Indian Air Force Maintaining strategic equilibrium

Discussion in 'Indian Air Force' started by Neil, Jul 1, 2011.

  1. Neil

    Neil Senior Member Senior Member

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    Indian Air Force faces two possible threats in the future in the form of Pakistan Air Force in the North West and the People’s Liberation Army Air Force breathing down its neck at the nation’s North Eastern boundary. PAF although a significantly smaller threat when compared to PLAAF is nevertheless a threat. PLAAF on the other hand enjoys numerical superiority which will soon tip the balance to technological and numerical superiority with the completion of the currently developing J-20, the Chinese fifth generation air superiority fighter.

    So the obvious question now is “How will Indian Air Force maintain equilibrium?”

    The answer is quiet simple but it involves a lot of planning and development and not to put aside the amount of money involved to keep things balanced. Regardless of all the hype and noise the fact is that the PLAAF majorly consists of third generation vintage aircrafts which are obsolete in design and capabilities. Putting that aside they do have some really good equipment namely:-
    Chengdu –J10 (a newer version J-10B is currently under flight testing)

    Su-30MKK
    Su-27

    The rest are either vintage or simply a copy of the above two Sukhoi aircrafts. For example the J-11B is an outright copy of the Su-27 which is nothing short of daylight robbery.

    To meet these threats IAF currently works on acquiring and gaining experience and knowledge on the fifth generation Russian stealth fighter the PAK FA. India plans on acquiring 200 of these fifth generation fighter jets. Out of the 200 50 will be single seaters and the rest will be two seaters. A naval version of the PAK FA is also on the cards.

    Next in the line is the MMRCA deal (Medium Multi Role Combat Aircraft). The deal currently is valued at 12 billion US $ and as of now both the Euro Fighter Typhoon and the Dassault Rafale have been shortlisted by the IAF. Both these aircrafts have amazing flight characteristics and capabilities. They have also had a fair share of action in both Libya and Afghanistan. The winner will be awarded with a deal for 126 aircrafts initially with the expansion to a total of 200 fighters.

    IAF already operates top of the line 4.5th generation fighters namely the Su-30MKI which are evidently a lot different from their Chinese counterparts, the current strength remains at 142 which will gradually become 272 of which 40 will be upgraded to carry the Brahmos supersonic cruise missiles. However all the Su-30MKI’s will be upgraded with the latest development in ECM suite and the proposed Zhuk-AE AESA radars giving it a sharp and definite edge over the PLAAF’s Su-30MKK’s.

    Currently the MiG-29’s in the IAF are also being upgraded to the MiG-29UPG standard giving them a new lease of life and capabilities which include much more efficiency and effectiveness.
    Dassault Mirage 2000’s currently fills the primary multirole fighter category which will be later replenished later on by the MRCA’s and the AMCA’s.

    MiG-21’s serve the role of interceptors a total of 200 from which 121 have been upgraded to the bison standards further increasing their life span however all of them will be soon replaced by the HAL Tejas (LCA).
    SEPECAT Jaguars and the MiG-27 full fills role of strike attack and support aircrafts IAF operates 139 Jaguars and about a 100 MiG-27’s. Let’s keep in mind that these aircrafts are still in service in a number of other air forces too. But however these too will be later on replaced by the AMCA (Advanced Medium Combat Aircraft) which itself is a 5th generation fighter.

    An interesting upgrade is the development of the K-100 Novator AAM which are usually termed as the “AWACS killer” due to its range of up to 200kms. These missiles will be mated with the Su-30MKI platform which gives the IAF a decisive edge from the PLAAF since AWACS platforms will be in jeopardy with the induction of this missile into service.

    So from my point of view PLAAF doesn’t really have any clear advantage over the IAF in the near future if all the pieces of the puzzle fit together it might even get outgunned by the Indian Air Force.



    Indian Air Force Maintaining strategic equilibrium | Defence Aviation
     
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  3. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    IAF needs more LCA mk2 . PLAAF got a lot more old aircrafts . Now they are trying to make all 4th Gen a/c airfroce .
     
  4. agentperry

    agentperry Senior Member Senior Member

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    IAF needs more SAMs to deal with numerical superiority of PLAAF, Mount everst and other himalayan ranges will make PLA cross them thru helis or cargo crafts like ILs, they can be bought down provided we have good radars and SAMs, BMDs are equally essential. once PLA, PLAAF loses a significant amount of men and equipment they will loses moral and enthu of fightin a war and get on table.
     
