Indian Education System: News & Views

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by Daredevil, Jun 18, 2009.

  1. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2009
    Messages:
    11,613
    Likes Received:
    5,669
    All education related things here.

    *******************
    Top Indian Professional Universities/Institutes/Colleges - 2009

    Outlook-GfK-Mode Survey

    Top 3 Engineering Colleges

    IIT, Kharagpur
    IIT, Bombay
    IIT, Kanpur

    Top 3 Medical Colleges
    AIIMS, Delhi
    CMC, Vellore
    AFMC, Pune

    Top 3 Dental Colleges
    CDS, Manipal
    Maulana Azad, Delhi
    Govt Dental College, Mumbai

    Top 3 Law Colleges
    NLSIU, Bangalore
    NUJS, Calcutta
    NALSR, Hyderabad

    Top 3 Colleges For Social Work
    TISS, Mumbai
    DSSW, Delhi Univ
    CSW, Mumbai Univ

    Top 3 Architecture
    IIT, Kharagpur
    Sir JJ College, Mumbai
    SPA, Delhi

    Top 3 Mass Communication
    IIMC, Delhi
    Xavier Inst, Mumbai
    AJ Kidwai, Delhi

    Top 3 Hotel Management Colleges
    IHM, Mumbai
    Oberoi Centre, Delhi
    IHM, Delhi
    ***

    Government biggies like the IITs in Kharagpur, Kanpur and Roorkee topped in placement with 100% success rates.
    41% of the Top 75 engineering colleges are privately owned. Colleges like BITS Pilani top private ranks.
    Only two private colleges topped in their categories: TISS, Mumbai, and Manipal Dental College.
    10 of the Top 15 dental colleges are from south India. Eight of them are private institutions.
    ***

    It's been a terrible year, professionally speaking, and one that has dulled the sheen of the India Story. Even if the economic slowdown currently looks like a figment of the Sensex's imagination, there's no denying the harsh realities: the jobs market has swung from irrational exuberance to an irrational freeze. While the pendulum will swing back, it'll be a while before we see 40 per cent annual pay hikes again. More worryingly, manufacturing and exports remain in the dumps. While much of the attention has been on the middle class' bewilderment at this dramatic turn of events, it is the armies of skilled and semi-skilled workers who have been hit the most. They continue to have reason to worry.

    In these stormy times, Outlook's annual ranking of India's top professional colleges�in its fourth edition, this time with GfK-Mode�is an island of reassuring calm. That's because there are many familiar top-ranked institutions in the perceptual listings�an indication, if any was needed, of mind over glitzy matter. Given the advertising barrage by institutes of all types claiming "cent per cent placements" and promising a "good college life", this is a crucial need. Interestingly, industry professionals who participated in the survey gave more importance to academic excellence and the selection process�and lower weightage to an institute's infrastructure and placement track record. There is a lesson here somewhere for prospective students.

    Then, we have a brand new minister for HRD, with plans to radically transform higher education. Actually there's no better time than now to fix the mess. Outlook interviewed Kapil Sibal to get a sense of his gameplan for higher education. We have also sought views on two issues that will dominate headlines in the months to come: the future of many deemed universities and the move to allow foreign universities into India. A scarier, and more immediate, concern is the horrible reality of capitation fees and ragging. Our report on the measures to tackle ragging highlights the lack of any action on the ground. It also paints a disturbing picture about our society's value systems.

    Last year, we had said that it was a wonderful time to be a young student in India. Happily, that fundamental reality remains�students have more choices than ever before, which is mirrored in the new streams we have added to this year's ranking.As always, choose wisely.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 14, 2010
  2.  
  3. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2009
    Messages:
    11,613
    Likes Received:
    5,669
    'We Must Strengthen Our University System, Allow Foreign Institutions In'

    'We Must Strengthen Our University System, Allow Foreign Institutions In'

    An unusually taciturn HRD minister on the proposed 'super regulator' for universities and his plans to open the doors to foreign universities

    LOLA NAYAR ON KAPIL SIBAL
    In his first interview since taking charge of the human resources ministry, Kapil Sibal admits he's "feeling the weight". Lola Nayar asks an unusually taciturn Sibal about the proposed 'super regulator' for universities and his plans to open the doors to foreign universities. Excerpts:

    The president, in her address, has said that a Higher Education Commission or a 'super regulator' will be set up. What's your timeline?

    We need to work on this fast because, as indicated in the presidential address, it is part of the 100 days' agenda. So we must initiate steps to get that going. It will mean a separate or different structure will have to be put in place to ensure expansion, inclusiveness and excellence, which translate into access, equity and quality.

    As suggested by the National Knowledge Commission and the Yashpal committee, will there be three separate wings—academic, grants and accreditation—under the 'super regulator'?

