modernization plan which aims to replenish our fleets, upgrade airfield infrastructure and acquire modern radars and weapon systems. Therefore, one of the major challenges is the co-habitation factor – that of maintaining the existing fleet and, at the same time, assimilating the modern technologies coming our way. We are fortunate to have a highly professional HR pool – one which is rich in exposure and has demonstrated a great deal of adaptability in absorbing modern technologies. We are also honing our skills in cyberwarfare and concentrating on building network-centric warfare capabilities to boost our combat efficacy. In a nutshell, we will need to continuously train and evolve to become a capability-based force, one which is more than capable to meet all the challenges of the future.



    AW: Often we read media reports and comments being made by senior IAF officials about the depleted squadron strength of IAF. What are the quick steps that need to be taken to strengthen the IAF?



    P.V.N.: It’s a known fact that the IAF’s fighter fleet is depleting due to phasing out of MiG-21 and MiG-23 aircraft. Both these aircraft served us well. Even the strength of the MiG-27s has been reduced to half the original. While technological obsolescence is an inevitable phenomenon, there is a need for concurrent replenishment of our combat inventory. As you are aware, the Light Combat Aircraft project has overshot production time frames. The MMRCA would take at least 4 years to fully fructify. However, it would be unwise to base our combat efficacy solely on classical numerology – that of having the required numbers. New squadrons of Su-30 MKI are being raised and midlife upgrades of [the] Jaguar, Mirage-2000 and MiG-29 fleets [are] on the anvil to improve our combat effectiveness. The induction of force multipliers like FRAs and AWACS has enhanced our combat effectiveness. So while depleting strength is a concern, it is equally true that we have maintained our combat edge through new inductions and upgrades and the IAF is fully capable today of thwarting any threat.

    AW: The Defense Research and Development Organization chief commented on Technology Day that the armed forces must back homegrown efforts and not look outside India every time. Do you think India has reached a stage to achieve self-reliance in defense? As the head of IAF, what are your suggestions that could bring down time and most overruns associated with some of our indigenous programs?



    P.V.N.: The IAF has been at the forefront of supporting indigenous development and production. Today, a major portion of our combat aircraft inventory is license-produced by HAL (Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd.). The bulk of the ancillary and maintenance equipment is procured from indigenous sources, including most of the role equipment. However, one must remember that IAF’s operational capability cannot be compromised. Barring a few instances, such as our indigenous EW (electronic warfare) capabilities, what has predominantly been indigenized are low-cost, low-technology products. Most state-of-the-art systems and cutting-edge technologies are not yet available in the domestic market, and projects aimed at indigenization have long gestation periods. Hence, in order to ensure that IAF’s operational capability remains at its peak, we need to see what is best for us. In the long run, it is IAF’s firm conviction that India’s military power must be fully sustainable through indigenous efforts. We fully support efforts toward indigenization of our aerospace industry, which will be a major factor in enhancing our composite national power.



    AW: Tejas is finally entering the pre-IOC (initial operating capability) phase, and there seems to be a renewed energy with the ADA (Aeronautical Development Agency)-HAL. Looking ahead, what are the lessons India learned from the Tejas program? What should be done now to ensure that the program does not slip further?



    P.V.N.: LCA is a major landmark in our aerospace industry’s efforts to achieve self-reliance. Many valuable lessons encompassing various aspects of design and development of an aircraft have been learned from this project. The project required the development of state-of-the-art technology in the form of avionics and airframe, as well as engine and weapons integration to the platform. The project has witnessed a lot of interagency coordination – right from its inception, design and development, prototype production and air worthiness certification stage. I am sure these lessons will greatly benefit our future projects like Medium Transport Aircraft (MTA) and Fifth Generation Fighter Aircraft (FGFA). Now that ADA-HAL has the requisite technology wherewithal in this project, I do not foresee any major slippages on the LCA project, and the aircraft will be inducted in initial operational configuration in a few months time.

    AW: HAL has been the backbone of IAF for many decades. Do you think HAL’s plate is full and the company needs strong visionaries to steady the flight path, considering that almost all programs are running way behind schedule?