  5. p2prada

    p2prada Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    The article misses mentioning about J-20 and possibly the J-XX.
     
  6. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    @ P2PRADA ,
    If you do not mind please guide me the difference between J-20 and J-XX .
    I am in impression that J-20 is a prototype and in future that will be J-XX .
    Regards.
     
  7. pi314159

    pi314159 Guest

    Isn't Roman number XX equal to Arabic number 20? :)
     
  8. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    this could be or may not be 20....
     
  9. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    Thank you .
     
  10. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    Multi-role Combat Aircraft Programs PLAAF :

    Sukhoi Su-30MKK
    The purchase of the Sukhoi Su-30MKK (Mnogafunctunali Kommercial Kitayski—Multifunctional Commercial for China) marks perhaps the single most important increase in PLAAF combat capability since PLAAF modernization began in earnest in the 1990s. When outfitted with its new Phazotron ZHUK M-E radar, the Su-30MKK will be the most potent multi-role fighter in the PLAAF, or for that matter, on the Taiwan Strait. In the Su-30MKK the PLAAF will have a platform that will be better equipped for air superiority missions than its Su-27SK fighters. But more importantly, the Su-30MKK will be the first PLAAF combat aircraft able to deliver precision guided bombs and missiles, plus anti-radar and anti-ship missiles, in all weather conditions.

    A development of the Su-27UBK twin-seat trainer, the Sukhoi Su-30MK twin-seat strike fighter made its debut in 1993. [12] The Su-30MK contains two sets of weapon and flight controls that allow either crew member to fly or guide weapons, though the rear position is designed for a Weapons Systems Officer. Both cockpits are dominated by two large multi-function displays and the pilot can also utilize a helmet-mounted sight.

    This type became the basis for an Indian purchase of 40 Su-30K/MK/MKI fighters in 1996. The Su-30MKK prototype first flew on March 9, 1999. Through 1999 and 2000 data released mainly from Russian sources indicated that the PLAAF Su-30s would differ from India’s order for Su-30MKIs in several respects. First the PLAAF fighters would not be as sophisticated as their Indian counterparts, lacking the super-maneuverable additions like thrust-vectored engines and forward canards. In addition, the PLAAF fighters would not incorporate an advanced phased-array radar that Russia was developing, or Western avionics, that were being requested by the Indians.

    The initial 20 Su-30MKKs to be delivered will have the NIIP N001VE pulse-Doppler radar with a 80-100km range that can track up to 10 targets. [13] However, PLA Su-30MKKs will then be equipped with the much-improved Phazotron ZHUK-M-S. [14] The ZHUK-M-S has a 150km range in the air-to-air mode and can track 20 targets while attacking up to four. But its real improvement is in the air-to-ground mode, in which it can detect a destroyer at 300km, a railway bridge at 150km, and a group of moving tanks at 25km. [15] The Su-30MKK already has an integral Infrared Scan and Track system designed for air-to-air engagements, and would likely use instrument pods for low-light and laser designation for laser-guided bombs.

    The Su-30MKK has 12 weapons pylons,10 of which can carry guided missiles to include: the mile range Kh-59M TV-guided missile; the 125 mile range Kh-31P anti-radar missile; the Kh-29T TV-guided missile; and a range of laser and TV-guided bombs. It can also carry the existing range of Russian AAMs to include the helmet-sighted Vympel R-73, the medium range semi-active radar guided R-27 and the medium-range active radar guided Vympel R-77. At the 2001 Moscow Airshow the Raduga bureau revealed its Kh-59MK radar-guided anti-ship missile. Its 285km range correlates with the search range of the ZHUK-M-S radar, and opens the possibility that PLAAF Su-30MKKs may in the future have a significant anti-naval mission.

