Indian Air Force of the Future

Discussion in 'Indian Air Force' started by pyromaniac, Apr 5, 2009.

  1. pyromaniac

    pyromaniac Founding Member

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    The Dilemma

    Planning for the future has always been a daunting task, especially when it concerns the military of a nation. As the military is a vital component and in fact the ultimate instrument of national security, improper assessment or gross miscalculation of its pattern of development can have catastrophic ramifications. The task of forward planning is rendered particularly difficult in a scenario where long term plans need to be evolved in a coordinated fashion amongst the three wings of the Armed Forces - the Army, air-force-2Navy and the Air Force. Also, for any long term planning to be meaningful, two inputs are prerequisites for military planners - a clear long term strategic vision for the nation, and assured availability of resources commensurate with national security imperatives, in that order.

    In the Indian context, the lofty and fiery rhetoric on both these aspects emanating from the highest levels of governance have rarely crystallized into reality. Over the last six decades since Independence, in the Indian Air Force (IAF) there has been piecemeal acquisition of hardware as cleared by the civilian bureaucracy to be sanctioned by the political leadership on the basis of stand alone case-by-case justification and not in conformity with any long term national plan. Possibly there has been none. The process of acquisition of new equipment has generally followed a pattern of one to one replacement with equipment procured from a source that is either the cheapest, politically expedient or both. Acquisition of hardware has often been contingent not on the availability of resources but on allocation of funds.

    Obsolescence In The IAF

    For decades the IAF had largely been tethered to one non-western source. Much of the inventory acquired through this route has now been overtaken by obsolescence. As a result, in recent years, there has been an alarming erosion in combat power and other capabilities. Even after prolonged and reportedly vigorous effort, the indigenous Research & Development Organisations and the Aerospace Industry have not been able to provide a respectable degree of self reliance to the IAF. The near total dependence on foreign sources for cutting edge technology and frontline equipment is potentially perhaps the most debilitating factor that often threatens to seriously undermine the capability of the IAF. Despite the limitations, the IAF has managed to attain and project an image of a potent force capable to preserving the sovereignty of the Indian skies and in more recent times, to project power albeit limited in quantum and reach. And even in the future there appears to be no option but to procure advanced technology and hardware from abroad. There is however an attempt to indigenize products through co-development, co-production and the difficult, but innovative, concept of “Offsets”. Though not the best, this route is the most expedient under the circumstances to accord military hardware a semblance of Indian character.

    air-force-4Life of a modern weapon system is in the region of thirty years which is normally extendable by another 10 to 15 years after a mid-life upgrade. New equipment procured for the IAF over the next decade will remain operational up to 2050 at the very least, possibly up to 2060. As the nature of warfare itself is undergoing transformation, it is necessary to make a comprehensive reassessment of the contours of the operational scenario that the IAF will have to contend with and reconfigure its inventory accordingly. To do this at this point in time, the IAF needs to take note of India’s regional power status in the emerging world order and assess its possible role and responsibility in the new geopolitical and geostrategic environment.

    The Pakistan Factor

    air-force-3In view of the asymmetry, Pakistan is unlikely to take the initiative for large scale conventional military operations against India. While it will continue to retain the capability to put up stout defence against any assault, as indications are, it is more likely to engage in clandestine warfare against India in a variety of ways, some of which were amply demonstrated by way of attack on the Parliament in 2001 or the raid on Mumbai in November 2008. Such operations should no longer be seen as purely internal security problems. Our land and sea borders are extensive and quite impossible to seal through measures on the ground - such as erection of physical barriers or through the deployment of paramilitary forces/civil police that are riddled with porosity on account of corruption. In the present scenario, it is relatively easy for the well trained enemy agents or commandos collectively described by India as “terrorists”, to penetrate unsecured borders and inflict disproportionately high levels of damage and human casualties. It should not come as a surprise if the various religious, political and social divides that afflict the nation actively facilitate such operations by the enemy.

    Despite the perceived success in the recently held elections in the State of Jammu and Kashmir, the end to the turmoil is not in sight. There is no doubt that Pakistan will continue its campaign in the state, in all likelihood, with renewed vigour and intensity to turn the tide against India. The techniques of warfare and tactics adopted by Pakistan in J&K will be similar to those employed by other regions in India and possibly with an enhanced level of support from the local populace.