    No government is a slave to any commission's recommendations, but these recommendations are pivotal as we move forward to restructure our education system.

    Since taking charge, you have ordered a relook at deemed universities that have been accorded approval. In fact, in the last five years, approval has been granted for a large number of deemed universities. They have also been allowed to remove the "deemed to be" tag....

    I personally think if Section 3 of the UGC Act talks of "deemed to be" universities, then all institutions established under that Section are "deemed to be" universities and should be so named. I have already frozen the granting of "deemed to be" university status to applicants as of today and sought a review of permissions granted, of which I have asked my ministry to submit a report after carrying out an inspection and an inquiry. The UGC will be conducting its own independent inquiry. I have sought the report in three months. Further steps can only be contemplated once the report is ready.

    There appears to be no consensus over the Foreign Education Providers' Bill, permitting entry of foreign universities into the country.

    You must remember that there can never be immediate consensus on issues of this nature. But consensus has to be built. We will try to build that consensus to the extent possible. I think this is something that is required—instead of our students spending $20 billion to go abroad to study, India should be the global hub of education. To do that, we must strengthen our own university system, give it more autonomy, open up to private investment within the country, and maintain standards of excellence. We must also maintain access, equity and quality and must allow foreign institutions to come in. This is perhaps a sector with the largest potential for growth, both internally and through investment from abroad.

    Will foreign universities come within the purview of the proposed 'super regulator'?

    We have drafted a legislation, which was approved by the Group of Ministers but never went forward. I hope and intend to take that forward, get Cabinet approval, and then bring it to Parliament.

    What has been the progress so far on the Sachar Committee recommendations on minority education, such as more institutions in Muslim-dominated areas?

    I have already taken a review. We shall not only implement the Sachar Committee recommendations, but shall do more than that.

    Can you elaborate?

    We shall inform you as and when the road map is in the public domain...hopefully, within the 100 days' agenda.

    What about the Right to Free and Compulsory Education Bill, which has been pending?

    This is our immediate agenda and commitment to the nation.I do hope this is taken forward very soon. It has come to the Rajya Sabha after recommendations from the standing committee.

    The UGC has recently come up with a national eligibility test requirement for selection to the university faculty. This has put a question mark on the future of many temporary and ad hoc teachers.

    As I said, if you want quality in education, then you must ensure that all those who are in the teaching profession have acquired a certain minimum quality certification. I think tests of this nature allow students who go to the universities to at least have the satisfaction that those who teach them are of a certain quality. So such tests are a step in the right direction in the maintenance of quality.

    Would you be looking at attracting more faculty members from overseas to bridge the current gaps?

    We would be looking at improving the quality of the faculty and all possible sources, even outsourcing of quality faculty, shall be welcome. One of the major areas of concern has been the quality of education at the primary and secondary level. It requires substantial reforms. It is perhaps the area of greatest importance if we want India to be a knowledge society. (How it will be achieved) will be spelt out in the days to come.

    What is the greatest challenge you see ahead of you?

    The greatest challenge is to reform the education sector in a way that we are able to build a knowledge society in India to cater to the needs of the future generation in the area of skill development—to be either self-employed or to be adequately employable. Skill development is one way of beating recession. This (skill development and vocational courses becoming an integral part of curricula) requires a full discussion at all levels both for school curricula and at the university level. It is not something that the minister alone can decide.

    Is consensus being built within the Congress on the way forward for the education sector?

    The presidential address is a fair indication of the consensus already existing within the Congress on the education sector. As you know, education is on the concurrent list and most of the national schemes are implemented through the states. We would like to discuss a lot of new ideas with the states, as we would like to bring everybody on board as we move forward. The proposal to have an annual review will help us to study the impact of our schemes and improve the quality of education.
     
  4. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    12,076
    Likes Received:
    327
    Governemnt Planning for Single Board at all India level for School Education

    Govt for single board at all-India level for school education - India - The Times of India

    Govt for single board at all-India level for school education

    25 Jun 2009, 1713 hrs IST, PTI

    NEW DELHI: As part of efforts to reduce "trauma" of students and parents and make the admission process smooth, government favours a single school board at the all-India level and make 10th board examination optional.

    Unveiling his 100-day plan, HRD minister Kapil Sibal said the single board would replace various boards in the country and would hold a uniform examination for all students on the pattern of combined law admission test being organised for admission to law institutions.

    "By a single board, a student can decide which university he wants to go. It is happening in the law (courses). The aim is to reduce the trauma," he told reporters.

    Noting that students and their parents are spending sleepless night at the time of board examination, Sibal said the government wants to make 10th exam optional for students wishing to continue in the same school.

    "If a student wants to go for pre-university course, he may appear for 10th board exam. But in case of a student pursuing the course in the same school, he need not appear in the class-10 exam for promotion to class-11," he said, adding that an internal assessment would suffice.

