Indian Defense Acquisitions - Co- Developments and Production

Discussion in 'Indian Army' started by .v0id, Mar 25, 2009.

  1. .v0id

    .v0id FOUNDER Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    Messages:
    371
    Likes Received:
    24
    CAE, HAL Finalize Contract to Establish Helicopter Training Centre in Bangalore

    CAE, HAL Finalize Contract to Establish Helicopter Training Centre in Bangalore



    A joint venture of Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) and CAE has finalized all necessary contracts and non-recourse financing to begin construction and development of a new C$60 million (Rs 240 crore) helicopter training centre in Bangalore, India.

    The Helicopter Academy to Train by Simulation of Flying (HATSOFF), the joint venture equally-owned by HAL and CAE, has secured long-term, non-recourse financing to support the development of the HATSOFF Helicopter Training Centre. HATSOFF will have a CAE-built full-mission simulator featuring CAE's revolutionary roll-on/roll-off cockpit design, which enables cockpits representing various helicopter types to be used in the simulator. HATSOFF expects to begin training at a new purpose-built facility in the second half of 2010. When fully operational, HATSOFF will be able to train up to 400 helicopter pilots each year and expects to generate annual revenues of up to approximately C$20 million (Rs 80 crore).

    "HATSOFF will serve a critical need for enhancing safety and mission readiness by offering high-quality simulation-based helicopter training programs to India and the surrounding region," said Marc Parent, CAE's Chief Operating Officer. "We are also pleased that financial institutions recognize the value of our business plan and the required training assets, which gives us the ability to raise non-recourse financing to support our expansion efforts in India."

    Initially, HATSOFF will offer comprehensive training to civil and military customers operating four helicopter types: the Indian Army/Air Force variant of the HAL-built Dhruv, the civil variant of the Dhruv, the Bell 412 and the Eurocopter Dauphin. The training centre will feature multimedia classrooms, computer-based training, brief/debrief facilities, and a training management information system. The CAE-built full-mission simulator for HATSOFF will feature a common motion system, vibration platform, and visual display system, and four separate cockpit modules that can be used in the full-mission simulator. When a cockpit is not used in the full-mission simulator, it will be used as a fixed-based flight training device (FTD). The simulator will be certified to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and Joint Aviation Authority (JAA) Level D, the highest qualification for flight simulators.

    "We are excited to be part of the first Level D simulator training facility to be built in India for helicopter pilots and maintainers," said Mr. Ashok K Baweja, Chairman, HAL. "HAL is committed to being India's premier aerospace organization, and part of that commitment includes enhancing safety and efficiency throughout the aerospace community. The HATSOFF Helicopter Training Centre will play a key role in training and producing skilled and mission-ready crews."

    CAE, HAL Finalize Contract to Establish Helicopter Training Centre in Bangalore | India Defence
     
  2.  
  3. EnlightenedMonk

    EnlightenedMonk Member of The Month JULY 2009 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2009
    Messages:
    3,831
    Likes Received:
    23
    Hmmm... another added advantage which will give an addition to the sales pitch with the HAL Dhruv...

    I hope this translates into more orders and more money...
     
  4. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    20,305
    Likes Received:
    8,270
    Location:
    011
    The Khaki Fidayeen

    [​IMG]

    As gunfire crackled in the snowscaped Srinagar chill of early January, with two fidayeen fighters—wholly rolled, strapped and sold to their ‘cause’—holding Lal Chowk’s Punjab Hotel under seige, a handful of Kashmir’s police officers were overcome with déjà vu. And itchy fingers, that burning need to be there as part of the operation, countering terror with all they’ve got. Equally if not more dedicated to India’s own cause, the legitimate cause of Peace in the Valley, these men in khaki are clear they have what it takes—if only the government would deploy them. Back in 1989, when the insurgency broke out, the J&K Police was ill-equipped to handle it; some policemen were even suspected of sympathy with insurgents. Today, the force actually has police officers trained in counter-terrorism. Most of them are Kashmiri Muslims, and when they say they would’ve wrapped up the 26/11 job in just ten hours, it doesn’t sound like an empty boast. They’re India’s Khaki Fidayeen. Open profiles five such policemen. They’ve already helped steady things in J&K, and are raring for action...