    While not as important as its systems and munitions, the respectable aerial performance of the Su-30MKK should not be forgotten. At low fuel states it should have the formidable maneuverability of the Su-27, the effect of which is enhanced by its helmet-sighted short-range AAMs. In close-in combat the Su-30MKK should be able to dominate older Northrop F-5Es and Lockheed-Martin F-16s not equipped with helmet-sighted missiles—which includes almost all the inventories for these types in Taiwan and in Southeast Asia. [16] As a strike fighter, the Su-30MKK will also have an impressive reach due to its aerial refueling capability. Its advertised unrefueled radius of 1,600km (960mi) extends to 2,600km (1,560mi) with one aerial refueling, and to 3,495km (2,095mi) with another. [17] Such reach will become possible when the PLAAF receives Ilyushin Il-78 MIDAS tankers expected to be delivered in 2002. [18]

    Reporting about the PLA’s purchase of the Su-30 first surfaced in 1997 in conjunction with the purchase of SOVREMENNIY destroyers. By August 1999 agreement had been reached that China would purchase its first batch. [19] At China’s request, the Russians agreed to produce the Su-30MKK in the Komsomolsk na Amur Aircraft Production Organization (KnAAPO) plant in Western Russia, instead of the Irkusk Aircraft Production Organization (IAPO). This was a considerable blow to IAPO, which had previously had an arrangement with KnAPPO. The later would fill Su-27 orders while IAPO would fill Su-30 orders. China did not want Indians near their aircraft, and KnAAPO had already established a deep relationship with the PLAAF over Su-27SK and Su-27SK component production. In mid-1999 one Hong Kong report noted that co-production of 250 Su-30MKKs could follow the purchase of Russian built aircraft. [20] A more recent source report notes that Shenyang co-production may switch to Su-30MKKs after about 80 Su-27SKs are completed. [21] So far, between 10 and 20 Su-27s have been built in Shenyang.

    In December 2000 the first ten Su-30MKKs were delivered to the PLAAF. It is possible that this first batch was stationed at Wuhu Air Base, which also hosts a Su-27SK unit. A second batch of about 10 were delivered in August 2001. The remaining 18 of the first Su-30MKK order will reportedly be delivered by the end of 2001. The PLA was likely so pleased with the Su-30MKK that in conjunction with the Jiang-Putin summit this past July, it ordered a second batch of 38-40. These are to be delivered by the end of 2003. And there are already reports that China may seek a third batch of 20 fighters, for a projected initial total of 100 KnAAPO-built Su-30MKKs. [22] Given the PLAAF’s doctrinal emphasis on obtaining multi-role fighters, plus the difficulties that have plagued Shenyang’s co-production efforts, and the superior performance of the Su-30MKK, there remains a strong possibility that the PLA will order more Su-30MKKs from KnAAPO.

    http://http://www.strategycenter.net/research/pubID.8/pub_detail.asp
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2011
  11. p2prada

    p2prada Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Both are different. One is being built by SAC while the other is being built by CAC.
     
  12. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    Multirple Aircraft Program PLAAF :
    Chengdu J-10
    The J-10 is shaping up to be the second most important multi-role PLAAF fighter performance-wise, but apparently may become the most important in terms of numbers. Long the object of Western derision, as well as intense speculation, due to its 20+ year development program, perhaps five or more J-10s are now flying in a test and evaluation program. The J-10 is expected to enter production and up to 30 could be built by 2005. [23] According to another estimate eventual production could reach 500. [24] In terms of performance, the J-10 is compared by some to the F-16 Block 30, [25] which was the first F-16 to incorporate AIM-120 active radar guided AAMs.

    The J-10’s origin’s can be traced back to the J-9 program which began at Shenyang in the early 1960s. Intended to respond to the new threat of the U.S. McDonnell-Douglas F-4 PHANTOM, the J-9 was first proposed as a tail-less delta wing design. The program was shifted to the Chengdu Aircraft Factory and by the early 1970s redesigned the J-9 as a 13 ton Mach 2.5, canard-delta design, very similar to the Swedish Saab J-37 VIGGEN. The J-9 program was discontinued in 1980 but its basic canard configuration persisted in the later J-10 proposal. [26] The J-10 was by this time the PLA’s response to emerging Soviet 4th generation fighter threats.

    By the end of the 1980s, having been denied U.S. funding for their LAVI fighter program, Israel exported its LAVI technology to the PRC. There are some unconfirmed rumors that Israel even sold a complete LAVI prototype, with its U.S. F-100 turbofan engine, to the PRC. There is one unconfirmed report that a J-10 prototype completed in 1993 was practically a copy of the LAVI, with the F-100 engine. [27] This would conform to the famous model of the J-10 with Li Peng. At any rate, it is widely reported that the J-10 has benefited from both Israeli and Russian design input, with Israel providing critical fly-by-wire technology and advanced cockpit instrumentation.