    The government also plans to set up autonomous overarching authority for higher education and research based on the recommendations of Yashpal committee and the National Knowledge Commission.
     
  5. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2009
    Messages:
    11,613
    Likes Received:
    5,669
    I think this is one of the better ideas so far from HRD ministry. One board for primary and secondary education will make standards of education same across the country and will give the option for students to qualify for higher education more competitive not only within state but across the country. Right now the standards in different states is different with some better than others which gives unfair advantage to students of some boards to get into central medical and engineering colleges (PMT etc) over others.

    Also I'm of the strong opinion that secondary education should be made centralized for better standards and better implementation. State boards are very pathetic at implementing secondary education and resulting in massive school dropouts.
     
  6. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    12,076
    Likes Received:
    327
    India education reforms news-Sibal moots free & compulsory education for all


    Sibal moots free & compulsory education for all

    [​IMG]

    Zeenews Bureau New Delhi, June 25: The UPA government has rolled out its plan to reform the education sector in India, starting with providing free and compulsory education and doing away with the ‘trauma’ of Class X Board examinations.

    The minister said all step should be taken to enact the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Bill, which seeks to make education a fundamental right of every child in the age group of six to 14 years.

    "The bill should be passed in this session so that every child is given statutory right to education," he said.

    Keeping this in mind, he said their focus is threefold - "expansion, inclusion and excellence, which in simple terms access, equity and quality".

    No Class X Board exams?

    addressing a press conference, Sibal said the government would abolish the Class X Board examinations to lessen the “trauma” on young students.

    "We must detraumatise students who sometimes commit suicide," Sibal said, emphasising the need for change in the system of marking.

    He said the biggest challenge the country faces at present is providing quality education to the young.

    "We will introduce a single board examination with consensus so that children can give one exam and decide which school or university they want to go," he added.

    The Congress leader said that the Class 10 board exam was not necessary as it laid undue pressure and traumatised students and parents.

    "The choice of whether Class 10 boards should be scrapped... is something that school teachers and parents have to decide," Sibal said.

    "There should be a method of assessment different from just sitting for a board exam, determining the percentages and then moving forward. There can be an alternative system and there are many such systems in the world. Percentile system is much better than the percentages," Sibal added.

    Higher educationStating that the government was committed to improve and reform education standards in India, HRD minister Kapil Sibal said an apex panel on higher education will be formed soon.

    The autonomous National Commission for Higher Education and Research, which will encompass in itself the existing professional councils and regulatory agencies, including the University Grants Commission (UGC), the Medical Council of India and the AICTE, will be formed within the first 100 days of the new government, Sibal said.

    The new education commission is a key recommendation of a government appointed committee headed by well known educationist Professor Yashpal that was formed to advise on renovation and rejuvenation of higher education in India.

    He further emphasised on clampdown on the malpractices such as ragging and the capitation fee. “We will have to have a law to punish the culprits who indulge in such activities,” Sibal said.

    The Minister also stressed on setting up of independent agency, which would regulate setting up of colleges and new Universities. 5,000 universities, colleges and institutions will be provided with broad band connectivity, he said.

    Commenting on the percentage of lesser number of students enrolling for graduation, the Congress leader said that at present the ratio stands at a low of 12.4 percent, which certainly needs a revamp and extend the rate atleast upto 25-30 percent.

    The new minister said his focus therefore is on primary and secondary education. The average school dropout rate in India is 39 percent.

    On how he proposes to improve the dropout rate, Sibal said: "This is a holistic exercise. We need to reform the school system, which I am working on. There will be community colleges, more polytechnics, vocational training, skill development centres."

    Foreign direct investment in education

    Addressing the reporters Kapil Sibal said that the government is strongly in favour of allowing foreign direct investment (FDI) in India's education sector.

    "FDI must come into India. Entry into the education sector must neither be limited nor over-regulated. I want the system to be accessible from outside too," Sibal, 61, who is a practising lawyer, Sibal said.

    Upgradation of madrassas

    In a move to increase the quality of the education of the Students studying in madrassas, he said though the government has no intention to interfere in the religious teachings, but certainly will ensure secular education to the students studying over there.

    Further, emphasising on the upgradation of the students of madrassas, Sibal said, Centre is very much focussed on modernising the education system for the Muslim children.

    Subsidised education loans

    The newly elected HRD ministers decision of subsidising the educational loans comes as a huge relief for the students as well as the paerents.

    Open distance learningIn order to expand the education system to each and every corner of the country, the government has decided to enhance the broadband system, which will help the students to study from their remote places rather migrating to different cities.

    The HRD minister also said that a National Curriculum framework will be implemented for teachers to provide them with high quality teacher training. It will be ensured the teachers appointed will rise to occasion.