    JAVID AHMED

    Inspector


    The information was soild, “Ek dum pukhta,” as the informer told Inspector Javid Ahmed. A militant had been spotted inside a college in Shopian in south Kashmir. There was no time to lose. Javid and his three men rushed immediately—as the inspector recounts.

    At the college ground, Javid saw a young man near a motorcycle. As Javid approached, the young man pulled out a grenade. Unfazed, Javid jumped at him, even as two of his own men ran away. “I held his hands tightly in mine while he tried hard to pull the pin,” says Javid. The third policeman, who hadn’t fled, stood paralysed with fear while Javid’s fight went on. It lasted for almost five long minutes before Javid finally managed to loosen the militant’s hands. The grenade landed on a road nearby, beyond the college wall, but luckily did not explode.

    If Javid has a charmed life, he’d rather not test it so brazenly again. “I have promised myself that I won’t act so brave again,” he says.Javid comes from a policeman’s family. His father was once in charge of the Tral police station in south Kashmir, a post which he has since taken charge of. During the peak of militancy in Jammu & Kashmir (J&K), it was common for policemen and their families to get threats from militants. Javid’s father got many such threats, and even survived a landmine blast.

    Javid’s first posting after graduating from the J&K police academy in 2002 was in Shopian, a Jamaat-e-Islami stronghold and thus a tough challenge. According to a senior police officer, militancy here reigned until mid-2000; the police feared for their lives and dared not take action. Javid, however, would have none of it, vowing to resist militants every turn of the way. “From day one, I had vowed to eliminate militancy,” he says.

    In some four years, Javid led operation after operation in Shopian, resulting in the elimination of at least 25 top militant leaders, including the Lashkar-e-Toiba’s deputy district commander. “Wherever I am, I will keep fighting militancy, no matter what,” he says.

    IMTIYAZ HUSSAIN

    Superintendent of Police


    The man opened fire the moment Police Officer Imtiyaz Hussain asked him who he was. “Tu kaun hai?” Hussain remembers shouting at the man sitting under an apple tree. It was an orchard in north Kashmir’s Sopore.

    Hussain had his eyes fixed on the figure in the distance when he suddenly saw metal glisten in the bright afternoon sun. Instead of revealing who he was, the mystery man, Abu Abdullah, had pulled out an AK-47 rifle. The police officer could have died that very instant had it not been for his namesake, Constable Imtiyaz Ahmed, who jumped in front of his boss and took the AK-47’s bullets in his lower abdomen.

    Abu Abdullah was no ordinary gunman. He was a hardcore Lashkar terrorist, sent to carry out a fidayeen attack in Srinagar. It was just hours before he was to head for the state capital that Hussain, who was then Sopore’s superintendent of police, got a whiff of his plans. At the encounter in the orchard, Abdullah had fought fiercely, so fiercely that he wouldn’t let the police party rescue Imtiyaz Ahmed, who lay wounded in the line of fire. Shards of apples flew in all directions.

    It took Hussain an hour to get near Abdullah. And then he shot Abdullah dead from a one-foot distance. “I tilted his rifle away from myself and shot him with my pistol,” recounts Imtiyaz. But Constable Ahmed, sadly, couldn’t be saved.

    Hussain belongs to the 1999 batch of the J&K Police. “It is called the fidayeen batch,” he quips. He joined as a deputy superintendent of police in Shopian, in south Kashmir, which was then the region’s hotbed of militancy. But it was from 2006 onwards in Sopore that Hussain faced the most difficult phase of his career.

    At that time, Sopore was the hub of terrorist outfit Lashkar-e-Toiba. Most fidayeen attacks which took place in Srinagar would be orchestrated from Sopore. Hussain’s main objective was containing the Lashkar. Unless the police sent out a strong message by instilling the fear of death in militants, he felt, it wouldn’t be possible to contain militancy. His big moment came in November 2006, when he successfully managed to bump off Osama Pehalwan, chief of the militant outfit Al-Mansurian. Pehalwan had led a string of attacks against the Indian Army.