    P.V.N.: HAL has always been and will continue to be the principal supplier of aircraft and support equipment for the IAF, especially in our quest for indigenization. For the last three years, almost 50%-60% of the capital budget of the IAF has been allocated to HAL for various projects. The sheer volume involved and the niche capability that HAL has acquired will ensure that its plays a lead role. The entry of the private players in the aerospace sector would only enhance our capability all round. I am sure that HAL is looking at strengthening and expanding its development and production capacity. We believe that with the entry of the private sector, the quality of HAL products will also improve.



    AW: Finally, what are the essential qualities an air warrior should have to meet the challenge of the changing times?



    P.V.N.: The core values of an air warrior are sacrosanct. I am confident that my air warriors uphold the highest traditions and customs of the Indian Air Force, and while doing so, they adopt a very professional approach toward their job. Integrity and professional excellence are some of the core values that are essential in an air warrior. Our air warriors will have to continuously adapt, evolve and remain flexible while assimilating state-of-the-art technologies. In order to achieve these objectives, we have introduced a well-structured and streamlined training system aimed to ensure the grooming and all-round development of our youngsters into competent and professional air warriors.
     
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  4. LETHALFORCE

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    Defcom India 2011: Transforming to net centric warfare

    Defcom India 2011: Transforming to net centric warfare

    Wars are no longer fought at predefined battlefield. Battlefield have now become digitised and hence require flawless, uninterrupted and secure communication. This was the message that was conveyed by one and all at the recently held seminarcum- exhibition, Defcom India 2011. Organised by Integrated HQ of MoD (Army), Corps of Signals and CII, the theme of this year’s event was ‘Enabling ICT Infrastructure for Info Age Warfare’.

    India’s Defence Minister AK Antony called upon the armed forces to forge strong partnerships with the industry and the academia to secure the goals of national security. In a message read out in absentia at the inauguration of the two-day event, Antony said this partnership is vital to increase the technology threshold of our defence forces. Similar views were echoed by Dr MM Pallam Raju, Minister of State for Defence, Government of India. “National security is not the prerogative of the armed forces alone, it is essential that the best minds in the country contribute to this worthy cause. Indian industry, academia and research and development organisations can offer definite contribution towards this effort,” he said. Pointing out that information superiority in today’s scenario directly translates into combat superiority, Dr Pallam Raju called for creating a responsive and agile ICT infrastructure. He said that the greatest challenge for armed forces is to transform to meet both current and future challenges.

    Chief of Army Staff Gen VK Singh, Indian Army, said that the academia and the industry can help the armed forces leverage state-ofthe- art technologies in executing dedicated ICT networks. “With the focus of the battlefield shifting to a network-centric environment, it is imperative to augment our capabilities in the digital domain to maintain information superiority over our adversaries. Our information grid will be a potent force multiplier and will enable us to optimally use our weapon systems,” he said. Explaining the importance of information in future, Lt Gen SP Kochhar, Signal Officer-in-Chief and Senior Colonel Commandant, Corps of Signals, Integrated HQ of MoD (Army), said, “Any break in communication would mean loss of life which is not acceptable. Ensuring that a soldier always remains in touch with his command center is a must.”

    Commodore KK Pandey, PDNS (Navy), raised a very interesting point when he said, “Knowledge is not power but dissemination of knowledge in real-time is power.,” adding, “War is now being fought at the speed of thought.” He also said that security and IT department should work closely in this age where speed is the essence of war-fighting.

    Talking about challenges facing the armed forces towards attaining netcentricity, Maj Gen VP Shrivastava, said, “Information security, technology obsolescence, protection of information infrastructure are some of the major challenges that we need to address. Attempts have to be made to reduce the procurement time so that technology doesn’t become obsolete by the time we acquire them.”
     
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  5. LETHALFORCE

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    AFNET to boost IAF's network centric warfare capability - India - DNA


    AFNET to boost IAF's network centric warfare capability



    IAF will take a giant leap in its quest to have an advanced networked warfare capability (NCW) when Air Force Net (AFNET), the system's backbone, will become operational in 10 days from now.