    The induction of nuclear weapons in South Asia has added a new dimension to the Indo-Pak military confrontation. Pakistan is believed to have unknown quantities of Chinese supplied nuclear weapons and has the capability to deliver these using surface-to-surface missiles with adequate range to cover most important cities and targets of strategic value. India too has nuclear weapons and has one advantage over Pakistan wherein the latter lacks strategic depth. In order to neutralize the Pakistani nuclear threat and raise their threshold substantially, India needs to enlarge her own nuclear arsenal and diversify her delivery capability with bias towards surface-to-surface missiles complemented by combat aircraft in the ratio 75:25. The nuclear warfare capability needs to be developed to the extent necessary to obliterate most cities in Pakistan in a single strike and this capability must be clearly made known to them by direct or indirect means. With such a capability in being, there would be a high probability that Pakistan would be deterred from first use of nuclear weapons. Although the President of Pakistan, Asif Ali Zardari has proclaimed a “no first use” policy, it would not be prudent to take this assurance at face value and neglect or delay the build up of own capability. We need to bear in mind the principle that nuclear weapons are not meant to win but to prevent wars.

    Against the traditional enemy with whom India has fought three major conventional wars since Independence and who now is engaged in aggressive subversion in different parts of the country, it should be clear that in the future, the traditional military posture will progressively become less relevant as the clandestine warfare of the future will have no clearly defined fronts. This would necessitate redefined doctrines and restructured inventory. First and foremost, there has to be a profound qualitative change in the capability of surveillance and communication intelligence through extensive employment of aerial platforms. Surveillance platforms parked at medium to high altitudes must be capable of providing resolution of a few centimeters with all-weather capability through cameras in the optical and infrared frequency range, Synthetic Aperture Radar or other new generation sensors to be introduced in the future. These advanced sensors need to be mounted on new generation Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) with continental range and high endurance capable of being controlled and operated thousands of miles away from parent base through satellite based data link. Such a system can provide round-the-clock cover of any part of land and sea frontiers as also inland areas of the nation. This will obviate the need to reposition the bulky control infrastructure in different parts of the country. The airborne platforms must also carry powerful and agile sensors to record, identify and pin-point the source of all radio transmissions on a wide range of frequency bands. Intelligence gathering through UAVs on continuous patrol would have to be supported by high speed, possibly automated intelligence data processing and analysis systems, which should include capability of integration with intelligence inputs from other agencies. Threat thus analyzed must be available in the shortest possible time to security agencies required to respond. For swift response, an effective method is vertical envelopment through a heli-borne force with the helicopter fleet dedicated to this task, data linked with the UAV to get a real time view of the objective.

    air-forceThe ever increasing cost of fixed wing combat aircraft and their weapons, as also substantially enhanced lethality of enemy air defence weapon systems, would render employment of such aircraft both in the deep strike role and in the tactical battle areas, less and less cost effective in the future. It would be necessary therefore to place greater reliance on surface-to-surface missiles for deep strike against heavily defended targets in depth such as airfields. In the tactical battle area the fixed wing combat aircraft would have to be replaced by Unmanned Aerial Combat Vehicles (UCAV) and rotary wing platforms with stand-off weapons, both integrated with the ground forces. Fixed wing aircraft when employed would have to be effectively protected through versatile electronic warfare capability. Strategic Air Defence capability of the IAF would have to be augmented through the enlargement of the fleet of AWACS and AEW aircraft . These systems would effectively close the prevalent gaps in the low level surveillance capability of the IAF. Simultaneously, it would be necessary to induct new air defence missile systems for area and point defence and revamp electronic warfare capability across the board.

    China, an Emerging Superpower

    Riding the wave of stupendous economic growth, China has emerged as a major regional power and has clear aspirations to be a global power in the not too distant future. Despite prolonged dialogue, there has been no progress in the settlement of Sino-Indian border dispute and none is likely in the foreseeable future. China is a nuclear power and is currently embarked on a major upgrade of its somewhat outdated military machine. She has enlarged her sphere of influence in Asia and has effectively thrown a cordon around India through political, economic and military support to all the immediate neighbours. India’s growing proximity with and subservience to the US consequent to the Indo-US nuclear deal, has clearly pushed India on to the opposite side of the international political divide. With this development, the possibility of rapprochement with the emerging superpower has practically receded into oblivion. In the long term perspective, China is potentially a greater military threat to India than Pakistan is.

    Thus it would be unwise for India to depend solely on diplomacy or support of the US to secure the nation against the awakening giant in the north. The limitations of diplomacy without the backing of military power have so clearly been exposed in the confrontation with Pakistan in the wake of 26/11. If India’s diplomatic demarche has not succeeded against Pakistan which is relatively a weak state, it would be naive to assume that it will be effective against China. The character and level of threat from China is qualitatively different and the nation’s armed forces must be geared to meet the long term threat beginning to loom over the horizon. Finally it would be the armed forces that would have to face the consequences of diplomatic failure and bear the brunt of a Chinese offensive in any form.