    In another daring operation, Hussain recalls scalping senior Lashkar commander Hafiz Nasir. On an informer’s cue, Hussain and team zeroed in on the militant hiding along with two Jaish operatives in Rafiabad, near Sopore; the three were planning a fidayeen attack on the cavalcade of then J&K Chief Minister Mufti Mohammed Sayeed, according to intelligence inputs. As the team lay siege, Hussain, who was accompanied on the operation by an Army colonel, was instructed by his seniors to rush to a site where the CM was supposed to address a public rally. But once he left, the militants broke out of the cordon. Two Army soldiers were killed, and Hafiz Nasir took refuge in another house. Hussain was called right back. He was in favour of blasting the house, but the colonel wanted to be sure—and took a peep inside. Nasir shot him. “He died on the spot,” says Hussain. It was only afterwards that he and his police team managed to kill Nasir.

    In another input from Rafiabad, an informer told Hussain that four militants were hiding inside a house. Hussain says he sent a police party thrice into the house for a search, but the militants could not be found. Finally, when the informer called a fourth time, Hussain lost his patience, calling the informer a liar. “Cut my throat if you don’t get them,” the informer whispered.

    This time round, Hussain accompanied the search party himself. They searched the entire house. But, like three previous attempts, Hussain couldn’t find anything. He was about to call it off when he spotted a black-and-white TV set in one corner of the house. “I don’t know,” he says, “but I had this gut feeling that there is something there.” The police officer ordered his men to dig beneath the TV set. Even after a couple of feet, they found only earth.

    “Sir, there is nothing here,” one of his men told him. But Hussain insisted that they keep digging. After a foot or so, they came upon another layer of concrete. And beneath it, they discovered a bunker, measuring 6 feet by 8 feet. Sure enough, there were four militants holed up inside. Hussain asked them to surrender. They wouldn’t.

    “Finally, we got it filled with water,” says Hussain, almost cringing at the memory. It was in a similar manner that Hussain and his men were able to eliminate Sajjad Afghani, the J&K chief of terrorist outfit Harkat-ul-Mujahideen, in 2008. Afghani was hiding above a false ceiling in the residential quarters of a government hospital employee, and had been an active militant for ten years in north Kashmir. Hussain knew. “Many Pakistani boys work for us,” he discloses, “providing us vital information about militant activities in Kashmir.” He has also intercepted many calls from across the border, asking militants to kill certain people. “I have saved the life of at least a hundred people by shifting them to safe places.”

    It is on a Sunday that Hussain, a legend in these parts, finally finds time for Open. His bulletproof vehicle has broken down recently. This puts his life in danger. But there are also other hardships he must put up with in daily life. For example, he stays in rented, not police, accommodation.

    The rewards are meagre. Police officers in J&K rue the fact that the men who risk their lives get a pittance as allowances—Rs 200 as risk allowance is all that a policeman gets. Compared to that, an Army soldier gets Rs 5,000 per month as risk allowance. So, at a time when so many young men of his age were crossing the border to join militant outfits, how did Hussain choose the police?

    “Three of our boys died in an encounter... and a militant from Multan also. Tell me, will a Kashmiri mother cry for her three boys or for a militant from Multan?” is his succinct response.

    The superintendent gets a call on his mobile. And it is then that I recognise his caller tune. It’s a song from a 1965 film on Bhagat Singh’s life: ‘Eiy watan, eiy watan, humko teri kasam, teri raahon mein jaan tak luta jaayenge...’

    MOHAMMED IRSHAD

    Superintendent of Police


    When the fidayeen entered Punjab Hotel in the heart of Srinagar last week, one man was immediately summoned: Mohammed Irshad. Till recently the SP, Special Operations Group, he is a reclusive man who lets his personal weapon do the talking. And true to his reputation, Irshad’s team eliminated both fidayeen fighters in a few short hours. “We drilled holes from the wooden roof, shielding ourselves behind iron plates and then shot them,” he says.

