India turned its back on Canada during bid for Security Council seat

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Miriachi, Oct 20, 2011.

  1. Miriachi

    Miriachi Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2011
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    11
    [​IMG]
    Enlarge this image

    [h=2]India turned its back on Canada during bid for Security Council seat[/h] [h=4]john ibbitson AND steven chase [/h] [h=5]Ottawa— From Thursday's Globe and Mail[/h] [h=5]Published Thursday, Oct. 14, 2010 3:00AM EDT[/h] [h=5]Last updated Thursday, Oct. 14, 2010 9:58AM EDT[/h]
    646 comments

    When the time came for Canada to count its friends in its bid for a seat at the United Nations Security Council, India wasn’t there.
    Those with a close knowledge of how nations voted in the General Assembly say India supported Portugal over Canada in the contest for a temporary seat on the council this week. That vote stings: Prime Minister Stephen Harper has invested a great deal of political capital in improving Indo-Canadian ties. In this instance, at least, his efforts were for naught.

    There were good reasons for Canada to hope for India’s support. The subcontinent is the second largest source of immigrants to Canada, which has a large Indian diaspora.
    Mr. Harper visited India last November, and the two nations signed a nuclear energy co-operation agreement earlier this year. The Conservatives have identified its fellow Commonwealth member as a key market, as Canada seeks to pivot from the Atlantic to the Pacific in search of new, emerging markets for its resources and manufactured goods.
    But India supported Portugal nonetheless.
    The reason is simple: India’s most important priority at the UN is to be asked to join the Security Council as a permanent member. Portugal supports that campaign.
    Canada opposes expanding the number of permanent members, any one of whom can veto a resolution. Instead, it supports an expanded and regionally representative group of non-permanent members on the council.
    Shashishekhar Gavai, India’s High Commissioner to Canada, refused to comment on how India voted, pointing out that the member nations cast a secret ballot. However, he said Canadians should not become preoccupied with the loss of face associated with the defeat, pointing out that India lost a similar contest in 1996.
    “One has to move on. It’s not really the end of the world,” Mr. Gavi said Wednesday in an interview. “Canada’s position does not stand diminished in any way.”
    But India was not the only Asian tiger to abandon Canada this week. Informed observers speaking on background said it was virtually certain that China voted for Portugal against Canada as well.
    Although Stephen Harper stood beside Chinese ambassador Lan Lijun Wednesday to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Canada’s diplomatic recognition of China, maintaining that “the strategic partnership between Canada and China has never been more promising,” in truth relations between the two countries until recently were strained, in part because of the Conservative government’s insistence on raising human-rights issues with China.
    Canada regularly votes with the United States on issues such as sanctions against Iran, where China would prefer not to interfere. Portugal is seen to be much less obstreperous on such issues.
    Wenran Jiang, chair of the University of Alberta's China Institute, said he believes China voted for Portugal on the second round because Beijing would feel its interests are more closely aligned with the European nation's. “I think on a number of issues China still perceives Canada to be very much on the side of the United States.”
    And in what has been described as a new Marshall Plan for Europe, Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao was in Greece last week, offering aid and promising to purchase bonds when that troubled nation next goes to market. Portugal’s economic straits are almost equally dire.
    Those close to the vote say Canada had 136 written commitments of support from nations at the General Assembly when voting began. But Canada received only 114 votes in the first round, and by round two, the count was down to 78, forcing Ambassador John McNee to withdraw Canada’s name.
    Despite appearing to not have a friend in the emerging-economy world, Conservatives and their supporters spoke defiantly on Wednesday about preferring to lose their bid for a seat than to make unsavoury deals to secure votes.
    “If the only way you could win it is to sacrifice your principles or relationships, then I think there are occasions when it's better to lose than to win that way,” said former Reform Party leader Preston Manning. “I don't think a seat on the Security Council at the UN, for example, is worth sacrificing some of Canada's current principles and commitments.”
    The fact remains, however, that Canada will not be present at one of the most interesting Security Councils in the UN’s history. Almost all of the major emerging economies – including India, Brazil, South Africa and permanent member China – will have representation on the council when it meets Jan. 1. How well the new powerhouses mesh with the old order could presage the level of global co-operation the world can look forward to over the coming years.

    India turned its back on Canada during bid for Security Council seat - The Globe and Mail
     
  2.  
  3. Miriachi

    Miriachi Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2011
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    11
    Canada’s hopes of returning to the top body of the United Nations ended in crushing disappointment Tuesday when it withdrew from contention, handing victory to Portugal.
    The defeat marks a significant embarrassment for Stephen Harper’s government. It is the first time in more than 50 years Canada has not won a campaign for a temporary seat on the Security Council.