    First and foremost, the IAF must have the capability to counter China’s nuclear capability through a missile based credible nuclear deterrence. Simultaneously, the Sino-Indian borders need to be kept under surveillance through satellites and unmanned platforms. The IAF must also acquire the capability to launch precision attack in mountainous areas from high altitude using advanced precision guided munitions. In addition, it must have the capability to neutralize targets with mobile units of surface-to-surface missiles with conventional warheads in coordination with target data obtained from UAVs.

    Space

    A completely new dimension in future wars would be the employment of space-based assets for reconnaissance, surveillance and communication. There has been some progress in this area but much more needs to be done. However, the new problem that is emerging is the security of the space-based assets. There appears to be no clear solution at this point in time except for multiple redundancy which may be expensive and impractical. In addition to space-based assets, the IAF needs to acquire the capability to neutralize space-based capability of the enemy through hard or soft kill techniques with weapon systems located on the ground or mounted on airborne platforms.

    Power Projection Capability

    A major responsibility of the IAF in the future would be in the area of strategic airlift. Internal security compulsions will place growing demand for the movement of quick reaction as also regular security forces within the country on short notice. Given its emerging regional power status and the newly forged strategic partnership with the US if not abrogated by the incoming administration, India may be called upon to project power in the region which may involve airlift of large military forces to areas of interest of either of the partners in the region outside our borders and to provide sustained logistic support. Strategic airlift capability of the IAF would therefore need to be built up practically from scratch as the existing fleet is fast approaching the end of its total technical life. At the tactical level, the IAF should be equipped with a fleet of medium tactical transport aircraft and helicopters capable of speedy response with special forces over shorter ranges.

    The IAF has taken some baby steps towards acquiring the capability of projecting combat power in the region. At this point in time, the capability is limited to a token force and cannot be described as significant. However, while steps are in hand to augment the existing fleet of long range combat aircraft as also to acquire a new fleet, the capability of power projection would in the ultimate analysis be limited by the size of the fleet of in-flight refuelling aircraft. This fleet would have to be suitably enlarged for any meaningful power projection that is capable of making an impact.

    Summary

    To summarise, the IAF needs to enhance some of the force multipliers already on the inventory as also to develop a range of new capabilities both in the strategic and tactical regimes. At the strategic level, the IAF must be able to provide the nation with credible nuclear deterrence against Pakistan and China. Also, it should be capable of power projection in its perceived area of national security interests and those of our ally in the region beyond the national borders with combat aircraft, in-flight refuelling and strategic airlift capability. These forces should be geared to provide swift response to a crisis situation and be able to provide logistic support to sustain forces for significant length of time. For strategic strike deep into enemy territory, the IAF needs to have a combination of missile based and airborne platforms, the latter with powerful electronic warfare equipment to suppress and defeat enemy air defence systems. Tactical roles may be transferred to UCAVs and helicopters.

    To provide effective air defence of the homeland, the IAF needs to acquire a fleet of AWACS and AEW aircraft over and above the few already on order to enhance surveillance capability at low level. New generation area and point defence missile systems need to be inducted to replace the ageing and obsolete systems currently deployed. For strategic and tactical intelligence, the IAF must have its own satellite systems and a fleet of UAVs with a range of advanced sensors to provide all weather day and night capability. The fleet of UAVs should be adequately supported by appropriate ground infrastructure for automated and speedy processing of intelligence information, and fleet of tactical transport aircraft and helicopters for quick response with special forces.

    It goes without saying that in future wars, the IAF must be geared to operate in a network-centric environment. But perhaps most important of all, there is the imperative need for the IAF to shed the defensive mindset.

    Air Marshal BK Pandey is former AOC-in-C Training Command, IAF.

    http://www.indiandefencereview.com/2009/03/indian-air-force-of-the-future.html
     
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  3. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    I think for a future warfare, IAF's strength should be at 45-60 Squadron.
    So, that we can dare and deter China, also the ASAT Command should be raised up as soon as possible. The command should be rested upon IAF , not army.

    There must be an electronic war fare cell.

    IAF should enter induct EA-18G Growler like Aircrafts. Now, India can partner Russia and Israel or France doing that.
     
  4. ZOOM

    ZOOM Founding Member

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    Our overall defence procurement system is punctuated by sever kickbacks on account of Bribery and Corruption, that too from several IAF personnal. Even trusted Partners like Isreali Defence Industry are no longer remain subject to anymore faith. DNA newspaper has exposed Rs. 600 crore bribed being paid to IAI and agreement for MRSAM was signed without floating any tender. All this serious kickbacks are becoming major reasons for inductions of mass scale homegrown systems like SAMs despite their proven capability. Even our Defence Minister quote our SAMs as arachic and outdated. Under such cirumstances it is very difficult to estimate scale of the IAF.
     
  5. threadbrowser

    threadbrowser Regular Member

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    I would like to see more emphasis on CAS from the InAF. Better and more accurate fire support for our troops would go a long way.
     