    Public-private management

    Emphasising on public and private sectors to come together in imparting education, Sibal said that public-private partnership will be encouraged and if needed government owned schools will be handed over to private management, but the fee structure will be according to the government.

    IANS inputs
     
  7. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    12,076
    Likes Received:
    327
    Class 10 exam to become optional

    Education IANS

    Class 10 exam to become optional

    2009-06-25 17:10:00
    Last Updated: 2009-06-25 18:28:19

    New Delhi: With an aim to reform the examination system and 'de-traumatise the education', the government is planning to make the Class 10 exams 'optional', Human Resource Development Minister Kapil Sibal said Thursday.

    'We will reform the examination system and Class 10 examination will be optional,' Sibal told reporters here while outlining his 100-day plans for the education sector.

    'Schools will evolve a system of assessment, because of the marking system there is lot of pressure on children, parents, especially mother,' he said.

    'I have seen children committing suicide due to poor marks. I don't think that children in our country should study in pressure,' Sibal said.

    'Education cannot be traumatic for parents and children. So we will introduce a system of replacement of marks by grades in schools affiliated to CBSE (Central Board of Secondary Education) for the secondary classes of ninth and tenth,' said Sibal, adding he had himself gone through the trauma.

    He said the ultimate aim of the board examination for a student is to get admission in university so they want to evolve a single exam system.

    'We will introduce a single board examination with consensus so that children can give one exam and decide which school or university they want to go,' he added.

    He said the biggest challenge the country faces at present is providing quality education to the young.

    Keeping this in mind, he said their focus is threefold - 'expansion, inclusion and excellence, which in simple terms access, equity and quality'.
     
  8. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    12,076
    Likes Received:
    327
    Sibal unveils 100-day plan, makes Class X boards 'optional'

    Sibal unveils 100-day plan, makes Class X boards 'optional'

    Posted: Thursday , Jun 25, 2009 at 1952 hrs IST

    [​IMG]
    'By a single board, a student can decide which
    university he wants to go.'

    New Delhi: In far-reaching reforms, Government proposed making 10th board examination optional and setting up of a single school board at the national level for a uniform examination for class 12.

    A new scheme of interest subsidy on educational loans for professional courses by economically weaker students will be launched in the first 100 days of the UPA government, HRD Minister Kapil Sibal told reporters in New Delhi.

    "We must detraumatise education. It cannot be traumatic for parents and children. This is unacceptable," the Minister said unveiling the education agenda.

    Government will also introduce a system to replace the present assessment procedure of giving marks with grades which will reduce stress, he said.

    The single board would replace 33 boards in the country including CBSE and CISCE and hold a uniform examination for all students on the pattern of combined law admission test being organised for admission to law institutions.

    "By appearing in a single board, a student can decide which university he wants to go. It is happening in the law (courses). The aim is to reduce the trauma," he said adding that states would be consulted on the issue.

    Taking note of students and their parents complaining of sleepless nights at the time of board examinations, Sibal said the government wants to make 10th examinations optional for students wishing to continue in the same school.

    "If a student wants to go for pre-university course, he may appear for 10th board exam. But in case of a student pursuing the course in the same school, he need not appear in the class-10 exam for promotion to class-11," Sibal said, adding that an internal assessment would suffice.

    Government will review the functioning of existing deemed universities which have come under spotlight following allegations of heavy capitation fee charged by some of these institutions.

    An autonomous overarching authority for higher education and research based on the recommendations of Yashpal committee and the National Knowledge Commission would be established.

    Sibal said a law will be enacted to prevent, prohibit and punish educational malpractices. For the disadvantaged sections of the society, Equal Opportunity Offices would be created in all universities, he said adding a new policy on distance learning would be formulated.

    The ambitious bill to provide free and compulsory education to children in the age group of 6 to 14 will be taken up during the budget session.

    The government also wants to set up an All India Madrassa Board which will award degrees equivalent to CBSE and other boards. The board will frame policy to impart secular and technical education to Muslims without interfering with the religious teachings. "We will strive to evolve a consensus on this issue," he said.
     
  9. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    12,076
    Likes Received:
    327
    Interest subsidy on educational loans- Personal Loans News-Personal Loans-Loan Centre-Personal Finance-The Economic Times

    Interest subsidy on educational loans
    25 Jun 2009, 1928 hrs IST, PTI

    NEW DELHI: Students from disadvantaged economic backgrounds will no longer face financial problems in pursuit of higher education as the government is set to launch an interest subsidy scheme on educational loans taken by them.

    "The government is launching a new scheme on interest subsidy on educational loans taken for professional courses by economically weaker students," HRD Minister Kapil Sibal told reporters here today.

    The scheme, which is awaiting the approval of the Cabinet, is intended to make funds available for higher education to a large community of deserving students.