    Today, the very mention of cargo (Irshad’s erstwhile office was in a building that had housed the cargo section of Indian Airlines) is enough to send shivers across the spines of militants. Inside his office, the first thing that strikes you is a big map of Kashmir. Pinned across the map are names of top militant commanders. Some of them, crossed out. Eliminated. Irshad, clearly, brooks no nonsense. His first posting was in the militant-crawling Doda region, where he is believed to have wiped out most Hizbul cadre. “Once he achieved that, the Lashkar couldn’t sustain itself there in the absence of Hizbul support,” says a senior police officer and colleague.

    Modus operandi? In the Valley, Irshad forged a reliable network of informers, some of whom even had the guts to infiltrate militant ranks.“We have our men in every tanzeem (outfit),” says Irshad. Like all other officers who dared take militants head on, Irshad has had his share of near-death experiences. Once, during an encounter in Telbal, two Lashkar militants jumped out of a window of their first-floor hideout, into a street behind where Irshad and another senior police officer were standing. The militants fired a volley of bullets which they escaped by ducking to the ground. The militants killed five police personnel and injured three others.

    Irshad and his men chased them, and one of them was taken down just 2 km away from the original encounter site. “The other died in another encounter, two months later,” reports Irshad.

    The superintendent also remembers a search operation in the Bandipora area, where, acting on specific information about militants inside a house, they laid siege to it. On entering it, they couldn’t find any. An exhausted Irshad sat with another officer on a box for almost 15 minutes, discussing what to do.

    Finally, they left the building, calling off the operation. It was five days later that a militant was caught, and he revealed that he was hiding in a bunker beneath that very box all that while. “He said he was about to fire at us, but I walked away at that very moment,” recounts Irshad.

    Irshad does not share details of his work with his family. “Most of the time, they don’t know what I have been up to, but sometimes they come to know of it through media reports.”

    “And then they get worried.”

    AFADUL MUJTABA

    Senior Superintendent of Police


    At first sight, Afadul Mujtaba doesn’t look like a policeman. He looks more like a rich carpet dealer. But ask the separatist leadership of Kashmir, and you will hear what this man is made of. As SSP, Srinagar, Mujtaba once stirred up a fiery debate in the Valley by citing the Hadith (passed-down accounts of the Prophet Muhammad’s sayings), arguing that pelting stones was un-Islamic. Such unruly mob behaviour has always been a big headache for the police, with disgruntled youth using the slightest provocation to gather at various spots in the city and turn bricks and stones into missiles (veteran mobsters could even injure cops by hurling flat stones through the cracks of their cane shields). But after Mujtaba made his Hadith reference, the separatist leadership found itself divided. Some of them agreed with Mujtaba, while others argued that stone pelting was the only weapon of the weak. It even prompted a senior separatist leader to hold a seminar on the issue.

    But Mujtaba didn’t leave it at that. Sources talk of his novel methods to corner some of the regular stone pelters. Under one such plan, he asked some of his plainclothes men to blend in with stone pelters, but equipped with Bluetooth hands-free mobile kits. As they joined the pelting, the undercover cops led some of them towards the police cordon. Once close, the plainclothes policemen turned on the stone pelters, pushing them towards their trap lying in wait.

    Plus, Mujtaba has also been part of some of the police’s fiercest encounters with militants. His colleagues swear by his agility during such high-risk operations in the Valley. He has handled many that involved terrorists on deadly suicide missions. Mujtaba himself keeps a low profile, reluctant to discuss his feats with anyone.

    “I am just doing my job,” he says, with a smile which disappears in a second.

    AASHIQ BUKHARI

    Assistant Inspector General


    Budgam district is the first militant-free district of Kashmir. There was a time when there were more than 200 ‘most wanted’ militants operating in this area. Most of them were done for once Aashiq Bukhari took over the reins of the police in the district. Once posted, he lost no time in leading extensive operations against militancy, and with undaunted energy.

    In one such operation, the police managed to catch a bus-load of arms coming from the bordering town of Kupwara. In another search operation, they discovered three truckloads of liquid explosives hidden in a bunker (its hatch hidden under a commode) in the Chanapora locality.