    In two ways the J-10 could have possibly benefited from U.S. technology. First, the Israeli LAVI was greatly influence by access to General Dynamics F-16 technology. Some of this knowledge was passed on to Chengdu by Israel. Such technology may have included avionics, advanced composite materials and flight control specification. [28] Fly-by-wire technology may have been shared as well. Also, the J-10 is said by Taiwan sources to have benefited from PLA access to Pakistan’s F-16 fighters. Such access would presumably include inspection of the aircraft as well as flight evaluation against PLAAF fighters.

    If the “Li Peng” model does represent an early design configuration (or even the first prototype), then the J-10 was severely redesigned by the late 1990s. This redesign reflected the requirement to use a 27,500lb-thrust Russian Saturn-Aluyka AL-31 engine, and the doctrinal requirements to have an attack capability. Another report notes that the PLA is developing a 26,700lb-thrust engine but has experienced difficulties in completing this engine. [29] The availability of a suitable domestic engine will likely be critical to the J-10’s success in export markets.

    The long-awaited revelation of the J-10 did not occur in an official sense, but through leaks of pictures over the Internet in early 2001. These pictures show a side view of the J-10 on the ground and several pictures show the J-10 in flight. [30] They reveal a F-16 size canard fighter with a square engine inlet, vs. the round inlet on the “Li Peng” model/Lavi/F-16. And compared to the Li Peng model, the true J-10’s vertical stabilizer and main wing are also larger.

    The canard configuration confers good short take-off capability and good maneuverability, which are useful in interception and air combat missions. According to Chinese Internet sources, the J-10 cockpit will feature three multi-function displays, a large head-up display (HUD) and hands-on-throttle-and-stick (HOTAS) capability. Reported radar possibilities include the Russian Phazotron ZHUK ZEMCHUG (Pearl); ZHUK PD; Phazotron SOKOL phased array radar, and the Israeli Elta EL-2032. The ZEMCHUG is the most likely candidate radar for the J-10, and is said to be derived from the ZHUK-M sold to the PLAAF to modify the J-8II fighter. [31] These radar would have the capability for multiple track and attack, and for ground attack. The J-10 is also expected to benefit from an indigenous helmet sighting system, perhaps similar to that revealed at the 2000 Zhuhai Airshow.

    Such a sight will likely be able to guide Russian Vympel R-73, Israeli Python-4 or perhaps and indigenous HMS guided AAM like the PL-9. Long-range missile options might include the Russian R-27 and R-77 or a new indigenous active-guided medium range AAM derived from the AMR-1 program. Other reports point to the possibility that the J-10 could have up to 11 hardpoints for carrying ordinance. [32] Each wing is thought to have three hardpoints, one for a fuel tank, and the fuselage has five hardpoints. This configuration would allow the J-10 to carry a low light/laser designator pod on a forward fuselage hardpoint, indicating that the J-10 could have a PGM capability. Attack missiles might eventually include the C-801/802/701 or variants of these missiles. Supersonic attack missiles might include the Russian Kh-31 or a new ramjet-powered Chinese attack missile revealed at the 2001 Zhuhai show.

    In 1997 ONI projected that for naval operations, the J-10 could be modified for twin-engines or an upgraded engine. [33] Some speculation holds that the twin-engine version might be powered by the Russian Klimov RD-33 with 18,300lbs. of thrust with afterburner, for a total of 36,600lbs thrust available power. Another alternative might be to use upgraded AL-31 revealed at the 2001 Moscow Airshow. This engine will produce 34,000-36,000lbs. of thrust in the afterburner. [34] With either the twin RD-33s or an upgraded AL-31, the J-10 might also be developed into a twin-seat attack variant. The PLAAF could opt for such a J-10 if it decides to follow the experience of other air forces that have concluded that two crew members are optimal for multi-role missions.

    Despite its long development period, it appears that the J-10’s future in the PLAAF is becoming more secure. At this year’s Paris Airshow it was revealed that China might purchase up to 300 more AL-31 engines especially modified for the J-10. [35] This would indicate that the PLA has lost its patience in waiting for a suitable domestic engine and that a high priority has been placed on moving the J-10 into production. Future versions could feature thrust-vectoring and stealth enhancements.

    http://http://www.strategycenter.net/research/pubID.8/pub_detail.asp
     
  13. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    Multirole Aircraft Program PLAAF :
    Shenyang J-8II
    The PLAAF’s new zeal for multi-role aircraft is also extending to the venerable Shenyang J-8II. Though an obsolete fighter that would be better replaced with Sukhois or the J-10, it is very likely that its one major advantage—availability—has deemed it worthy of a multi-role upgrade. It is possible that up to 100 multi-role capable J-8IIs will be acquired by the PLAAF. That the PLA is again investing its scarce resources in the J-8II is an important indication that increasing the numbers of multi-role fighters may be as important as introducing more modern systems.