    Under the new scheme, students can get loans from government with subsidised interest.

    "We will give interest subsidy on education loans taken by students because we are interested in the education of poor students," he said.

    However, those students whose family income is less than Rs 4.5 lakh per annum will be eligible under the scheme. The students will avail the benefit for a moratorium period which is one year from completion of the course or six months from joining a job, whichever is earlier.

    The scheme has already got the approval of Expenditure Finance Committee. An estimated Rs 4,000 crore will be given to needy students during the 11th Plan period under this scheme.
     
  10. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    12,076
    Likes Received:
    327
    WB govt against making 10th Board exams optional

    WB govt against making 10th Board exams optional

    Posted: Thursday , Jun 25, 2009 at 1911 hrs IST

    Kolkata:

    Opposing HRD Minister Kapil Sibal's plan to reform education, West Bengal government said on Thursday it was against making the 10th board examination optional and having a single school board at the national level.

    "We are against this decision by the Centre. Our view is that the 10th board examination should continue. And there cannot be a central board for school education in the entire country," said Minister for School Education Partha Dey.

    He said the 10th board examination could not be done away with as it helped in the evaluation of a student and indicated which course of study he should pursue.

    "There are numerous secondary schools and more schools will come up in future. The 10th board examinations are required to bring a parity in standards of these schools." Dey said a single school board at the national level was not acceptable as it would rob the primary education system of cultural diversity.

    "Having a single board for the 10th standard examination will not help in a country like ours which has a federal structure. Much of the cultural diversity will be lost if such a board is set up," he said.

    In reply to a question, Dey said the state government would convey its views to the Centre on the issue. "We have done it when the Right to Education Bill was being drafted. We will do it now as well."
     
  11. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    12,076
    Likes Received:
    327
    National : Govt to evolve different models of PPP in education sector : 608067

    Govt to evolve different models of PPP in education sector

    Published: June 25,2009

    New Delhi, Jun 25 Favouring greater private participation in the education sector, HRD Minister Kapil Sibal today said the government will evolve different models of public-private-partnership (PPP).
    "We feel there is ample scope for private players to participate in the education sector. The government is evolving policy on PPP in school education. We will evolve varieties of PPP models,"HRD Minister Kapil Sibal told reporters here.

    Diverse policies are required in view of different types of facilities the government wants to create in the education sector with the participation of private bodies.

    The government is starting 6,000 model schools, one in each block. Of them 2,500 will be completely funded by the government while 3,500 will come up in PPP mode.

    The government has decided to set up 20 Indian Institutes of Information Technology (IIITs) and 700 polytechnics in PPP mode.

    The PPP models will open the door for investment and participation by charitable organisations also.

    "But the poor students will not suffer," Sibal added.
    Source: PTI
     
  12. thakur_ritesh

    thakur_ritesh Administrator Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2009
    Messages:
    4,434
    Likes Received:
    1,719
    Location:
    Land of the GODS - "Dev Bhomi".
    to say i am shocked would be an understatement and that too a pleasant one and all this happening in india and at the pace all this is happening, well well it all seems just another world to me. never did i expect the gross incompetency that our government has and with the highly incompetent babus this country has to come up with such radical measures as this one, for a change some brilliant recommendations put across by an eminent personality like pro yashpal has not been put aside by saying that the report is under review, this just shows if you have the right person as the minister, the goodies are certainly not far off, but its all about that one right person. with these measures the minister has also talked about the foreign varisity bill being moved across in the budget parliamentary session, the question keeps coming to my mind is, what is happening to india, yes i think i need to wake up to the fact, reforms are happening in the education sector and are happening big time.

    one board for all schools in india bringing every student at par with the rest of their contemporaries, with no boar exams where talent will be nurtured from early days be it in sports, science, maths, singing, etc to them having to face common entrance exams and certainly not rely on their board exams to get admission into professional institutions. government committing to compulsory 10yrs of formal education for all starting from class 1. 1,500 top notch colleges in all categories to be converted to universities with the freedom to have their own pay scales for the lecturers, with no political interference, they be allowed to make profits if that same generated money gets reinvested in the education system, with complete freedom to have industry interface, and investments allowed from all corners with emphasis from industry. ugc, aicte etc to be abolished with one single body which will supposedly have an autonomy as good as the election commission of india, which i think would not have political appointees to foreign varsities being allowed to open shop in desi land, well all i have got to say, thanks and hats off to professor yashpal and his team if any, hrd minister kapil sibal, and the babus of the ministry of hrd.

    i have always believed why should the best talent leave the indian shores to head off overseas when the real economic growth is happening in india and here is a day that would in times to come change most of that happening with the best being retained back and i am sure this will also attract some of the best brains be it professors or students alike from overseas to come to india and which in the end would raise the general education and competitive level of us indians by staying with in the country may folds. if implemented well and successfully, i can see the days when olympic gold medals to noble laureates to indian univs competing for the top slot with the best and getting that rank would all be a regular phenomenon in our great country. such a terrific day for an economically surging india and what a great opportunity for us indians to move to the next level!
     