    “We got that damn house blasted,” says Bukhari. He has been instrumental in the killing of about 300 militants. Some top militants were even given instructions to bump off the brave police officer. One of them was a dreaded Pakistani militant married to a local woman, Ali, who was later killed by Bukhari’s men.

    None of the assassins could get him. “The Army is for the borders,” he says, “It is only the local police which can deal with militancy.” He is also against what he calls the “sarkari goondaism” (official hooliganism) of the Army. “The soldiers in the Army convoys carry these long bamboo poles and threaten people moving around. This alienates people further and creates hatred for the man in uniform,” says Bukhari, shaking his head.

    “But, of course, the militant always fires the first shot.” He fires right back.

    The Khaki Fidayeen | OPEN Magazine
     
  5. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2009
    Messages:
    11,613
    Likes Received:
    5,670
    Its not fair to compare religious fidayeen and Khaki fidayeen, but let me do it to show the difference between these guys.

    Khaki fidayeen are ready to lay down their lives to save the people from getting killed and in the line of duty for the country while the religious fidayeen aim is to kill the innocent people in the name of religion for getting their 72 hoors. Speaks a lot about the the dedication of khaki fidayeen compared to the loony religious fidayeen. Time to kill these religious fidayeen in their homes itself.
     
  6. kuku

    kuku Respected Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2009
    Messages:
    507
    Likes Received:
    2
    Fidayeen is a not a correct word if it means a suicidal person, they are our flesh and blood, fighting to keep the nation safe, this whole fidayeen thing is strange.

    A strong state police will take care of the problem, i remember that people involved in the high days of insurgency in Punjab said that insurgency weakened only after the state police was strengthened.
     
  7. RPK

    RPK Indyakudimahan Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2009
    Messages:
    4,882
    Likes Received:
    130
    Location:
    13° 4'60.00"N 80°16'60.00"E
    Indian Army Puts Out Slew Of Small Arms RFIs

    LiveFist - The Best of Indian Defence: Indian Army Puts Out Slew Of Small Arms RFIs

    The Indian Army is in the market for a series of new small arms systems and accessories. Requests for Information from global contractors have been issued this month for a new 5.56 mm Close Quarter Battle Carbine (CQB Carbine), a new 7.62 mm Light Machine Gun (LMG) -- both with optical sights -- and a list of eight accessories for its Israeli TAR-21 assault rifles, including telescopic sights, accessory rails, dual magazine clips, self luminous reflex sight for the UBGL and single eye night vision with head band.

    The Indian Army has also put out a crucial RFI for the successor to its L-70 and ZU-23MM-2B guns, but more on that later.


    [​IMG]
     
  8. VayuSena1

    VayuSena1 Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2009
    Messages:
    200
    Likes Received:
    13
    It is to no one's surprise that Kashmiri Police department is considered one of the best in terms of tackling terrorism apart from Gujarat police who is logistically one of the most advanced police in the country. I wonder what Delhi Police Department has to say for this for being the capital of the country and equipped with the most rude, uncivilized and pathetic officers any country's capital could ever have.
     
  9. A.V.

    A.V. New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    6,503
    Likes Received:
    1,106
    Location:
    Moscow, russia
    CAE and HAL helicopter training centre

    CAE and Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) announced on the eve of the Rotary Wing Society of India's Heli-Power conference, that their joint venture company - the Helicopter Academy to Train by Simulation of Flying (HATSOFF) - was progressing on-schedule for the opening in mid-2010 of India's first Level D helicopter simulator training facility.


    The CAE-built full-mission helicopter simulator for HATSOFF is currently en route to India following the completion of manufacturing and in-plant acceptance at CAE's facility in Montreal, Canada. The simulator is scheduled to arrive in Bangalore later this month to begin installation at the new HATSOFF helicopter training centre. The first cockpit for the simulator represents the Bell 412 helicopter, and is scheduled to be ready-for-training this summer.

