Indian Naval Aviation

Discussion in 'Indian Navy' started by youngindian, Aug 6, 2009.

  1. Krusty

    Krusty Senior Member Senior Member

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    experts please clarify...

    These conditions that US places on Pakistan, turkey wrt the use of F16s, is it the same for EU countries like Netherlands or Switzerland?

    More importantly, is Israel also tied up with these restrictions?

    It doesn't seem to me like they are. Can India get such a deal too? With no strings attached ?
     
  2. TPFscopes

    TPFscopes Rest in Peace Senior Member

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    Strategic Partnership Model is not bound to have these conditions.
    Whatever we signed under MII & SPM will be free from such restrictions.
     
  3. Prashant12

    Prashant12 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Indian Navy Dhruv ASW

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  4. TPFscopes

    TPFscopes Rest in Peace Senior Member

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    Boeing positions Block III Super Hornet to meet Indian requirements
    Boeing has offered to build its twin-engine Super Hornet fighter aircraft in India if selected to meet Indian armed forces requirements.
    In comments to Jane’s on 6 September, Dan Gillian, vice-president of Boeing Defense, Space & Security’s F/A-18 and E/A-18 programmes, confirmed that the US corporation is positioning the F/A-18E/F Block III Super Hornet to meet requirements in the Indian Navy (IN) and Indian Air Force (IAF).
    The IN requirement for Multi-Role Carrier Borne Fighters (MRCBFs) is supported by a global request for information (RFI) issued in January 2017.
    Incidentally the US Navy has also been offered the new Block III Superhornet which had earlier okayed the upgrades over the existing Block II. Tbe upgrades mainly focused on better network integratation through TTNT( Tactical Targeting Network Technology) and stealth.
    The upgrades Included in Block 3 the Raytheon AN/APG-79 active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar, an Enclosed Weapon Pod (EWP) for stealth, an Elbit Systems large area display (LAD) ‘glass’ cockpit and next-generation avionics; an infrared search and track (IRST); ‘shoulder-mounted’ conformal fuel tanks (CFTs); Integrated Defensive Electronic Counter Measures (IDECM); and new General Electric F-414-400 enhanced engines.
    Pictures -
    1. Block III upgrades;
    [​IMG]

    2. Block II IRST(incl in blk-III);
    [​IMG]

    3. Elbit large cockpit display;
    [​IMG]

    4. RCS reduction features;
    [​IMG]

    5. New GPS Tx/Rx antenna with TTNT
    [​IMG]
     
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  5. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

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    The serial numbers are different, It seems Navy is indeed looking into ASW version of Dhruvs after-all ..

    Will wait for more such pictures ..

     
  6. Chinmoy

    Chinmoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Sorry if a repost. But to the point analysis of every current Helicopter deal doing round.



    The most logical defence talk show on Indian television I'd say.
     
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  7. sthf

    sthf Senior Member Senior Member

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    I watched this episode when it aired. There was a talk about SBTH or so I recall which puzzled me. Does anyone have any information about it?
     
  8. Butter Chicken

    Butter Chicken Senior Member Senior Member

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    Boeing and HAL discuss building F/A-18 fighter

    The Boeing Company (hereafter Boeing), which is a vying strongly to supply the Indian Navy with 57 “multi-role carrier borne fighters” (MRCBF), has entered talks with Hindustan Aeronautics (HAL) to explore the co-manufacture of its F/A-18E/F Super Hornet fighter in India, say credible sources in the defence ministry. Along with HAL, Boeing also intends to involve the Mahindra Group in building Super Hornets in India.

    Boeing and HAL have already held exploratory discussions in Bengaluru in September and are scheduled to meet on Friday in Bengaluru for another round of talks. They will also finalise a “non-disclosure agreement” that binds all sides to keep their negotiations confidential.

    Contacted for comments, a Boeing spokesperson responded: “HAL has been a key partner of Boeing for over two decades and today manufactures components for our commercial and defense platforms, including for the F/A-18 Super Hornet. We are continually exploring ways to expand that relationship. Needless to say, we cannot comment on specific discussions with our partners.”

    The defence ministry and Mahindras did not respond to requests for comments. Boeing seeks to leverage HAL’s long experience in licence-producing aircraft in India, most recently the Hawk trainer, and Jaguar and Sukhoi-30MKI fighters; and to present the defence ministry with a clear plan for co-producing the Super Hornet in India with a high indigenous content.

    Furthermore, Boeing’s partnership with HAL — which already has an airfield and manufacturing hangars in Bengaluru — would significantly reduce the price of each Super Hornet. In contrast, a vendor that partners a private Indian firm would need to factor aerospace infrastructure into its pricing. Boeing has already expressed public reservations about the private sector’s inexperience in aerospace. As Business Standard reported (September 8, Boeing flags inexperience of private sector ‘strategic partners’) Boeing India chief, Pratyush Kumar, stated in New Delhi that the Indian private sector is not yet capable of manufacturing complex military aircraft under transfer of technology (ToT).

    Urging India to co-opt public and private enterprise, Kumar said he “could not find a single example [of successfully building an aircraft under ToT] where it was just the brand new private enterprise with limited aerospace experience. Look at Turkey, look at Japan, look at Brazil, look at multiple countries. In all cases there is a fine balancing act of co-opting the capabilities of both public and private enterprise.” Now Boeing is doing exactly that, by seeking to co-opt HAL and the Mahindra Group into co-producing Super Hornets.
     
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