  13. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    12,076
    Likes Received:
    327
    I agree with you completely , daredevil , this is one of the boldest and best idea taken by the Ministry of HRD, because not only the result will clear away the limitations presented by the board specific exams that only makes it harder to the educational reach to the masses irrespective of any region, as in other words it is difficult to judge the merit of the students of the different regions as in our vast motherland , different states has different curriculum sets and as well as the quality of education differs and the it is seen the students of the some particular state run boards lags much behind in the examinations like IIT , JEE, even in UPSC examination. Creating a Centralised board will simply clear away the all that, and also if disparity is seen between the merit of the students in statewise then Central fund will be invested to correct this.

    Regards
     
  14. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    12,076
    Likes Received:
    327
    This is a shock of joy to me tonight when I started to browsing the thread this evening and finding the news to posting it, also feeling my self in other world,and if this would be done will be revoluitonise the whole education system, currently, we have 68% literacy rate in our country but we do not want that literacy measured by only judging whether a person can make a full signature or not but by reading, judging, and commenting on article written on current situation. I believe proper education also make a race better. Kudos to Riteshji for have a nice analysis.

    Regards
     
  15. Antimony

    Antimony Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2009
    Messages:
    487
    Likes Received:
    9
    A very good move, though I am against the idea of making 10th Exams optional

    Partha Dey is the guy who reintroduced English in WB schools, after the Left Front handicapped nearly a whole generation by refusing to tean English in school until about the middle school level.

    He does raise a valid point here. What would be the premier medium and how would vernaculars be handled? I would not mind the premier medium to be english, but others might have a different idea. Also I would definitely like the states have some leeway with courses, especially vernacular languages

    However, these are not obstacles that cannot be overcome. In all, a good move, except for the class X part
     
  16. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    12,076
    Likes Received:
    327
    FDI in education soon: Kapil Sibal- Hindustan Times

    FDI in education soon: Kapil Sibal

    Chetan Chauhan & Ruchi Hajela, Hindustan Times
    Email Author
    New Delhi, June 26, 2009
    First Published: 01:11 IST(26/6/2009)
    Last Updated: 01:20 IST(26/6/2009)

    There’s money in knowledge with Kapil Sibal’s new deal for education announced on Thursday.

    The Union Minister for Human Resources Development promised to invite private capital — both Indian and foreign — to invest in education.

    India has a total of 219 million students of which 40 per cent are enrolled in private schools while about 142 million children are not in the school system. About 75,000 private schools account for only 7 per cent of the total number of institutions.

    In February 2008, international brokerage firm CLSA, headquartered in Hong Kong, had estimated the size of the private education market in India to be worth $40 billion (then Rs 160,000 crore).

    Of this the Kindergarten to Grade 12 (K-12) segment was estimated at $20 billion (Rs 80,000 crore), private professional colleges at $7 billion (Rs 28,000 crore) and others like preschools and vocational training at $1billion (Rs 4,000 crore) and $1.4 billion (Rs 5,600 crore) respectively.

    While the present potential is yet to be estimated, “This will be a very good move. We desperately need more investment,” Ajit Rangnekar, dean of the Indian School of Business told Hindustan Times. “The move will tempt large industrial houses to invest and stop the current drain of foreign exchange that happens when Indian students go abroad for higher studies. Our only plea is that Indian industries are given a level playing platform.”

    Sibal rated foreign direct investment (FDI) in education along with increased private participation as government’s top priority. “We will allow profit from education to be invested in setting up new educational institutions,” he said. His proposal seems to take forward a ruling in 1966 by the Supreme Court that prohibited “commercialization of education” but allowed institutions to earn “reasonable surplus” to be used for expansion of education.

    To allow profit-making, the government will have to amend Section 25 of the Companies Act, which allows companies to set up non-profit educational institutions. “But it would mean institutions would lose Constitutional protection and they will have to pay taxes like any other service provider,” said Rajeev Dhawan, constitutional expert.

    “With increased investment, the teaching community will see an upward movement as well,” Ninad Karpe, chief executive officer and managing director computer learning-centre chain Aptech Limited told Hindustan Times.

    What Indians have to watch out for though are the quality of facilities provided by private educators. Between 1956 and 1990, only 29 institutions were granted ‘deemed university’ status. In the last 15 years, however, 63 institutions were declared deemed universities and in the last five years alone, 36 institutions, excluding regional engineering colleges (RECs) have been notified as deemed universities.