    "We are excited about the creation of this new training centre that will serve the needs of helicopter operators in India," said Wing Commander (Retd) Chandra Dat Upadhyay, Chief Executive Officer of HATSOFF. "Simulation-based training is one of the best approaches for improving safety and operational efficiency, and the HATSOFF training centre will play a key role in producing skilled and mission-ready helicopter aircrews." The CAE-built full-mission simulator en route to India features CAE's revolutionary roll-on/roll-off cockpit design, which enables cockpits representing various helicopter types to be used in the simulator. Beginning this summer, HATSOFF will offer comprehensive training to operators of the Bell 412 helicopter. Additional cockpits for the Indian Army/Air Force variant of the HAL-built Dhruv, the civil variant of the Dhruv, and the Eurocopter Dauphin will be added over the next year.
    The training centre will feature multimedia classrooms, computer-based training, brief/debrief facilities, and a training management information system. The CAE-built full-mission simulator for HATSOFF will feature a common motion system, vibration platform, and visual display system, and the four separate cockpit modules that can be used in the full-mission simulator. When a cockpit is not used in the full-mission simulator,


    http://www.defenseworld.net/go/defensenews.jsp?id=4137
     
  10. ZOOM

    ZOOM Founding Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Messages:
    577
    Likes Received:
    10
    Such state of the art ground based training system will certainly go a long way in minimizing the trining on trainer versions of Heli saving lots of cost.
     
  11. nandu

    nandu Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2009
    Messages:
    1,913
    Likes Received:
    162
    Location:
    Jamshedpur,INDIA
    This will certainly improve the skills of helicopter crews as well as save lot of time
     
  12. venkat

    venkat Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2009
    Messages:
    904
    Likes Received:
    195
    But its for Bell helicopters. can this be extended to Dhruv where our Army and airforce new recruits can have a first hand flying experience!!! seems to be aimed at commercial pilot training!!!
     
  13. sandeepdg

    sandeepdg Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2009
    Messages:
    2,333
    Likes Received:
    216
    Location:
    Gurgaon/Noida
    Its mentioned in A.V.'s post, that additional cockpits for the Dhruv and Dauphin will be added next year.
     
  14. Maverick007

    Maverick007 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2009
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    2
    Why have not planned to put in the simulators for MI-17 and MI-35 as we use these helicopters a lot for transport and attack duties..........Plus we have many more MI-17s on order
     
  15. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2009
    Messages:
    10,397
    Likes Received:
    2,314
    L&T, Raytheon, Join on T-72 Upgrade

    India's L&T, Raytheon, Join on T-72 Tank Upgrade

    By vivek raghuvanshi
    Published: 17 Feb 2010 10:46




    NEW DELHI - U.S. based Raytheon has joined hands with India's private sector defense major Larsen & Toubro (L&T) to bid for the Indian Army's T-72 tank upgrade. The announcement was made at DEFEXPO India 2010, currently on show here Feb 15-18.
    M. V. Kotwal, L&T's senior executive vice president, heavy engineering, said so far only a memorandum of understanding has been inked between L&T and Raytheon on submitting a bid for the T-72 upgrade. Under the proposal, Raytheon will provide infrared imaging sights and electronics to improve targeting accuracy and increase tank lethality.


    "L&T is the only Indian company in the private sector that is leading a team for the T-72 upgrade program. The L&T and Raytheon combination has what it takes to deliver on such an important program," Kotwal said.
    The Army proposes to upgrade more than 1,400 T-72 tanks for more than $1.5 billion. The upgrade will include a new fire control system, a thermal imager, new radios, a fiber-optic gyro-based navigation system and a laser warning system. Improvements also will be made to the tank's nuclear, biological and chemical protection.
    Fritz Treyz, vice president, Raytheon Network Centric Systems India Operations, said, "together, we are exploring other opportunities to provide net-centric modernization defense solutions to meet growing demands in India and the global marketplace."


    http://www.defensenews.com/story.php?i=4502392&c=ASI&s=LAN
     
  16. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2009
    Messages:
    13,206
    Likes Received:
    6,638
    Location:
    Telangana/India/Bharat
    'Anti-terror buggy' unveiled by firm in India

    'Anti-terror buggy' unveiled by firm in India

    A mini armoured car, designed for use in confined spaces such as airports and hotels targeted in terror attacks, has gone on display at an Indian arms fair.

