Indian couple arrested in Oslo: Government won't intervene

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by Blackwater, Dec 2, 2012.

  1. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2012
    Messages:
    20,986
    Likes Received:
    11,813
    Location:
    Akhand Bharat
    Oslo/New Delhi/Hyderabad: As the families of the Indian couple arrested in Norway for alleged abuse of their seven-year-old son anxiously await the verdict on Monday, the Indian government seems reluctant to intervene in what it sees essentially as a legal case.

    "This is an issue that relates not to the government. It relates to a private citizen and to the local law of that country...Sometimes, we express concern about something that happens to the citizen of our country but within the parameters of the law as is applied by those countries...But of course there is public interest and concern. Our Mission will make contact and do whatever is appropriate and necessary," External Affairs Minister Salman Khurshid said.

    The government's cautious approach comes following an appeal by the families of the couple to intervene in the matter. Chandrashekar Vallabhaneni and his wife Anupama have been charged with "gross repeated maltreatment" of their child by "threats, violence or other wrong". The prosecution has proposed a jail term of 15 and 18 months for the mother and father respectively. The Oslo District Court is expected to deliver its judgement on the couple on Monday. The duo, hailing from Andhra Pradesh, was arrested on November 26.


    Indian couple arrested in Oslo: Government won't intervene, say sources

    Mr Vallabhaneni works with software giant TCS, which deputed him to Oslo 18 months ago to handle a project. He took his wife and two sons - seven-year-old Sai Sriram and two-year-old Abhiram - along with him. Sai Sriram was found wetting his pants in the school bus which was reported to Mr Vallabhaneni, who in turn allegedly threatened the child that he would be sent back to India if he repeated that again. "It might be a false allegation (criminal charge) that they (police) are framing...I don't accept that," Mr Vallabhaneni's nephew V Sailender told reporters in Hyderabad after meeting Chief Minister Kiran Kumar Reddy on Saturday evening.

    Mr Vallabhaneni's family claims that child welfare authorities took Sai Sriram away earlier this year but returned him to his parents after two months after medical tests established that the child had minor behavioural problems. The family also says that the authorities were convinced that it was in the best interest of the boy to stay with his parents and that his safety was not under threat.

    The family returned home in July. But Mr Chandrasekhar returned to Norway for work in November and was issued court summons, after which he was arrested along with Anupama, who had travelled to attend the court hearing with him.

    According to a statement by Oslo Police Department, the couple has been remanded in custody, as there is reason to fear that they will evade prosecution by returning to India.

    Speaking to NDTV, Anupama's lawyer Marte Svarstad Brodtkorb said it was wrong to keep the couple in prison in Norway. "If the court sentences them, we will appeal against it," she said. "They (couple) have done everything they have been told to do," Ms Brodtkorb said, adding, "they didn't hurt their children...they had some difficulties in handling the boy but they didn't hurt him and they didn't mean to do anything wrong. They tried to get help but they did not get any help."

    Mr Vallabhaneni's mother and sister say they were informed by a colleague of his arrest. The Norwegian authorities have not contacted them nor elaborated on the charges against the couple, they allege.

    Meanwhile, in a letter to the government, Anupama's father Veerabhadra Rao has pleaded for help, saying couple's children were crying, not eating and were insisting on seeing their parents.

    "In successive reports that I have faxed to the lawyers in Norway, I have said the child who showed so much improvement has begun to deteriorate physically and emotionally after separation from his parents. Physically because his appetite is gone and he is not eating. He is not sleeping well because he would always like the cuddle of his mother to sleep," said Sai Sriram's psychiatrist Kalyan Chakravarthy.

    A few months ago, another Indian couple in Norway - Anurup and Sagarika Bhattacharya - were involved in a prolonged custody battle with Norwegian authorities after their two children were taken away by child welfare services in May last year.


    Indian couple arrested in Oslo: Government won't intervene, say sources | NDTV.com
     
  2.  
  3. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2012
    Messages:
    20,986
    Likes Received:
    11,813
    Location:
    Akhand Bharat
    good decision by Indian govt.If u can not obey law of land,no body can help.

    tough i had close shave my self in holland:taunt::taunt::taunt:
     
  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    The parents scolded the child for wetting his pants repeatedly in school.

    If that is a wrong thing, then one wonders what is wrong.

    If parents cannot lesson their children, then why have children who then become yahoos like that Scandanavian who shot up people in a radicalised frenzy.

    If Norwegian law wants that children should wet their pants, then maybe the child should have been told gently to go on a wetting spree and do it on the teacher's lap! And maybe the child could be encouraged to empty his bowels on the teacher too! After all, as per the Norweigan law, it is just a minor behavioural aberration!

    I am sure some copy cat, diamond oozing, champagne drinking, caviar eating glitterati chatterati of an air conditioned Delhi spacious drawing room with rare artifacts from all over the world, would take up the cue and start moving the Supreme Court for 'justice' for such cases in India!

    Three quarters of Indian parents would be jailed!

    And those who can't be, but were on the cyber space, would still be jailed through Sec 66a for annoying!

    As far as Khurshed is concerned, he can threaten that he will make blood flow of those who can do nothing against him since he is a Minister, but he runs scared when pitted with equals as is this case where he should protect the Indian citizens and not cast them to the wolves.

    Vadra maybe right - Banana republic with Ministers who are banana!
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2012
    parijataka and jackprince like this.
  5. lcatejas

    lcatejas Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2010
    Messages:
    710
    Likes Received:
    255
    Location:
    Bharat
    Another story for our stupid media...
     
