Indian Politics: The Dangerous Game of Appeasement

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by A chauhan, Sep 24, 2013.

  1. A chauhan

    A chauhan "अहिंसा परमो धर्मः धर्म हिंसा तथैव च: l" Senior Member

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    An old article...
    Indian Politics: The Dangerous Game of Appeasement

    21 February 2012, Mayank Singh
    The Congress party in India has appeased Muslims by granting them policy favors. This strategy has produced unforeseen side effects and is leading to further fragmentation along religious lines.
    Indian Politics: The Dangerous Game of Appeasement | Fair Observer°
     
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  3. parijataka

    parijataka Senior Member Senior Member

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    Congress is probably losing many Hindu votes due to their lopsided policies.
     
  4. DivineHeretic

    DivineHeretic Senior Member Senior Member

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    Appasement and support of the minority communities is definitely welcome, but it mut be recognised and realised that the majority has the biggest say in keeping peace and tolerence in any society, any region, any state, any country. No place can ever keep peace unless the majority accepts it.

    And the majority, or for the matter any group, will only take so much before snapping. They will only tolerate so much before the fires of hate, anger, revenge once dormant, burn bright enough, burn hot enough to melt the restraints on the society.

    The fibres restraining majority always appear strong, indestructible so long as they are unburdened by stress. The straitjacket wrapped around the majority in the forms of laws, order, always appears perfect, sufficient to paralyse the mass, until everything snaps.

    And then the politicians, the Police and the bureaucreats are left wondering what went wrong, how the majority- the quiet, tolerant community, the community that could easily be subdued, fooled, turned into flood of monsters infected with bloodlust
     
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  5. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    On TV Debates, I find that more and more people are no longer toeing the Politically Correct line!

    The best TV anchor who allows all shades of view equal time is Aktar Khan of NewsX.

    And he is very calm and very fair to all!
     
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  6. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Has the minority affairs ministry outlived its utility?
    With the ministry dependent on states and NGOs to implement its various schemes, demands for winding it up have surfaced


    Should the ministry of minority affairs be wound up? It depends on who you ask. If you put the question to bureaucrats in the ministry and members of the ruling party, the answer is an obvious no. And, if you ask the opposition parties and some intellectuals, the answer is a definite yes. Last week, Planning Commission Member Abhijit Sen kicked up a storm when he lashed out at the ministry for not doing enough for Muslims who comprise 13.4 per cent of the country's population, according to the 2001 census. His remarks assume significance in the backdrop of the recent communal riots in Muzaffarnagar of Uttar Pradesh.

    The Muslim vote will be important in the coming assembly elections in Delhi, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and Jharkhand. The general elections too are round the corner. For instance, 35 Lok Sabha seats have more than 30 per cent Muslim population. On 38 seats, Muslim population ranges between 21 per cent and 30 per cent, and on 145 seats, their population is 11-20 per cent, says a news report. Sen's outburst came at the launch of Social Development Report 2012: Minorities at the Margins. The report, authored by Zoya Hasan and Mushirul Hasan, has picked gaping holes in the government's initiatives to reach out to Muslims. The authors have bluntly attacked the ministry of minority affairs for its ineffectiveness.

    "The Muslim issue is serious in the country and politicians are reluctant to push for it. This is now left mainly to the ministry of minority affairs, which might not be the best way," says Sen. "If you want to provide health and infrastructure to Muslims, this ministry can provide a certain amount of money but it can't implement it. This has rendered the ministry ineffective in its approach, as it has to largely depend on other ministries and even more on the states."

    The ministry came into existence in January 2006, after the Congress-led United Progressive Alliance split the ministry of social justice and empowerment to exclusively look after the wellbeing of five minorities: Muslims (13.4 per cent of the population), Christains (2.3 per cent), Sikhs (1.9 per cent), Buddhists (0.8 per cent) and Parsis (less than a lakh). In the 11th Five-year Plan (2007-2012), the government allocated Rs 7,000 crore to the ministry, of which it claims to have spent Rs 6,824 crore. The budget for the 12th Five-year Plan (2012-2017) has been more than doubled to Rs 17,323 crore. However, the report by Zoya Hasan and Mushirul Hasan says that during 2007-2012, the states failed to utilise half of the allocated funds. Some states spent only 20 per cent. The ministry of minority affairs passes on the money allocated for various schemes to the states, which are then responsible for spending it. In this case, while the ministry may have passed on almost the entire money, the implementation by the states has been tardy. That explains the discrepancy in numbers. "Their report is based on data till 2010," says a high-ranking ministry official dismissing its findings. Efforts to reach Zoya Hasan and Mushirul Hasan over the phone remained futile.

    In its infancy, the ministry continued to work on the lines of its parent ministry. It almost remained dormant until the Justice Rajinder Sachar Committee on economic, social and education of Muslims was tabled in Parliament in November 2006. The Committee was appointed in 2005. Its key recommendations were: set up an Equal Opportunity Commission to look into grievances of deprived groups like minorities, create a nomination procedure to increase participation of minorities in public bodies, increase employment share of Muslims, recognise degrees from madarsas for eligibility in defence, civil and banking examinations, and provide financial and other support to initiatives built around occupations where Muslims are concentrated and that have growth potential. The government accepted most of its recommendations. With the Sachar Committee report, the ministry brought about some changes to its thinking and started redrafting polices, which are now being denounced as ineffective by activists and intellectuals.

    Has the minority affairs ministry outlived its utility? | Business Standard

    ********************************************************

    Any one has any idea as to what is being done by the Ministry or the NGOs for the other minorities?

    I am aware of many Anglo Indians, Christians languishing in poverty and illiteracy!
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2013
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  7. Dinesh_Kumar

    Dinesh_Kumar Regular Member

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    Giving away free grain to the poor might not be a good idea. In the US, food is prepared and served at various community centers. No one dies for lack of food. However, people soon tire of this food and try to overcome their situation , which is also important. Moreover, the kind of invisible distribution practiced now will lead to hoarding and diversion of grain for commercial gains.
     
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  8. A chauhan

    A chauhan "अहिंसा परमो धर्मः धर्म हिंसा तथैव च: l" Senior Member

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    @Ray sir, I guess no particular religious community including the Hindus can be called culturally, economically strong and developed. And yeah no other minority except Muslims form a vote bank, hence nothing has been done for the Anglo-Indians, Christians, Jains, Buddhists or Sikhs; on the other hand Hindu votes are not religiously polarized, so it is useless for the Congress to attract Hindu votes? This is exactly why we call it vote-bank politics.
     
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  9. A chauhan

    A chauhan "अहिंसा परमो धर्मः धर्म हिंसा तथैव च: l" Senior Member

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    Another old article...

    Congress’s dangerous communal game: Will it cause a Hindu backlash?

    by G V L Narasimha Rao, LensOnNews

    http://www.lensonnews.com/lensonart...nal-game:-will-it-cause-a-hindu-backlash.html
    Using the thread as a vote bank politics by Congress thread :)
     

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