    "We will be dedicating the AFNET, the backbone of IAF's network centric warfare capability, on September 14," a senior IAF official told PTI in New Delhi today.

    AFNET or Air Force Net is a fibre optic-based network on which the Integrated Air Command and Control System (IACCS) of the IAF would ride.

    Once AFNET is enabled, the IAF would rapidly link all its ground, air and space assets to have a complete situational awareness of the area it wants to secure and dominate.

    IACCS will provide connectivity for all the airborne platforms and ground platforms as part of IAF's network centricity and enables real-time transfer of voice, data and images among aircraft, satellites and ground bases.

    "Network centricity involves linking ground, air, and space assets together so as to have complete situational awareness.

    "And what does it provide? A real-time sensor-to-shooter loop, which enables IAF commanders to take instant decisions even as information is shared among platforms and personnel to order the weapons to be deployed," the officer said, explaining the concept.

    "NCW is vital. You cannot survive today for long against a good adversary without the NCW capability," he added.

    Pioneered by the US department of defence, NCW relies on computer processing power and networking communications technology to provide shared information of the battle space among armed forces.

    This shared awareness increases synergy for command and control, resulting in superior decision- making, and the ability to coordinate complex military operations over long distances for an overwhelming war-fighting advantage.

    IAF had got delivery of the Israeli Phalcon airborne early warning and control system (AWACS) -- the air link in its AFNET -- last year.

    The AWACS, a major force multiplier, will provide the IAF an eye in the skies providing advance information as enemy fighter planes takes off, giving enough time for IAF to scramble its own fighter jets to counter them.

    India had in March 2004 signed an $1.1 billion deal with Israel for three AWACS mounted on Russian-made IL-76 heavy lift transport aircraft. Another three AWACS are expected to join the fleet for which orders would be placed soon.

    India is also developing its own AWACS on the Embraer platform and is likely to get three of them as well.
     
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    IAF to kickstart its network-centric warfare backbone - Indian Express

    IAF to kickstart its network-centric warfare backbone


    The IAF is all set to boost its network-centric warfare capability by kickstarting Air Force Network (AFNET), a reliable digital information grid that enables accurate and faster response to enemy threats, on September 14.

    The modern, state-of-the-art AFNET will be a fully secure network, making IAF a true net-centric combat force and the first among the three services to complete interlinking major installations throughout the country on a high bandwidth network, an IAF spokesperson said in a press release here today.

    The AFNET will replace the IAF's old communication network set-up using the tropo-scatter technology of the 1950s.

    "This monumental achievement also marks the successful clearance of one milestone for the release of radio spectrum, a very valuable but finite resource," the spokespeson said.

    Defence Minister A K Antony will launch the AFNET services in the Capital in the presence of Telecom Minister A Raja, he said.

    The IAF project is part of the overall mission to network all three services. The mission comes in the backdrop of an Information Technology Roadmap document of the Defence Ministry stipulating automation, simulated training and mandatory computer proficiency in the services.

    "IAF has taken up a mandate to create and maintain an assured, dedicated, secure and inter-operable communication network along with associated services to provide real time, instantaneous transfer of information between Sensors, Command and Control (C2) centres and Shooters," the release said.

    In addition, IAF aspires to use communication network and IT-enabled infrastructure for all other operational, techno-logistics and administrative functions to leverage development in this field to enhance efficiency, cost-effectiveness and ease of administration, it said.
     
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    Indian Army focuses on network centric warfare

    Indian Army focuses on network centric warfare

    NEW DELHI: India might have become an IT superpower but the benefits of this are yet to percolate to the armed forces, which will increasingly need to focus on technology in the digitalised battlefields of the future.

    "Network centric warfare will be the backbone of combat in the digitised battlefield. In fact, network centric warfare is to warfare what e-business is to business," a senior Indian Army officer said Tuesday.