  6. kuku

    kuku Respected Member

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    The Air Marshal really talks of almost all the points one could make, he is involved with things so would know a thing or two about it all.

    As far as i am concerned, really please for heavens sake give the brave aerobatics demonstration team of the InAF modern planes, I just love the moves they pull off and we know they deserve better.

    I hope they get some sexy MiG-29OVT if the MiG gets the MMRCA, if it does not, just give them whatever comes from MMRCA or the new advanced trainer tender.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. SATISH

    SATISH DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

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    But sir, I prefer to see CAS aircrafts in the Military aviation wing rather than the IAF. It would be more useful as the planning would be easier. And the IAF can fly top cover for them.
     
  8. threadbrowser

    threadbrowser Regular Member

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    Staffing and funding a dedicated army military aviation wing would be hugely expensive.
    Fixed wing aircraft usually belong to air forces, they have the assets and personnel to operate them.
    Rotary assets on the other hand are used by most armies.
    The main thing needed is for air force officers to be assigned to specific units as FACs and a specific doctrine developed for calling in CAS.
     
  9. SATISH

    SATISH DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

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    Manned CAS aircraft are out of date nowadays...I would prefer unmanned CAS aircrafts. But a A 10 Warthog or a thunderbolt will be a great addition.
     
  10. Shiny Capstar

    Shiny Capstar Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

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    Do you (or anyone for that matter) have any information on cooperation between the IA and IAF, principally CAS.
     
  11. kuku

    kuku Respected Member

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    Plenty of views/reports from various sources exist about the conflicts/wars, and some about the recent air exercises.
    http://lmgtfy.com/?q=INDIAN+AIR+FORCE+CLOSE+AIR+SUPPORT
     
  12. Angelis

    Angelis Guest

    Yeah, i read a paper on evolution of joint doctrine for the armed forced which explicitly stated that rotary wing division of army and fixed wing division of air-force would work in tandem in suppression of enemy fire. Also that india should have min 60 squadrans to project power in south-asia. Hope they come up with mrca soon, the time frame that trials beginning now and ending 2010 then negotiations for two more years is laziness. I wish to see the first mrca delivered by no late than 2012. Tejas mach 2, if it comes out, would be a valuable addition.
     
  13. venom

    venom DFI Technocrat

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  14. icecoolben

    icecoolben Regular Member

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    According to an analysis paper i found on south asian analysis,for india to project power in south asia it requires 60 squadrans.. Our air force doctrine has put that number to 2030. I've found many who say iaf's sanctioned strength is 39.5 squadrans while the upper limit set by the government is 45. The air-force hopes to achieve this by 2020. Our cold start doctrine pegs this number at 55 squadrans. But miserably v are down to 32. How do u suppose our military planners hope to reach their targets.
     
  15. Sabir

    Sabir DFI TEAM Senior Member

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    Translation of VENOM's post (for those who are too lazy to translate it....it's done by google translator...so dont ask me if you find problems in sentence construction)
    Long arm Fifth Generation
    Research Institute of Instrumentation Tihomirova AFAR created for advanced multi-fighters
    2009-08-14 / Viktor Litovkin

    Visitors Aerospace Salon in Zhukovsky, which opens on 18 August, and professionals who visit the MAKS-2009, is awaiting a sensation. Meet with her, they will be able to stand on behalf of Tikhomirov Instrument Research Institute in the pavilion № F-1, which would take United Aircraft Corporation. Immediately between exposure «Sukhoi» MiG and, near the training rooms of our famous aircraft. And highlight of the exhibition NIIP, which, of course, be sure to write the world's press, will sample the active nature phased array (AFAR) X-band, designed for advanced multifunctional fighter.

    . Obviously SENSATION

    Why the emergence of the AFAR sensation? The answer to aviation experts - the obvious. Yet no country, no company, including the famous Northrop Grumman and Raytheon, which makes similar products for F-22A, F-16E / F Block 60 or F/A18E/F, on any show is not shown «live »AFAR. And in the Farnborough and Le Bourget, and Berlin, and in Dubai - anywhere they are the largest international airline lounges, stands for the most promoted foreign companies have always shown only models and models of this antenna. But never a valid sample. For many obvious reasons. Including fear of competitors