  6. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    My take is different.

    If it were not for the media, one more Indian would have been hauled over fire and coals with our Govt as usual turning a blind eye to the people of Indian Orgin's woes.

    It is true that one has to obey the law of the land they are in, but it requires official interaction to make the foreign govt understand Indian cultural issues with greater sensitivity.

    Compare it with the US Govt's interventions all over the world.

    Take the case of Pakistani Christians charged with blasphemy.

    The Blasphemy Law is Pakistan's law. It is not a very pleasant one and the law is totally not in conformity with the rest of the world culture.

    Therefore, if the US intervenes and achieves it aim, how is that justified, when the person charged is not a US citizen and it has nothing to do with the US?

    In this case, it is Indian citizens affected.

    Should the Indian Govt not intervene?

    If there was not the media, the scams that have happened would have never been known, nor would we know of Indians incarcerated abroad.

    Yes, the media goes overboard, but they also serve the nation to some extent.
     
    parijataka and jalsa like this.
  7. Norway child abuse row: couple sentenced to jail


    Hyderabad: The Indian couple facing child abuse charges in Norway has been sentenced to jail. An Oslo District Court found them guilty on several counts of child abuse and ordered that Chandrasekhar Vallabhaneni is to spend 18 months in jail and his wife Anupama 15 months, in line with the sentences proposed by the prosecution. A press release issued said the couple can appeal against the verdict at the Borgarting Court of Appeal.

    In the view of the Court, the couple deliberately burned their son's leg with a hot spoon or similar object with the result that the child had burn marks measuring approximately 3 x 5 centimetres.

    The Court also found that it had been proven that the parents had on several occasions hit the child with possibly a belt or similar object and that they had on one occasion threatened to burn their son on his tongue with a hot spoon. The proven abuse took place over a period of six to seven months and therefore falls under section 219, first paragraph, of the Penal Code on repeated maltreatment.

    The court has recognised that the parents were facing difficulties in dealing with the child but has pronounced the verdict because repeated maltreatment had caused pain and fear to their child. The court also notes that the imprisonment can be challenging for the kids and family. That is the big concern. The MEA has said they would continue to extend consular assistance but it does not seem inclined to intervene any further.

    The couple is accused of deliberately burning their son's leg with a hot spoon because he did not speak the truth on one occasion. They had reportedly threatened and hit him with possibly a belt on several occasions between October last year and March this year when there were regular complaints from school about his behaviour. The court has noted that the couple was finding difficulties in parenting and had been in regular touch with the school about challenges faced by the child. The court also notes that the school misled the couple on why they could not get support services. Mysteriously, an Orange Book that contained messages exchanged between the school and the parents over several months, has gone missing.

    Sailendra, nephew of Chandrasekhar says Chandrasekhar requested the court and the police to take the Orange Book, the complaint book, the regular diary of the child as evidence. But that mysteriously went missing. The main evidence was that.

    At their home in Hyderabad, 7-year-old Sai Sriram and his baby brother 2-year-old Abhiram don't know that it is going to be a long wait for them to meet their parents. Their primary caregivers have been Chandrasekhar's 24-year-old nephew Sailendra and Anupama's younger brother Nani. Both maternal and paternal grandparents are elderly and don't have the energy, strength or confidence to take care of these two young children.

    As soon as news of the verdict came in the form of a phone call from Chandrasekhar to his nephew, Chandrasekhar's father fainted and his father-in-law had to be rushed to hospital.

    Radhakrishna, Chandrasekhar's brother says, They have separated parents from young children. My father fell unconscious on hearing this. My mother has not eaten for three days. Anupama's father had to be admitted to hospital. The children, the younger one specially, has been crying out for his mother.''

    Abhiram is hardly two and was still being breastfed by his mother before she left for Norway on the 23rd of November. Sai Sriram, already diagnosed with mild to moderate ADHD or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder needs medication to be given everyday, and care and attention round-the-clock. Their parents tried their best in taking care of their two young boys. The question is what care will these two innocent children get now with their parents away and will it be better than what their parents were able to give them.
     
  8. jamesvaikom

    jamesvaikom Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2012
    Messages:
    367
    Likes Received:
    293
    Parents should punish their children. But I don't think burning with hot spoon and beating with belt are ways to punish children. I don't think children will urinate in school van intensionally. According to me brave children urinate less than children who fear their parents. In Indian most parents punish their children very hard. But that doesn't mean they are doing right. These children will misuse their freedom when they get freedom during college days.

    Last year when similar incident occurred then our medias claimed that children were sent to foster homes because their mother gave them food with her own hand. Few days latter their father filed divorce and claimed that his wife had mental problems. I don't know why our medias are not giving importance to problems faced by Indians in Middle East countries.
     
  9. I can see that some senior members here have a different take and while i understand that taking away a child's parents might have even worse consequences

    I for one am extremely happy with this verdict, for the example it sets.

    Indian Parents have a habit of using an inappropriate amount of force, in the name of disciplining the child ,
    any wonder that Indians in general lack the initiative to be leaders, and are generally submissive and timid.

    Let this be a lesson to all trigger happy Indian Parents who consider their children as private property

    I hail this verdict. Period

    The Indian media ofcourse would do everything to depict the couple as a loving parents who were
    just 'teaching manners' to the kid.
    The way i see it Indians thinks its their their God given right to break the bones of a child they have reared, and should better know that not every one empathizes with their bestial sensitivities.

    Good Move .

    I hope MEA does nothing.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2012

Share This Page