India, US to share terror database

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by RAM, Jul 24, 2010.

  1. RAM

    RAM The southern Man Senior Member

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    NEW DELHI: Institutionalising the sharing of intelligence and terror databases between India and US, the countries on Friday signed the Indo-US Counter-Terrorism Initiative. The pact comes about seven months after Prime Minister Manmohan Singh initiated the process during his US visit.

    The initiative, which provides the legal framework for setting up joint working groups on matters relating to terrorism and security, was signed by Union home secretary G K Pillai and US ambassador to India Mr Timothy J Roemer. Foreign secretary Nirupama Rao was also present on the occasion.

    Though India and US had been informally sharing information on terror-related matters all this while, the new pact will pave the way for formalisation of a system for such cooperation. Under the new arrangement, India and US can set up joint working groups on matters such as coastal and maritime security, terror financing and money laundering, cyber and border security and investigation of terror attacks.

    India will now be able to set up dedicated hotlines to share terror updates and pose terror-related queries to their US counterparts. Also they can now link up to rich terror databases of the US agencies to help in intelligence gathering and investigations. The agreement will also pave the way for leading high-tech security equipment manufacturers to approach India for supplying the same.

    According to Union home secretary G K Pillai, several areas for Indo-US counter-terror cooperation, beyond the existing instrumentalities, were identified during home minister P Chidambaram’s visit to the US in September 29. These areas are fully reflected in the agreed document, he said. Describing the MoU as an evidence of successful cooperation between India and US in counter-terrorism matters, Mr Pillai said it was based upon the solid foundation of mutual benefit.

    Mr Roemer too endorsed this view, saying “today, with the formal signing of the initiative, we take several significant steps forward against terrorism.”

    Terming the pact as symbolic of the “indispensable partnership” against terrorism, the envoy said both the countries would work closely in matters like intelligence sharing and probe into bomb blasts.

    “In the coming days and months there will be even closer information sharing and collaborative efforts on issues ranging from bomb blast probe and major event security to mega-city policing, cyber and border security,” he said.

    Stating that the initiative would enable India and US to fight terrorism together on a global basis, Mr Roemer said it symbolised Prime Minister Singh’s and President Obama’s efforts “to create this indispensable partnership for the 21 century.” Incidentally, the treaty is part of the paperwork to be finalised ahead of Mr Obama’s visit to India later this year.

    According to an MHA release, the Indo-US terror cooperation initiative provides for strengthening capabilities to effectively combat terrorism, promotion of exchanges regarding modernisation of techniques; sharing of best practices on issues of mutual interest and development of investigative skills and promotion of cooperation in forensic science laboratories. Besides, it seeks to establish procedures to provide mutual investigative assistance, enhance capabilities to act against money laundering, counterfeit currency and financing of terrorism, exchange best practices on mass transit and rail security and increase exchanges between Coast Guards and Navy on maritime security.

    Exchanging experience and expertise on port and border security, enhancing liaison and training between specialist counter terrorism units including NSG and their US counterparts are part of the agreement.

    http://economictimes.indiatimes.com...share-terror-database/articleshow/6207848.cms
     
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  3. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Whats the use of all this dog 'n' pony show by usa when it itself protects the perpetrators.USA is the most perfidious country on earth.
     
  4. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Smoke signals from US


    The Pioneer Edit Desk

    No reason for India to feel reassured

    There have been interesting developments in US-Pakistan relations over the past few days that indicate a further churning of policy in Washington, DC. The US Secretary of State, Ms Hillary Clinton, during her recent visit to Islamabad for the so-called US-Pakistan strategic dialogue, did not mince words while making it abundantly clear that America believes a section of the Pakistani establishment is sheltering Osama bin Laden and other Al Qaeda terrorists. She then told BBC in an interview that the consequences of a terrorist attack on America emanating from Pakistan would be “devastating”, reviving memories of Gen Pervez Musharraf being threatened with his country being “bombed back to the Stone Age” by Mr Richard Armitage, the tough-talking Deputy Secretary of State of the Bush Administration. On the eve of Ms Clinton's visit, US Special Representative for AfPak Affairs Richard Holbrooke said at a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing that Pakistan remains the epicentre of terrorism and went on to explain how the country has become a seething mass of jihadis on the rampage. Now we have the US imposing sanctions on the Haqqani network and key members of this faction of the Taliban, as demanded by Gen David Petraeus, who has replaced Gen Stanley McChrystal (he had to resign following the furore over his description of the Obama Administration as a bunch of “wimps”) as the top commander of American forces in Afghanistan. By itself this would not have meant much, but the sanctions are noteworthy because the Pakistani establishment, more specifically the Army led by Gen Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, has been trying to cut a deal with the Haqqani network to become Islamabad’s proxy in Kabul after the exit of American troops in the summer of 2011. Pakistan’s ‘good’ Taliban, it appears, do not find favour with the Americans. More important, Gen Petraeus has shown (contrary to expectations in the barracks of Rawalpindi) that he is no pushover and will fight the war in Afghanistan his way, as he did in Iraq. Add to this the possibility of a rethink on the pullout of American troops — Ms Clinton indicated that the US soldiers won’t just pack-up and leave — and the possibility of yet another AfPak policy emerging from Washington cannot be ruled out entirely.

    Yet, irrespective of whether or not the Obama Administration recalibrates its AfPak policy, the fact remains that Pakistan is not necessarily impressed by either harsh words or tough action. Instead, it persists with its policy of propping up the Army as the main front of the Government: Nothing else explains why Gen Kayani should have got a three-year extension, his second, courtesy a Prime Minister eager to oblige the men in khaki. An extension for Gen Kayani, who once famously described the Pakistani Army as “India-centric”, also means an extension for Gen Shuja Pasha, the ISI chief, who has been plotting cross-border terror attacks with deadly results. Curiously, Ms Clinton called on Gen Kayani — a departure from protocol — and later the Army spokesman said they discussed “issues of mutual interest”. Was the extension discussed during the meeting? Which brings us to the question: Is the Obama Administration playing a devious game, pretending to be tough on terror while collaborating with the primary patron of terrorists? For all we know, the statements and sanctions could be meant to create an elaborate smokescreen meant to mislead India. It wouldn’t be the first time either.
     

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