    NIIP named Tihomirova decided to act up. Why? Not only in order to emphasize the high level of Russian design ideas, which, thank God, still preserved in some local defense enterprises, scientific research institutes and design bureaus, but also to show the following. With the unification of the elements of its design and the selected design solutions based on a sample to be presented at the MAKS-2009, believed the institute may be established AFAR to modernize various radar systems. Including the families of fighters Su-27 and Su-30, as well as for their brethren under the brand name MiG, for ground-based systems for military and civilian purposes.
    Specialists NIIP in a conversation with the author of these lines of stress that they have submitted in Zhukovskiy AFAR done that, fundamentally, to the domestic element base nanogeterostruktur based on GaAs technology and advanced antenna systems to electronically controlled beam (AU EUL). Tihomirovtsy more than 40 years of dealing with electronic scanning. The first in the world aircraft phased array (AFD), which they developed, have been installed in the system of management of arms «Barrier» on distant fighter-interceptor MiG-31, adopting a more in 1981.
    But, of course, presented a sample far outpaced its progenitor on energy efficiency and the ability to manage a broad form of the beam, as well as the regimes of work. Before meeting with specialists NIIP I read in one of the special editions that AFAR - the basis of intelligence of current and future fighter aircraft, which allows to solve a complex variety of combat missions, the effective implementation of the various regimes «air-to-air» and «air-to-face». And can provide significant advantages on such indicators as the radiated power, noise ratio, scanning sector range, etc.
    As explained to me to specialists, the quality BRLS with AFAR contribute not only to detect multiple air targets at maximum range (previously seen - earlier defeated), but that is particularly difficult to constantly maintain these goals, regardless of their maneuvers, maintenance up-down of our fighter aircraft, right-left or turn to various on-course, roll and pitch. And if the radar can continuously keep the objective «of slots sight», then, I think it is doomed.

    If you talk about AFAR very simple - tell me the general director of NIIP Yuriy White - we have to understand that the traditional Locator - separate antenna, receiver, transmitter and receiver in AFAR with the transmitter and the antenna splits into smaller parts, into modules. And many of these modules represent AFAR. That is, each small yacheechka and their thousands, and contains a transmitter and receiver. In antenna «merge» All of the high-frequency radar. In addition, with AFAR radar capabilities to provide high reliability. Including the application of microwave radiation. Previously, if, for example, came out of the transmitter, the aircraft became blind. And it struck one or two cells, even a dozen, while the other thousands of works.

    ON-BOARD INTELLIGENCE

    BRLS with AFAR - this is the basis of «intelligence» of modern fighter aircraft, which ensures compliance with all terms of the numerous and diverse challenges facing its pilot and weapons system. It is designed to help the pilot to solve many problems of air combat - from the conquest of the air and anti-missiles to defeat the enemy of small ground and surface targets. This assumes a dramatic increase in the level of automation control system arming (SUV). Maximum release of the pilot of the management functions with on-board systems, focusing his attention on solving tactical problems. This is important for multifunctional combat aircraft, especially for single
    - The promising fighter - said Yury Bely - is no longer just a locator in the usual sense, and an integrated electronic system, which includes radars in several wavelengths, as well as identification systems, EW and other necessary equipment. And all this is tied into a single ideology, a common vision, will provide, as is now fashionable to formulate, «Battle synergistic effect».
    Do tihomirovskoy AFAR there is one more feature, which is incidentally mentioned in the beginning of this material - the basic components to it - modules - are available on the automated line capable of mass production. Professionals know that to make any «glandule» in a single copy, including the international exhibition is called, the knee - not a problem. The Soviet Union was famous for its exhibition products, astonished the audience at the world fairs, but found them in stores or on the streets of Russian cities, it was impossible. And to ensure that this does not happen with AFAR, the state has provided a tremendous technological rearmament of enterprises of the Moscow - fryazinskogo «Istok», which now makes two-transmitter modules, of which, as a cell in the hive, and is going to AFAR. Build two production lines. One - the crystal output, which makes chips. Other - assembly, where these chips are collected in the chips, then they are integrated into the antenna elements. This specialized microchips ultrahigh frequency (UHF). Monolithic integrated circuits microwave - Microwave IIAs. World standard of specialized components. The more of these elements, the more powerful radar. A number of modules in the antenna can reach up to several thousand.
    NIIP director Yuriy White stressed that this is the most automated production in which almost excluded the human factor. The equipment is mainly foreign, including Japanese. The fact that our country is not made. And in general this technology, which today is used in creating our AFAR, formerly in Russia was not.
    Yuri Ivanovich did not tell me how much they produce locators.