    Lt. Gen. Davinder Singh,
    Signal-officer-in-Chief at Army Headquarters, was speaking at a seminar here on Infostructure for Network Centric Warfare. It was jointly organised by the Confederation of Indian Industry and Army Headquarters.

    "The road ahead is pretty long. The developed world has gone far ahead," cautioned the army chief, Gen. N.C. Vij, pointing to the US campaigns in Afghanistan and Iraq.

    This posed a tremendous challenge for industry to develop indigenous capacity because "we don't want to be dependent on someone's goodwill", Vij added.

    Network centric warfare is about maintaining information superiority on the battlefield - defeating or deterring the enemy by getting the right information to the right place, in the right format, at the right level of precision and accuracy and at the right time.

    Experts point out that this fusion of information was what made all the difference during the operations in Afghanistan and in the first phase of the Iraq war.

    Network centric warfare, Davinder Singh noted, was "a product of the convergence of computers and communications".

    It could enhance combat power by networking the intelligence gathering apparatus, the decision makers and the battlefield commanders to ensure the optimum deployment of soldiers and equipment, he added.

    "In essence, the power of network centric warfare is derived from an effective network of networks. Mission effectiveness can be dramatically increased by robustly networking a force to improve information sharing and situational awareness.

    "This demands a seamless integration of strategic and tactical networks," Singh said.

    "What we are aiming at is a dramatic improvement in command and control capabilities on the battlefield," he added.
     
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  11. LETHALFORCE

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    Indian army to become fully network enabled as spending on defence continue


    By Samantha Tanner, IQPC

    As defence cuts come to the forefront of capabilities among armed forces across the world, emerging economies are spending more in order to completely modernise equipment available for their troops. India is one such country experiencing a huge rise in defence budgets in order to keep up with their neighbours China and to completely revolutionise their army technologically.

    The Indian army is planning to be completely network enabled in order to grow and develop their forces over the next decade. It is currently estimated that India will spend big with some estimates putting the figure at $120 billion over the next five years, most of which will transform the troops into modern, high tech soldiers with network centric warfare technologies.

    Becoming a more modern and high tech army is a key aspect in India's massive spending strategy. This already includes the Futuristic Infantry Solider as a System (F-INSAS) which is a system that will allow soldiers to have the capability to fight in network centric warfare and electronic warfare environments. Added to this, new mini laptops and GPS systems are currently being sought in order to fully digitise the troops on the ground.

    In addition to this, the IAF last year introduced Air Force Net (AFNET) was billed as the backbone of its network centric warfare capability. The system is a fibre optic-based network on which the Integrated Air Command and Control System (IACCS) is used. When the system was launched it linked all systems within its ground, air and space assets and gave complete situational awareness of the area it wanted to secure and dominate.

    This shared awareness on a faster and more inter-operable system made for more synergy between command and control and the ability to make complex decisions away from the front line and gives the troops greater warfighting advantage.

    Speaking at Defence IQ's Future Artillery event in March, Major General Vikas Joshi, Additional Director of General Artillery in the Indian Army explained that India's defence strategy was to make their soldiers fast, light and accurate. He explained that India was going to become an army focused on network centric warfare solutions in order to effectively fight in various terrain across the country.

    He also added that information superiority, surveillance and target acquisition were all key aspects in making the Indian Army modern and high tech for their network centric capabilities. In essence moving away from platform centric to network centric and create complete battlefield transparency.

    While there are those who believe that India is gearing up towards potential future conflicts with their South Asian neighbours, the complete modernisation of their army and the high tech systems they will be using within the next decade shows how important Network Centric Warfare capabilities have become in winning conflicts on information alone.

    It's not just India that are spending on these modernisation trends. Figures from Frost & Sullivan, the market research analysts, shows that defence communication technologies such as tactical radios and military satellite and network-centric communications are the key technologies driving funding in the defence market. Additionally, the next generation of technological development for military communications will be greatly influenced by the goal of a fully interoperable solution.