    The Yashpal Committee has recommended a slew of measures to ensure transparency in allowing private education providers into the market.

    Sibal’s proposal comes a day after publishing house Pearson announced plans to invest $30 million (Rs 145 crore) in education companies Educomp and TutorVista.
     
  17. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    12,076
    Likes Received:
    327
    One nation, one board: Are we ready for it? - Delhi - Cities - The Times of India

    One nation, one board: Are we ready for it?
    25 Jun 2009, 2355 hrs IST, Manash Pratim Gohain, TNN

    NEW DELHI: If Kapil Sibal has his way, the 33 state boards in the country may be on their way out as could be the Central Board of Secondary Education
    (CBSE), to be replaced by a single board. And a single "board examination'' in class XII.

    Sibal's flashy "100 day plan'' has impressed many but the feasibility of such a vast exercise and the logistics of actually implementing the conversion is something that the government may need to work very minutely upon, warn academics. There is a catch too. If the move will remove the stress of class XII boards, won't it double that of the class XII examination?

    Says Dr Jayanti Dutta, a clinical psychologist and a faculty of Delhi University, "At the age of 15 when the child takes class X examinations he gets a practical feel of his own capabilities and of where he stands. So when class XII happens he is more prepared. Universalisation of education needs to start right from nursery. Isn't class X a little too late?''

    The constitution of the new board, says former CBSE chairman Ashok Ganguly requires a lot of thought and planning. "The first concern is that the very credibility of our internal assessment is so low that how does one judge students? Moreover the heterogeneity of our schools - while some schools have the best of facilities and teachers, a large number of them don't even have blackboards - is a huge impediment in standardisation of education. It is a good move, but there has to be some kind of assessment of the progress made by both the student and the school,'' Ganguly - who is now in charge of the Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan in Uttar Pradesh - said.

    But the good thing about the proposal is that it seeks to change the system of allotment of streams. "Teachers know a student's interests the best. So if a one-off examination stops being the criterion for stream selection, we will prevent a lot of problems arising out of wrong choice,'' said Pragya Srivastava, joint commissioner of Kendriya Vidyalaya Sangathan.

    Welcoming this de-stressing initiative, principal of Laxman Public School
    , Usha Ram said: "We have been waiting for this for a long time and had made representations. This should be implemented systematically now.''

    The very format of a single board would mean that the text books and the quality of teaching become crucial and with that will come massive preparations in the nature of a curriculum framework and also teachers' training.

    S L Jain, chairman of National Progressive schools Conference, said: "Even under a single board a lot of decentralization would be needed as there are a lot of concerns to be taken care of. Then there will be schools having primarily first generation learners, schools in tribal areas and schools with no teacher. In such a situation a uniform system is not possible. Simply introducing uniform text books and syllabus does not ensure uniformity. The challenge is to ensure uniformity in infrastructure and quality of teachers.''

    Apart from replacing the present assessment procedure of giving marks to awarding grades, the government would also explore the possibility of setting up an independent accreditation body for schools to ensure quality.
     
  18. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    12,076
    Likes Received:
    327
    UP too offers Class X students a hand

    UP too offers Class X students a hand

    Posted: Friday , Jun 26, 2009 at 0055 hrs IST

    Lucknow: Coinciding with Union HRD Minister Kapil Sibal’s announcement in Delhi of his 100-day plan including making Class X board exams “optional”, the Uttar Pradesh Cabinet on Thursday gave the go-ahead to education reforms suggested by a panel set up by the state.

    It accepted the recommendations of the high-powered committee headed by Additional Cabinet Secretary V S Pandey, regarding reforms in Class X exams held by the state education board, including introduction of grades, credit system, and compartment, from 2010 onwards.

    In the new system, a student would be declared passed if he clears five of the six subjects. Until now, a student was declared failed if he didn’t clear even one subject. In the last board examination, around 5 lakh students had dropped out in the middle and over 13 lakh failed.

    Beginning 2011, the month-long examination process would also be cut short to just six days, by having just one examination for each subject, including science. Currently, each subject in the UP board has two to three question papers. Sources said that from 2011, these reforms would also be gradually introduced at the intermediate level.

    If a student fails in two subjects, he will be given a chance to sit for an improvement or compartment examination. If he clears it, he can move to the next class the same year. At present, there is no such provision.

    However, if a student fails in more than two subjects, he cannot be promoted the same year. But next year, he will have to appear for just those subjects in which he failed. Marks of the subjects which he had cleared the previous year would be credited to next year and added in his marksheet. A student can adopt this system for up to three years and there will be no mention of this in the fresh marksheet.

    While the grade system does not completely do away with the marks system, there will be no mention of the grand total, the total percentage, or division in the marksheet. Only marks in individual subjects would be given, with grades against each.
     