    - Everything is done under specific orders - he explained. - But there is power «Istok», there is a power NIIP, we are also engaged in production, is the power of our serial Ryazan instrument factory, which in the long run will collect BRLS with AFAR. We will now pass it the necessary documentation and technology. There, under the program builds a new production building with new equipment ...
    «In principle we are prepared to 50 aircraft a year to equip their radar», - has assured the White Jury.
    Head NIIP noted that the term AFAR they are going to produce not only for the locators promising fighter, but also for other types of weapons. Steerable phased array antenna technology to produce grids should be unified. They can be used in all types of armed forces. Including in the perspective of anti-aircraft missile complexes large range, created in the Corporation aircraft «Almaz-Antey» (here the same principle: «first saw - then won»), as well as MANPADS medium-range type «Book». Maximum uniformity of time and give the maximum effect on the value. The more locators, so they are cheaper for the consumer. Americans than to win? They ran a similar technology in civil proceedings - in a system of communication and navigation system for the prevention of collisions on the roads and railways ...
    - Of course, our locator to «Zhiguli» no place - looks Yury - import cars - well, they are closed to us by copyright. But metropoezd - please. At locomotives - as well. Trying to interest railroaders such prospects improve traffic safety and the passengers. While on the way to the many artificial bureaucratic hurdles.

    The future belongs YOUNG

    I could not, of course, do not ask about who was involved in creating a new AFAR, and the relevance of this system is that young people who, as I told the general director of NIIP (see the «NSS» of 25 April 2008), has to work in the institute.
    - These guys, - said the White - have a direct bearing on the creation AFAR. I would say, decisive. The young radio engineer and designers, we have gained 4-5 years ago from the MAI, Baumanki, Ryazan Radioengineering, Taganrog University, technologists from Togliatti, a Ivanovskiy technology (we have extensive cooperation, trying to recruit the best, of course), job, gain experience in passive steerable phased array lattices and actively. In general, in our institute about 400 people who are below 30 years. A direct challenge AFAR were thirty to forty-man of this age. And when it was necessary to assemble the dish by a certain date, they even slept in the booth, as in wartime, working around the clock. Not got. Most importantly, because this new technology, new technique - it is their environment, and youth is very cool all this develops.
    And actually, I was the fellow journalists in the institute a year ago and then said: wherever you come in - all the young faces in the model stands, the assembly, the configuration of modules ... It gives hope that the institute has a future. But the director is still not satisfied - not even the youth, «old» much more. Director of courage - in a crisis of our times - embarked on a construction of a hostel for young professionals. However, outraged by the fact that our «permission» System Construction terribly zabyurokrachena (the building can be constructed for the year to achieve a building permit - and little of two years). And with free financial problems. That would be where the state needs help! And then talk to all levels of the critical situation with the personnel shortage OPK and tangible things not seen. It is hoped that niipovtsy to cope with this challenge, how they coped so far with all its technical problems

    Yes, I almost forgot. At the air show MAKS-2009, at the stand of Tikhomirov Instrument Research Institute, will be shown more and AFAR L-band. Intended for installation in socks reject wing fighter. She also performed on the modern hybrid-integrated home technologies and provides electronic beam scanning in a wide sector of angles in azimuth and a broad band of frequencies. This locator as AFAR X-band, gathered in the NIIP, which was created for this unique laboratory-testing facilities, including those equipped with the latest modern technology anechoic chamber.
     
  16. venom

    venom DFI Technocrat

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  17. RPK

    RPK Indyakudimahan Senior Member

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    domain-b.com : Boeing lines up products for the Indian defence market
    [​IMG]

    New Delhi: Boeing will bid for an Indian Air Force tender for 22 combat and 15 heavy-lift helicopters. Proposals for the combat helicopters have to be submitted by 22 September and those for the heavy-lift ones a day after.

    This is a second issue of tenders for attack helicopters with an earlier tender, issued last year, scrapped in March this year by the government. Boeing had not made an offer for the earlier tender, constrained probably by the lack of end-user monitoring (EUM) and technical assistance agreements (TSA) between India and the United States. If so, then this will not pose any problems now with the recent signing of these agreements by both nations.

    Image: Boeing Photo


    Meanwhile, the signing of the EUM and the TSA clears the path for the implementation of an $2.1 billion contract for the purchase of eight Boeing P-8I long-range maritime reconnaissance aircraft for the Indian Navy. The contract had been signed on 1 January this year.

    ''The agreement will make it easier to share important US defense technology with India,'' Boeing has said in a statement.

    Boeing now says it also keen to offer India the C-17 Globemaster III, a giant transporter, which can carry large equipment, supplies and troops directly to small airfields.

    ''The C-17 fits in well with India's operational requirements,'' says Vivek Lall, head of Boeing Integrated Defense Systems in India. ''The U.S. government received a request for information in 2008,'' he said.

    Unconfirmed reports suggest that the Indian Air Force may be considering acquisition of atleast ten C-17s - initially through the US government's Foreign Military Sales route.
     