    Future Artillery India will take place in New Delhi in June and will focus on India's current artillery capabilities. Speakers include the Indian Army, India's MoD, US Army, French Army and the Israeli Army.
     
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  12. LETHALFORCE

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    IAF's defence network set for December boost with IACCS - Economic Times

    IAF's defence network set for December boost with IACCS


    NEW DELHI: By the end of this year, India will take a significant step towards plugging some gaping holes in its existing air surveillance and defence network.

    That is when the first five nodes of IACCS (integrated air command and control system) will become operational in the western and southwestern sectors.

    IAF is now also moving the case for government approval for the next five integrated air command and control system nodes, which will be even bigger and complex to cover the rest of the country and island territories, say officials.

    Though the integrated air command and control system project was mooted by IAF in 1998, it's only now that the critical requirement to have a fully-automated network to integrate the wide array of military radars with each other as well as with civilian radars has gained momentum.

    "The aim is to detect and tackle enemy and terror aerial threats in real-time by putting in place a composite and enhanced surveillance capability," said an official.

    With the country's air defence coverage being far from impregnable, especially over central and peninsular India, which can be exploited by aircraft with hostile intent, several plans are currently in motion.

    After acquiring three Israeli Phalcon AWACS (airborne warning and control system) aircraft for $1.1 billion, for instance, IAF's ongoing radar acquisitions include 19 LLTRs (low-level transportable radars), four MPRs (medium-power radars), six mountain radars and 30 indigenous medium-range Rohini radars, among others.

    The automated IACCS will enable quick transfer of data from ground-based radars as well as AWACS and aerostat radars to one central place. With multi-sensor tracking and data fusion ensuring "a filtered and composite air situation picture" at the central hub, the timely detection and neutralization of threats will be possible.

    Progress, of course, has also been made towards integrating the five Airports Authority of India radars at Delhi, Mumbai, Ahmedabad, Chennai and Kolkata into IAF's air defence network.

    "IACCS permits conduct of operations from one central place, facilitating as it does realtime transportation of images, data and voice from satellites, aircraft and ground stations,"' said another officer.

    "We are moving towards a seamless 'sensor-toshooter loop' by the integration of all groundbased and airborne sensors with command and control centres, which in turn can direct air defence and other weapons," he added.

    The digital information grid AFNET (air force network) to replace the old communication network set-up using the tropo-scatter technology of the 1950s, incidentally, became operational last year. IACCS will ride the AFNET backbone.
     
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  13. LETHALFORCE

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    AFNET to Herald Network Centric Operations in Indian Air Force | India Defence

    AFNET to Herald Network Centric Operations in Indian Air Force

    Next week, the Indian Air Force (IAF) would usher in a modern, state-of-the-art digital information grid by dedicating Air Force Network (AFNET), a fully secure and reliable network to the nation making it a true net-centric combat force. The AFNET replaces the IAF’s old communication network set-up using the tropo-scatter technology of the 1950s.

    This monumental achievement also marks the successful clearance of one milestone for release of radio spectrum, a very valuable but finite resource. Defence Minister, Shri AK Antony will launch the AFNET services of the IAF at a special function to be held at New Delhi, on Tuesday. Union Telecom Minister, Shri A Raja will also be present at the function.

    The IAF project is part of the overall mission to network all three services. The mission comes in the backdrop of an IT Roadmap document of the Defence Ministry stipulating automation, simulated training and mandatory computer proficiency in the services.

    IAF has taken up a mandate to create and maintain an assured, dedicated, secure and inter-operable communication network along with associated services to provide real time, instantaneous transfer of information between Sensors, Command and Control (C2) centres and Shooters. In addition, IAF aspires to use communication network and IT-enabled infrastructure for all other operational, techno-logistics and administrative functions to leverage development in this field to enhance efficiency, cost-effectiveness and ease of administration.

    While all three services are engaged in large scale automation and computer-based networking, the IAF is the first among the three to complete the project of interlinking major installations throughout the country on a high bandwidth network.