    The battery operated, two million rupee ($45,000) Anti-Terrorist Assault Cart (Atac) is said to resemble a bullet-proof golf buggy with firing ports.
    It has been specially designed to transport two armed security personnel during or after terror attacks.
    It was created in the wake of the Mumbai (Bombay) hotel attacks of 2008.
    The attacks in November 2008 took place in two luxury hotels with gunmen surrounded by security forces for about 60 hours. One hundred and sixty-five people were killed in the attacks, including nine gunmen.
    The company behind the cart, Metaltech Motor Bodies Pvt Ltd, said the Atac had been designed in the aftermath of the attacks.
    'Helplessness'
    "It can extract civilians or engage terrorists," Metaltech managing director JB Sehrawat told the AFP news agency.
    "It's a product of our sense of helplessness over the casualties we took in the attacks. We put our heads and hearts together and came up with the Atac."
    It weighs just under half a tonne, has bullet-proof windows and contains numerous firing ports. Furthermore it is able to negotiate corridors and lifts.
    Metaltech says the squat and heavily armoured vehicle can also withstand grenade blasts and last for six hours on a single charge - with a top speed of 25km/h (15mph).
    The company said it was offering a prototype of the vehicle, which drew applause from visitors and military scientists attending the arms fair in Delhi, for trials with the sponsors of the Commonwealth Games, due to be held in the city in November.
    India has had to reassure foreign countries that those games and next month's hockey World Cup in Delhi will be safe and free of terror attacks.
    "Given the growing threats, we need nano-engineering such as the Atac," Metaltech Vice President SW Thatte said.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/8520467.stm
     
  17. tarunraju

    tarunraju Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2009
    Messages:
    5,316
    Likes Received:
    3,887
    Location:
    Hyderabad
    [​IMG]

    For $45K that's a great offer. Every police department can afford a couple of these. Just strap it with an RPK-74, and you're good to go for under $50000. Perfect example of "necessity breeds innovation".
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2010
  18. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    20,305
    Likes Received:
    8,270
    Location:
    011
    RPK 74 ? serious ? a functioning .303 with a trained personnel will turn out perhaps to be the most effective urban CT weapon.
     
  19. p2prada

    p2prada Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    May 25, 2009
    Messages:
    10,233
    Likes Received:
    3,896
    Location:
    Holy Hell
    Wow. An armoured REVA. What next?

    It is quiet good for 2 people. But, I wouldn't want my tyres shot.

    Put in an automatic .50cal machine gun on top and it will be the real deal.
     
  20. tarunraju

    tarunraju Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2009
    Messages:
    5,316
    Likes Received:
    3,887
    Location:
    Hyderabad
    With Indian police, you'd rather have a so-so person handling an RPK-74 than a sort of trained person with a .303 :p. RPK-74 is decent with its stocks fixed onto a surface, and has a 100-round drum.

    [​IMG]

    But wth, those are gunports. You can stick a pichhkari out if you want to.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2010
  21. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,536
    Likes Received:
    6,537
    Raytheon says bidding for India tank upgrade

    http://news.alibaba.com/article/detail/markets/100249638-1-update-1-raytheon-says-bidding-india.html

    Raytheon says bidding for India tank upgrade

    NEW DELHI, Feb 12 - Raytheon Co, the world's biggest missile maker, said on Friday it and partner Larsen & Toubro have bid for the contract to upgrade 1,000 T-72 battle tanks in India.

    Defence ministry officials said India was looking to spend at least $100 million in upgrading the tanks, which India bought from Russia three decades ago.

    "The upgrade will increase the lethality of the T-72 tanks," Fritz Treyz, vice president, Raytheon (India operations), told Reuters.

    Ratheon has a tie-up with engineering and construction firm Larsen & Toubro in India.

    The upgrades will include weapons and computer systems and enhance its operation by night.

    India, one of the world's biggest arms importers, wants to spend $50 billion buying and upgrading weapons over the next five years.

    Treyz said Raytheon will also launch the "fish hawk", an anti-submarine warfare weapon system next week in India.
     

Share This Page