  18. venom

    venom DFI Technocrat

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  19. RPK

    RPK Indyakudimahan Senior Member

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    Air Mobility in the Very Large Dimension
    [​IMG]

    The C-17 continues to be a major player in the heavy air transportation business

    06:35 GMT, August 24, 2009 defpro.com | Even though not one of Boeing’s newest products, the C-17 Globemaster III transport aircraft remains one of the company’s most profitable assets. Moreover, the gigantic aircraft remains the backbone of the US Air Force’s strategic heavy-lift capability and is indispensible for America’s and NATO’s operations currently led across the globe. As defpro.com reported yesterday, Boeing has received a $1.15 billion modified contract for the C-17 sustainment partnership fiscal year 2009 (see defence.professionals | defpro.com). Within a large range of services, the Long Beach-based company will further ensure programme management as well as material and equipment management and will provide engine management and long term sustainment planning. The contract comprises the support of the US Air Force (USAF) as well as of Foreign Military Sale (FMS) operators of the C-17.

    The aircraft which has been developed during the 1980s and early 1990s and joined the Air Mobility Command (AMC) of the USAF in 1993, has since been sold and leased to a number of US allies, such as the UK (5), Australia (4) and Canada (4). With the C-17, the British Royal Air Force is the only European force which can at present provide heavy air-transportation from within its own inventory. Since first deliveries had been made to the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) in late 2006, the C-17 has also proven to be of great assistance to Australia in deploying and supporting troops as well as providing humanitarian support to Papua New Guinea (2007) and Burma (2008).

    To depict the C-17’s transport capacity the Royal Australian Air Force explains on its homepage that the Globemaster is large enough to transport the M1A1 Abrams main battle tank, Black Hawk, Seahawk or Chinook helicopters, three Tiger armed reconnaissance helicopters or five Bushmaster infantry vehicles. It has three times the carrying capacity of the C-130 Hercules. Compared to the 45 tons cargo capacity of the Il-76 – one of the major airlift platforms for the current supply of NATO forces in Afghanistan – the C-17 rather play’s in another league being able to transport up to 70 tons.


    The C-17 in the skies of the Persian Gulf

    In addition to the above named customers as well as of the NATO Strategic Airlift Capability Programme detailed below, Boeing’s Globemaster will now take to the skies of the Persian Gulf. Both the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Qatar have signed FMS contracts with the United States for the procurement of C-17s, respectively in mid 2008 and early 2009. After the Qatar Emiri Air Force has received its first C-17 this month, the UAE are still waiting for the delivery of their first aircraft. During this year’s International Defence Exhibition & Conference (IDEX) in Abu Dhabi, the UAE has signed deals worth $3 billion to purchase twelve C-130Js and four C-17s, becoming the sixth international customer for this aircraft type. Qatar bought two Globemasters and is now anticipating the delivery of the second aircraft by late 2009.

    "Qatar's selection of the C-17 reflects the strong international interest we continue to see in this advanced airlifter – especially in the Middle East, where it brings unparalleled capabilities for military, humanitarian and disaster-relief missions," said Tommy Dunehew, Boeing Global Mobility Systems vice president of Business Development, during the hand-over ceremony for the first C-17 of the Middle East country. According to media reports, Boeing has also identified India, Japan, the Netherlands and Singapore as potential future buyers. In June India has shortlisted the C-17 as its new Very Heavy Lift Transport Aircraft (VHTAC). The Indian Air Force (IAF) is looking at acquiring ten C-17s through the US government’s Foreign Military Sales framework. First aircraft are expected to be delivered three years after a contract is signed, according to Indian officials.


    A further key asset for NATO’s logistic capabilities

    During the past few weeks the C-17 has not only made news with deals and deliveries, but has furthermore gained a new reference for its ability to meet complex airlift requirements in a multi-national framework. This framework has been dubbed Strategic Airlift Capability (SAC) Programme and includes the NATO member nations Bulgaria, Estonia, Hungary, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Romania, Slovenia and the United States, as well as Partnership for Peace nations Finland and Sweden. After these countries jointly acquired three C-17s, in a 30-year programme somewhat similar to the NATO AWACS programme, the first aircraft has been delivered to the NATO Heavy Airlift Wing (HAW) at Pápa Air Base, Hungary, on 18 July by pilots from Norway, Sweden and the United States.

    "The HAW was created as an answer to help other nations meet global reach commitments," said Colonel John Zazworsky, HAW commander. "Airlift is very expensive and for some nations this provides an alternative to having to front that entire cost alone." The nations' varying investments, including a portion of the unit's 131 personnel, dictate their amount of annual flying hours. For example, Romania contributed funds toward the initial cost of purchasing the aircraft, and have eight personnel assigned to the unit in exchange for 200 flying hours. The NATO Airlift Management Agency (NAMA) will handle acquisition, logistics support and financial matters.

    SAC 01 has begun operational missions in support of the nations' requirements in early August and anticipates flying roughly 630 hours before the end of 2009 and more than 3,100 flying hours in 2010, all of which will be flown by multi-national aircrews regardless of the nation to which the mission belongs.