    All major formations and static establishments have been linked through a secure Wide Area Network (WAN) and are accessible through data communication lines. The nationwide programme was launched by the IAF in collaboration with the private industry to accelerate the use of Information Technology (IT) as well as to link all field units using a dedicated satellite.

    AFNET incorporates the latest traffic transportation technology in form of IP (Internet Protocol) packets over the network using Multi Protocol Label Switching (MPLS). A large VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) layer with stringent quality of service enforcement will facilitate robust, high quality voice, video and conferencing solutions.

    Integrated Air Command and Control System (IACCS), an automated command and control system for Air Defence (AD) operations will ride the AFNET backbone integrating all ground-based and airborne sensors, AD weapon systems and C2 nodes. Subsequent integration with other services networks and civil radars will provide an integrated Air Situation Picture to operators to carry out AD role.

    AFNET will prove to be an effective force multiplier for intelligence analysis, mission planning and control, post-mission feedback and related activities like maintenance, logistics and administration. A comprehensive design with multi-layer security precautions for “Defence in Depth” have been planned by incorporating encryption technologies, Intrusion Prevention Systems to ensure the resistance of the IT system against information manipulation and eavesdropping.
     
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    India made electronic warfare systems for IAF Mig-29s and LCA : Defense news

    India made electronic warfare systems for IAF Mig-29s and LCA

    Indian Air Force(IAF)’s Mig-29 and the home-made ’Tejus’ Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) will have electronic warfare(EW) systems developed by India’s DRDO from next year onwards. The older Mig-27 fighters are being equipped this year and operational trials are scheduled next year.

    The tests would be held at two brand new EW ranges that the DRDO is building in the southern Indian states of Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh, said Prahlada, Chief Controller, R & D of DRDO. He was speaking at an EW conference in Bangalore. The two would be part of the 4,000-acre aeronautical test range in Chitradurga, some 200 km from Bangalore, and the 8,000-acre one in Tandur, some 135 km from Hyderabad.

    Once the two new testing ranges are operational in 2012-13, experimental and R & D tests can be conducted, said Prahlada. At present, EW systems are tested in the IAF range in Gwalior in a limited way.

    In 2012, Prahlada said India would fly a fourth-generational EW system, which is being developed by Defence Avionics Research Establishment and Defence Electronics Research Laboratory.
     
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    Press Information Bureau English Releases


    Brahmos Launch, Sam Interceptions and Network Centric Warfare on Display During Tropex 12

    “26/11 Mumbai Incident Changed Security Matrix” : Antony

    The Defence Minister Shri AK Antony spent two days with the Indian Navy on Feb 07-08,2012. The Defence Minister was given a glimpse of the expansive scope and scale of the Indian Navy’s annual Theatre Level Readiness and Operational Exercise (TROPEX) over the two day visit with the Chief of Naval Staff Admiral NirmalVerma and the Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Eastern Naval Command Vice Admiral AK Chopra in company.

    In the backdrop, were two completely networked fleets, widely dispersed across seas in the Indian Ocean, operating in a dense electronic environment to match their professional and technical proficiency. New platforms, weapons sensors, communication systems and tactics were being tested and tried to optimize the net combat power of the fleets. Over forty surface combatants of various classes, submarines and a large number of aircraft including UAVs are participating in the exercise. As would be the case in any operation of the twenty first century, the exercise had a jointmanship element as IAF aircraft such as AWACS, Sukhois, Mirages and Jaguars also participated.

    ‘No Limits’, the motto of INS Shivalik where the Defence Minister first landed, best described the scale of the Indian Naval operational exercise. The Defence Minister witnessed INS Shivalik execute, various evolutions including a 'surface gun shoot' and Jackstay with INS Shakti in copy book fashion. Incidentally, it maybe recalled that the Defence Minister had commissioned INS Shivalik on Apr 29, 2010 and Admiral Verma had commissioned INS Shakti on October 01, 2011. The integration of INS Shivalik and INS Shakti as fully operational components of the Eastern Fleet in such a short span of time reflected the efficiency and professionalism of Indian Navy’s training and operational methodology.