    In Tuesday’s election, Portugal garnered 113 votes in the second round, less than two-thirds of the ballots cast, which is the hurdle for a win. Canada received just 78 votes. As a third round of voting commenced, Canada announced it would no longer seek the seat.
    Germany, heavily favoured ahead of the vote to secure a seat, won the other seat up for grabs in an earlier round of voting.
    Mr. Harper's office wasted little time assigning blame for the disappointment, placing it at the feet of Liberal Leader Michael Ignatieff.
    “I would say a big deciding factor was the fact that Canada's bid did not have unity because we had Mr. Ignatieff questioning and opposing Canada's bid,” Dimitri Soudas, Harper's communications director, told The Canadian Press.
    “That was a factor that played ultimately against Canada because people outside of Canada were saying, ‘Well, Germany and Portugal have a united front, their opposition and their governments seem to be fully, 100 per cent behind this bid.’
    “Canada did not have that required advantage. We had an Opposition Leader that opposed Canada and clearly was not in it for Canada on this one.”
    The results of Tuesday’s election, in a secret ballot cast by representatives of the UN’s 192 nations, mark a major setback for Canada’s international ambitions.
    Although ambivalent about the campaign earlier, the government switched gears and made it a priority. Ottawa had paid keen attention to the United Nations in recent weeks.
    The Prime Minister delivered two speeches there in September, the first at a development summit and the second at the organization’s opening debate. Foreign Minister Lawrence Cannon made several trips to New York to woo diplomats in person and attended Tuesday’s vote, saying earlier in the morning that he was “confident” of Canada’s chances.
    In its bid to win a seat, Canada worked to portray itself as a model global citizen, with a strong track record in peacekeeping missions, diplomatic work, and multilateral cooperation. But such campaigns are not won on international reputation alone – indeed, aggressive “vote swapping” is required in order to triumph, where countries trade support in the Security Council election for backing in other forums.
    Although Canada was favoured over Portugal heading into Tuesday’s vote, the election process is notoriously unpredictable. Nations have been known to promise their support to one candidate only to switch allegiance in the final vote. A former Australian ambassador to the UN called it the “rotten lying bastards” phenomenon after his country lost a bid for a seat on the Security Council.
    Tuesday’s drama began just before 10 o’clock ET, as diplomats started to gather in the main UN chamber. On their desks, they found small gifts as a last reminder from the hopeful candidates (Canada’s appeared to be a vial of maple syrup).
    The representatives were asked to remain seated as the paper ballots were distributed. Shortly afterward, six aides roamed the packed room, each accompanied by a diplomat, carrying boxes to collect the ballots. For one tense hour, the delegates circulated, making conversation as the votes were counted.
    At about 11:30, the results were announced, but neither Canada nor Portugal received the requisite number of votes in the first round. A tense second round followed, after which Canada withdrew. (India, South Africa and Colombia ran uncontested for the other three seats.)
    Some experts worried that Ottawa’s belated embrace of the campaign meant that Canada faced a tougher fight in the vote than it should have. The country has served six terms on the Security Council, the most recent in 1999-2000.
    Last week, the Harper government lashed out at critics of its campaign, particularly Mr. Ignatieff, who had questioned whether Canada deserved the seat in light of the country’s recent policies.
    The most exclusive club at the UN, the Security Council is the only body which has the right to impose its will on other members. Much of council’s work takes place in negotiations between its five permanent members – the United States, China, Russia, France and Britain – but the ten elected members are courted for their votes. Membership also would have provided a platform to focus diplomatic attention on issues that Canada deemed important.
     
  4. Miriachi

    Miriachi Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2011
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    11
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^I know its a year ago article...
     
  5. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2011
    Messages:
    14,140
    Likes Received:
    8,529
    Location:
    North Carolina, USA
    News to me. Does Portugal being broke affect its place on the Security Council?
     
  6. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2011
    Messages:
    7,308
    Likes Received:
    2,976
    No need for POrtugal to be financially sound to play its duties in the UNSC. Anyway, Uncle Sam is bankrolling most of the bills. :laugh:
     
  7. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Messages:
    24,274
    Likes Received:
    11,287
    Location:
    BANGalore
    Isnt this a really old news?
     
  8. The Messiah

    The Messiah Bow Before Me! Elite Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2010
    Messages:
    10,788
    Likes Received:
    4,552
    As if they lost from one vote :lol:

    They dont back us so we didn't back them, simples :)
     
    balai_c, debasree and maomao like this.
  9. panduranghari

    panduranghari Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2012
    Messages:
    1,790
    Likes Received:
    1,245
    UnCLE sAM IS broke too. He is just printing currency out of thin air. USA is the biggest debtor in the whole world.
     

Share This Page