  19. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    12,076
    Likes Received:
    327
    Govt backs scrapping Std X board exam - Mumbai - Cities - The Times of India

    Govt backs scrapping Std X board exam
    26 Jun 2009, 0133 hrs IST, Prafulla Marpakwar, TNN

    MUMBAI: The Maharashtra government has expressed support for Union human resources development minister Kapil Sibal's proposal to scrap Std X board exams, saying there is no need for constant evaluation of students before they reach Std XII. However, state minister of higher, technical and medical education, Rajesh Tope, said, "I feel that before taking a final decision, there should be a wider debate on the reforms in education.''

    Sibal and others on Thursday welcomed the reforms proposed by Sibal. "The concept is certainly revolutionary. In my opinion, there is no need for the Class X board exam. There must be a debate and we must expedite the decision-making process,'' Tope told TOI.

    Tope observed that it is high time that the academic community and the government examines the stages of a student's evaluation. "If students are in the same school from Std I to XII, there is no need for their frequent evaluation,'' said Tope, a mechanical engineer-turned-politician.

    Endorsing Sibal's views, a senior education department official said that while there is debate about a single board conducting the HSC examination, there is unanimity on abolishing the Class X board exam. "In view of the introduction of the 10-plus-2 exam system, the Class X exam has lost its significance. We feel that a decision on abolishing the Class X exam should be taken forthwith,'' the official said.

    The official said that when most schools have internal exams for Std VII, the same pattern should be followed for Class X. Since the Class X exam is conducted by the state board, at least 20% of the students who don't succeed are thrown out of the mainstream. "This is a national loss, as many of them give up further education,'' he said.

    The official said, Sibal rightly pointed out that if the Class X exam is abolished, it would reduce the burden not only on students, but parents too. "Let there be less tension and less trauma for students and parents. We must support the steps initiated by the Yashpal committee on education reforms and the proposals made by Sibal,'' he added.
     
  20. I-G

    I-G Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2009
    Messages:
    2,736
    Likes Received:
    53
    BJP slams Sibal's education plans

    New Delhi (PTI): The BJP on Friday dubbed as "directionless, illogical and impractical" the reforms mooted by the HRD ministry in the education sector and said that states were not taken into confidence in the matter.

    Though education is in the Concurrent list, states had not been consulted by the minister, senior BJP leader Murli Manohar Joshi told reporters.

    "This is a federal government, a federal constitution.States have rights. Every state has different requirements and problems in education, especially in primary and secondary education," Mr Joshi, a former HRD minister, said.

    Expressing concern over HRD minister Kapil Sibal's "hurry" to announce reforms within the first 100 days of the UPA government, he said "The requirement in North-East will not be there in Kerala... vocational education requirements in Gujarat will not be there in Rajasthan. And what is required there will not be required in Tamil Nadu".

    He said in 100 days the UPA has to do something and since it cannot do anything, it wants to destroy education.

    "This cannot be permitted."

    The Hindu News Update Service
     
  21. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    12,076
    Likes Received:
    327
    State boards can stay, says ex-UGC chief Yashpal

    State boards can stay, says ex-UGC chief Yashpal

    [​IMG]
    Members of DSO protest against Yashpal committee
    recommendations in Kolkata on Friday. Express
    photo

    Shiv Sahay Singh
    Posted: Saturday , Jun 27, 2009 at 0357 hrs IST

    Kolkata: A day after Union Human Resource Development Minister Kapil Sibal mooted the idea of doing away with state boards for Class X exams in the country and instead came up with a single board for Class XII, former UGC chairman and the chairman of the steering committee of National Curriculum Framework, Prof Yashpal, said there is no problem if the state boards exist.

    Yashpal, who was in Kolkata on Friday, said that in his recommendations regarding the National Curriculum Framework 2006 he had suggested the abolition of “traumatic board exams”, but not to do away with the state boards. “It is possible to have different boards in the country and I did not recommend any such initiative,” he said, adding that the state boards can exist even when the examinations are made optional for the students.

    “If students are to continue with the same school in Class XI & XII what is the point of taking the board exams,” said Yashpal, insisting that the schools can go ahead with the assessment process which they have been following till Class IX.

    Yashpal was speaking to the media on the sidelines of an interactive session with various vice-chancellors at the University of Calcutta on Friday.

    Various state governments, including the West Bengal government, have dubbed this move of doing away with the state boards as an attempt at “over-centralisation” of school education.

    On the issue of a disparity in the terms of assessment of the academic parameters across a well-governed and an ill-governed school, Yashpal said there will be no disparity and a better institution will remain better.

    He suggested that the infrastructure of various government schools should be upgraded.

    He also suggested that some alternative plan of evaluation will have to be there for students who cannot continue after Class X.
     

Share This Page