    Keeping the production running

    And in addition to the above success stories, the US Air Force had ordered a further 15 C-17 Globemaster IIIs worth some $2.95 billion back in February, keeping alive the production of the aircraft, which had been on the verge of closing down as orders had significantly been reduced before. The US Air Force will operate a total of 186 C-17s when delivery of all ordered aircraft have been completed and has thereby demonstrated its further commitment to this platform.

    Keeping the production line open was of paramount importance to Boeing in that the uncertain status of the European heavy airlift capabilities is not resolved and the Globemaster III virtually being the only alternative to the Il-76 so far leased by NATO members for their support of military operations abroad.

    The recent export success of the aircraft, even though still small in numbers, and the potential for further contracts to be signed in Asia as well as perhaps due to a growing NATO requirement should enable Boeing to keep production and services for the aircraft on a profitable level.


    Key specifications

    ? Crew: 3 (2 pilots, 1 loadmaster)
    ? Length: 53 m (174 ft)
    ? Wingspan: 51.75 m (169.8 ft)
    ? Height: 16.8 m (55.1 ft)
    ? Wing area: 353 m² (3,800 ft²)
    ? Engines: 4x Pratt & Whitney F117-PW-100 turbofans, 180 kN each
    ? Payload: 170,900 lb (77 tons)

    Performance:
    ? Cruise speed: Mach 0.76 (450 knots, 830 km/h)
    ? Range: 2,420 nm (4,482 km)
    ? Service ceiling: 45,000 ft (13,716 m)
     
  20. AJSINGH

    AJSINGH Senior Member Senior Member

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    Indian Air Force is one of the oldest air force in the world founded in 1931 with just four biplanes and five indian pilots...now it has one of the most advance 4++ generation combat aircraft ( sukhoi 30Mki) and Mig 29 and Mirage 2000 for bombing missions,but today it faces with fast depleation in its tactical forces due to the phasing out old mig 21 and and Mig 23 and also late induction of LCA....hence we urgently need to buy new combat aircraft for maintaing our military supeority in the south asian region ...hence the MMRCA competition has started in 2007 but it will not be before 2017 that our desired combat strength will be 39 squdrons.I think we should have 60 squadrons for military superiority...230 Sukhoi 30MKI will be for the offensive puropose ,around 120 LCA for point defence,Mig 21 for bomber escort mission ,150 odd Mirage for bombing missions,20 IAI Falcon for electronic warfare and more air to air refulers ,around 10 tactical squadron of PAK FAGA ..and Mig 29 for other missions such as recon ,not forgetting more Mi 35 for gorund support although i feel its the army avaition core which should take that responsibility....as for the MMRCA cmpetition ,we should buy 200 aircraft ...Mig 35 is best suited for it with excellent price for 4++ aircraft and full TOT ,and advance avonics and new Russian ASEA radar ..it is far better than the american and european counterparts plus IAF already has very simillar Mig 29 so it will be easy for IAF to train pilots and does not have to invest in new infrastructure.Also IAF should not forget the need of UAV ..it should invest in Mig Skat and but more Isralie UAV ...as for SAM ,IAF should induct SA 21 which is best SAM defence system.
     
  21. SATISH

    SATISH DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

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    Well I would not suggest the MiG-35 for the MMRCA. There are too many Russian platforms already in our Air force. Thus when the MiG 35 wins we will be an all Russian air force. This will give Russia the strategic leverage. India, a growing power in the region cannot allow another country to dictate terms to it. So the MiG 35 is a strict no-no. And the MiG 35 is another souped up MiG 29.

    The MiG 21s cannot be used as bomber escort as they are being used as the principle point defence. They also lack the range required for escort of bombers. The M-MRCA will be the principle bomb delivery system in the IAF for the near future. The Mirage 2000s which are upgraded to the 2005 standards will be the major multirole aircraft and will compliment the MMRCA winner. The SU 30MKI will be the Air Dominance fighter which will be flown for multi-role purposes.

    The PAK-FA will compliment the MiG 29SMT in Air superiority. The DARIN 3 upgraded Jaguars might be used for close air support along with the MiG 27 DARIN 2 upgrades. The LCA will be the main interceptor with secondary ground attack role.

    The C-17 will be the heavy lift transport along with the IL 76 which will form the lo end of heavy-lift. The AN-32 will be replaced by the MTA co-developed by Russia and India. The C 130J will be for special ops team only.

    The Indian LCH will be the mainstay of the combat helicopter division of the Air force being supplemented by the Mi 35. I prefer the KA 52 for this as it is a beast of a machine. The Mi 28N is as good as the Apache. But Ka 52 with its Co-axial rotor is far more agile.
     

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