    Whereas the quick integration of new ships was a reflection of the Indian Navy’s high standards of professionalism in operations and training, the sustenance of potency and combat efficiency of a couple of surface combatants over a few decades old, reflected the Indian Navy’s sound maintenance practices and technical prowess.

    The transformation of the Indian Navy to a future ready network enabled force was epitomised in INS Shivalik but the Defence Minister also saw a reflection of the same on his visit to INS Viraat. INS Viraat, the Flag ship of the Western Fleet, demonstrated the power of a networked force as operational plots and pictures from remote sensors were transferred and collated in a flash to present a comprehensive picture of the Battlespace and effect optimal use of the weapons on board the various potent ships. The recently upgraded Sea Harriers proved their lethality with ranges extended by Air to Air refueling and BVR missiles. Su 30MKI aircraft, Mirages and Jaguars, being directed by an IAF AWACS, operating over sea for the first time tested the Air Defence capability of the INS Viraat even as the ships were operating in a Multi- threat scenario. During this battle the Defence Minister witnessed, first hand, the potency of the upgraded Sea Harriers particularly in the networked environment.

    A critical part of Anti Missile Defence being Surface to Air Missiles (SAM), the Defence Minister witnessed the successful interception of a fast, low flying, Surface to Surface missile by a SAM. A clear night with a full moon laid an idyllic setting for this demonstration of power and professionalism.

    The Defence Minister witnessed a successful and impressive launch of the Brahmos, supersonic long range anti shipping missile, from a recently up-graded Ranvir class destroyer. This was particularly satisfying as the launch of the missile was an affirmation of our indigenous weapon capabilities.

    The Defence Minister also witnessed a full scale air power demonstration from INS Viraat with Seakings, Sea Harriers and Chetaks participating. Whilst on board INS Viraat, Shri Antony was also shown the reputed professionalism of the MARCOS as they carried out a precision landing on the flight deck in the middle of the sea using Combat Free Fall technique.

    Addressing the 'Viraatees' he said he was “very very happy to be on India's most prestigious INS Viraat” the Minister added that by early next year the Indian Navy is likely to operate one more aircraft carrier Vikramaditya and the Indigenous Aircraft Carrier some years later. Stating that 26/11 changed the security matrix he said that the entire nation now acknowledges the critical requirement of maritime security and the important role of the Indian Navy. Complementing the men on their professionalism, the Minister added “...wherever we go (abroad), Indian Navy is the most sought after service...numerous countries want more cooperation with the Indian Navy. Acknowledging the difficult working conditions afloat, the Defence Minister said “I know how more ships alone is not important, your welfare is also very important. I assure you one by one we are improving your service conditions and living conditions”. The Minister assured the men that he would do “whatever is humanly possible” to improve the conditions of service. On completion of his two day visit, very happy with what he saw, Shri Antony said “The Indian Navy is increasing its capability to meet their ever increasing challenges and responsibility successfully. The country is proud of the capabilities and dedication of the Indian Navy”. He expressed his confidence in the IN by saying “We can be confident that maritime security including coastal security of our country is in the safe hands of the Indian Navy”.

    TROPEX 2012 will continue over the next few days and the successful missile launches and interceptions, uninterrupted seamless operations in a networked condition with BVR interceptions herald the emergence of a capable and potent 'future ready' Indian Navy.

    Shri Antony has since returned to New Delhi.
     
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  16. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

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    Network Centric Warfare is a “key enabler”: Seminar

    [​IMG]

    There is a groundswell of support among the higher echelons of power for speedy deployment of network centric warfare (NCW) systems, borne out of a robust homegrown network. At a seminar on “NCW in the Indian Context”, organised jointly by SP Guide Publications and the Centre for Land Warfare Studies (CLAWS), eminent speakers, including Dr V.K. Saraswat, Scientific Adviser to the Defence Minister; Lt General N.B. Singh, Director General Information Systems; Lt General P. Mohapatra, Signal Officer-in-Chief and others were unanimous on how NCW would be a “key enabler” in the emerging battlefield scenario.