    Shenyang J-8IIs have been improved incrementally since their introduction. The first major effort to improve the fighter was the “Peace Pearl” program led by Grumman in the late 1980s which sought to outfit the fighter with a variant of the APG-66 radar used in the F-16. When this was ended as part of U.S. Tiananmen massacre sanctions the PLA turned to Russia. In 1996 the J-8IIM emerged, modified to carry the Phazotron ZHUK-8II multi-mode radar and Russian R-27 semi-active medium range AAMs. Pitched as an export only program, the J-8IIM had no takers.

    However, by early 2001 reports surfaced that the PLAAF was indeed proceeding with a multi-role capable version of the J-8II. This new version is variously referred to as the J-8IIC or the J-8IIH. [36]

    It will carry a Russian radar and a more powerful Wopen WP-14 engine. At the Paris Airshow it was disclosed that the PLA would purchase up to 100 new Phazotron ZHUK radar to modify the J-8II. This was confirmed to the author at the 2001 Moscow Airshow. The radar will be the same ZHUK-8II developed for the J-8IIM. This radar will be able to cue R-27 class AAMs and direct anti-ship missiles like the C-801/802. It is possible that the J-8IIC/H could also carry the new Chinese supersonic ASM.

    Other sources note that the J-8IIC/H will be a development of the J-8IID, which is carries a fixed aerial refueling probe. [37] At the 1998 Zhuhai Airshow a prominent picture showed a J-8II with a low light/laser targeting pod similar in configuration to the Israeli LITENING laser/low-light pod. This could indicate that the J-8IIC/H may be able to carry laser-guided bombs. At the 2000 Zhuhai Airshow, officials from the China Jinan Aviation Central Factory noted that J-8IIs were also being equipped with their new FK-2 data link system to improve communication. It is likely the FK-2 data link would used on the J-8IIC/H.

    While the J-8IIC/H may always be less capable than U.S. fighters like the F-16 and F/A-18, it is being turned into a formidable weapon system when armed with stand-off missiles and employed for offensive attack missions. In an air-to-air role, the J-8IIC/H might also be valuable as a long-range escort for attack-dedicated Su-30MKKs or JH-7s. The J-8IIC/Hs might draw off the CAP for a U.S. carrier that would allow a strike force to better get close enough for an attack.

    http://http://www.strategycenter.net/research/pubID.8/pub_detail.asp
     
  14. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    Future combat aircraft -PLAAF :
    Since the late 1990s there has been speculation about the PLA’s next-generation combat aircraft, referred to by the U.S. Office of Naval Intelligence in 1997 as the “XXJ. ”In its Worldwide Challenges to Naval Strike Warfare publication it estimated an IOC of 2015 for the XXJ, which would be “a large multi-role fighter with an emphasis on air combat and a reduced radar signature design.” [48] ONI’s projected design resembled a U.S. Boeing F-15 EAGLE fighter.

    In the last several months, however, a number of alleged future PLAAF fighter designs have appeared on Chinese Web sites which show more designs may also be considered. One design from what looks to be a wind tunnel test model closely resembles the U.S. F-22. Another design also resembles the F-22 but uses canards in addition to horizontal stabilizers, like Su-37. [49] Both designs make healthy use of stealth shaping, and very likely, thrust-vectored engines. Another source calls the later configuration the “New 93” and notes that it is a 15-ton fighter with a warload of 4,860kg, and a performance that exceeds the Su-27 in many respects except range. [50]

    The canard design could indicate that some Russian assistance is already present in the XXJ. Russia, however, is seeking the partnership investments of India and China for its next generation fighter, slated to compete with the Lockheed-Martin F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. However, it is unclear that Russia will succeed in organizing an effective 5th generation fighter program among its many competing aircraft factions, much less pay for it.

    http://http://www.strategycenter.net/research/pubID.8/pub_detail.asp
     
  15. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    Thank you.
     
  16. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    As per wiki ,
    At least 200 kms. , ( possibly 300-400 kms. / 160-210 nmi .)
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2011

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