    The Scientific Adviser who inaugurated the well-attended seminar, set the tone by stating that NCW is evolutionary and that it should be treated as ‘an enabler and not as the main tool’. A force with NCW capability will easily transform itself to a seamless, network-enabled information age force. Information advantage provides a decisive warfighting advantage, with its shared battle-awareness, speed of command and rapid knockout capability. NCW is based on a network and the nation is on course to deploy the next generation network (NGN).

    Mentioning how different technologies such as satellite communication; mobile ad hoc network; active array digital radars etc had been deployed, Dr Saraswat underlined the importance of security architecture in all the technologies.

    Dr Saraswat released the latest issue of SP’s MAI, a fortnightly which addresses security concerns.

    Brigadier (Retd) Gurmeet Kanwal, Director, CLAWS, welcomed the gathering.

    The Chairman and Managing Director of SP Guide Publications, Jayant Baranwal, in his vote of thanks, underscored the importance of NCW in the emerging threat scenarios in India.



    Security Concerns

    In the session on NCW and the Indian Armed Forces: Present Status and Concerns, Lt General N.B. Singh stated that the Indian Army had embarked upon NCW and was factoring risk-mitigation strategies. Mentioning how import of electronic equipment, particularly from “our adversaries” increased security risks, he said one of the adversaries (referring to the Chinese) had over 4,00,000 hackers and “we have to be prepared for this”.

    Major General (Retd) D.V. Kalra, former ADG IS said NCW increased intelligence and surveillance capabilities; enhanced weapon deployment (increased lethality) and seamlessness. With NCW the means of surveillance and the means of engagement had become decisive.

    Colonel K.P.M. Das of Cisco said the procurement conundrum would continue in India and one had to be prepared to the delayed introduction of tactical communications system (TCS). As for NCW, he drew an analogy with football where it is not just a technology-game but a mind-game as well. He mentioned that over 90 per cent of C4ISR platforms were on Cisco.

    Brigadier L.B. Chand, Deputy Assistant Chief of Integrated Defence Staff (DAC IDS) dwelled on tri-services effects-based operations (EBO) and how it incorporated the behavioural element (political, economic and cultural), but for this it was as good as netcentric operations. Giving the example of EBO, first deployed on January 17, 1991 in Iraq, he said the operations worked simultaneously, paralysing different elements of the opponents.

    In the session on ‘Future Prospects and Challenges for NCW’, Lt General (Retd) V.K. Kapoor and Editor of SP Guide Publications, who chaired the session, said with nuclear deterrence in the region, the likelihood of a large-scale war is limited, but there would be other disturbances/skirmishes. These forces need to get ready and NCW would substantially assist in their operations. “Think big with smaller forces,” he quipped.

    Air Vice Marshal (Retd) D.N. Ganesh said network centric operations would entail global awareness; global tools and communication and global decision-making (as it will be transparent). However, he cautioned that there were perils of emulating the US example.

    warfare had assumed dangerous dimensions. Even networks such as that of the army are not threat-proof and with the opening up of networks, the threat potential was increasing.

    Wing Commander (Retd) Arif Khan of Ericsson talked about leveraging COTS (commercial off the shelf) technologies from the civilian domain to the military domain through customisation.



    Valedictory Session

    Lt General P. Mohapatra, Signal Officer-in-Chief, said net centricity is not a goal in itself and that it is ever evolving. “It is about networking,” he said and cautioned that there was possibility of information overload which would reduce the speed of decision-making. This had to be guarded against. On interoperability between the tri-services, he said if a network is in place, it would be a great driver for jointness. “Once the defence communication network is there, it would bring about triservices integration.”


    Source:Network Centric Warfare is a “key enabler”: Seminar - SP's Military, Aerospace and Internal Security
     
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  17. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

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    NCW in the Indian context 2011 - Seminar



    Very Interesting..

    Do watch..
     
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  18. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

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    Part-2

     
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  19. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

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    Part-3

     
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  20. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

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    Part-4

     
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  21. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

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