India to deploy non-lethal arms on Bangladeshi border

Discussion in 'Internal Security' started by Rage, Mar 14, 2011.

  1. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    5,407
    Likes Received:
    968
    India to deploy non-lethal arms on Bangladeshi border


    March 12, 2011


    New Delhi: In cognizance of Bangladeshi Security's protesting against the killing of its nationals in firing by border troops, the India Border Security Force (BSF) said it will use non-lethal weapons against infiltrators along parts of the India-Bangladesh border on Thursday.

    Border Guards Bangladesh (BGB) Director General Major General Rafiqul Islam, in a joint press conference here with BSF Director General Raman Srivastava, told reporters that firing by the Indian border guards at "unarmed" civilians was resulting in their death and they requested the Indians to stop using lethal weapons.

    "It's the BSF which opens fire as a result of which Bangladesh's unarmed people are being killed. That is where our concerns lie," Rafiqul Islam said at the end of a five-day biannual border coordination conference here between the BGB and the BSF.

    "Every individual, by whichever name you call them... be it a smuggler, drug trafficker etc.... has a right to live till he or she is found guilty by the court of law. That's why we have been urging the Indian government and the BSF... please avoid firing that kills people. You arrest them for illegally crossing the border," he added.

    Srivastava said that the BSF was inducting non-lethal weapons, primarily to avoid casualties, in areas of the India-Bangladesh border where smuggling bids were made frequently.

    The non-lethal weapons would be in addition to the regular, standard weapons of the BSF, namely the INSAS rifles.

    "The non-lethal weapons, which we propose, will be in addition to the normal weaponry. There are certain areas along the India-Bangladesh border that are more vulnerable to smuggling. In some of those areas, we are introducing non-lethal weapons on an experimental basis, to see if we can reduce fatalities," said Srivastava.

    "Because, once we open fire, it is fatal... the man dies. We are trying non-lethal weapons so that at worst he (infiltrator) is injured and he can be apprehended. We have no desire to kill anybody," he notably added.

    The BSF director general said that at times, Indian troopers had to use the weapons in self-defence. "Even then, we do not want to kill them. We want to apprehend them. That is the reason we want to adopt non-lethal weapons," he added.

    Rafiqul Islam said violent incidents involving BSF and BGB personnel had stopped happening after May 2010 and there was far more understanding and mutual respect for each other now.

    The two forces also exchanged a list of criminals, insurgents and smugglers wanted for standing trial in each courts.

    "The policy of the Bangladeshi government is that our territory will not be allowed to be used by outfits against India, a friendly country of ours," Rafiqul Islam said. His statement was appreciated by Srivastava.

    Asked if the India-Bangladesh border in West Bengal and Assam will be sealed in view of the assembly elections in the two Indian states, Srivastava said the Election Commission has directed the same and it would be done.

    The BSF and the BGB agreed to organise the joint "retreat" ceremony at Petrapole/Benapole integrated check-post on the lines of the ceremony between the BSF and the Pakistan Rangers at Attari-Wagah border in Punjab.

    The Joint Retreat is a ceremony where national flags of the two countries would be lowered amidst playing of national anthems. The joint retreat ceremony is part of 'Confidence Building Measures'.

    During the five-day meeting, the two sides discussed issues relating to implementation of joint border management plan, trans-border crimes, firing on Indo-Bangladesh border, border fencing, smuggling of fake Indian currency notes, narcotics and phensidyl and trafficking of women and children.

    Security related issues, joint survey in adverse possession and head count in the enclaves and several confidence building measures also came up for discussion, a joint statement said.

    On the issue of the death of Bangladesh nationals, both sides agreed to take effective steps to reduce such incidents due to firing at the border. On security-related issues, both sides reiterated their commitment to continue active mutual cooperation, the statement said.

    Both border chiefs agreed to take all-out steps to prevent cross-border crimes, illegal border crossings, drugs and human trafficking.

    Ramaan Srivastava termed the just concluded Border Coordination Conference as the "best" meeting the BGB and the BSF "had ever had in the past." He said the decisions taken during the conference would have far reaching effects

    Major General Rafiqul Islam noted that they had "absolute understanding" and "we understand each other better than before." The two sides also agreed to increase field-level meetings and commanders to hold weekly meeting for more inter-action.

    During the conference, both sides also agreed to complete the joint inspection of the remaining twenty patches out of 46- unfenced priority patches proposed by India within 150 yards of Indian border.

    The BGB DG said during the conference Bangladesh had submitted a list of persons involved in drug business and names of criminals and anti-state elements to the BSF authority.

    The BSF chief also submitted a list of criminals who are involved in smuggling of fake Indian currency notes alleging that they have been operating from Bangladesh.

    During the meeting, the Indian side offered training facilities to Bangladesh. A team from Bangladesh is likely to visit Kolkata in this regard.

    The 20-member Bangladesh team left this afternoon for Kolkata from Dhaka.


    http://www.newstoday.com.bd/index.php?option=details&news_id=22440&date=2011-03-13
     
  2.  
  3. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    5,407
    Likes Received:
    968
    India and Bangladesh: Foes No More?

    Mar. 12, 2011

    [​IMG]
    A woman walks along the India-Bangladesh border in
    Assam. Illegal border crossings have been an issue
    between the two countries.


    India’s often-testy relations with Bangladesh appear to be improving, and a meeting of the nations’ top border officials this weekend shows the progress.

    A spate of killings by guards from India’s Border Security Force of Bangladeshis trying to cross the border illegally has stymied relations in the past.

    Human rights groups estimate BSF guards have killed over 500 people, including Indians, but mainly Bangladeshis involved in smuggling, in the past five years.

    Raman Srivastava, director general of the BSF, acknowledged the problem at the weekend meeting in New Delhi and promised that guards would pursue “non-lethal” methods of dealing with illegal border crossings.

    That’s a rare admission of guilt which is likely to play well in Bangladesh, where the public was angered in January by the killing of a 15-year-old girl by the BSF as she was trying to cross illegally back into Bangladesh for her wedding.

    Relations between the two countries have been steadily improving since Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina took office in 2009.

    Since then, Ms. Hasina has overseen a crackdown on Indian separatist groups from the northeast who have traditionally found shelter in Bangladesh – a major sticking point in relations for India. On Saturday, Mr. Srivastava handed over a list of insurgents that it believes are still on Bangladeshi soil and Dhaka promised action, including increased patrols on its side of the border.

    Prime Minister Manmohan Singh is planning a state visit to Bangladesh later this year after Ms. Hasina visited New Delhi in 2010, a trip which began the present thaw in ties.

    Indian officials view Ms. Hasina as easier to work with than the main opposition Bangladesh National Party, which is allied to Islamist groups.

    But there’s still a long way to go to restore normalcy in relations.

    Indian troops helped Bangladeshi separatists in a 1971 war against Pakistan’s army. Pakistan lost the war and the former East Pakistan province became the new nation of Bangladesh, headed by Ms. Hasina’s father, Sheikh Mujibur Rahman.

    But after the war, relations between Bangladesh and India became strained. Bangladesh is almost entirely surrounded by India, which in recent years has built a barbed-wire fence along most of the 4,095-kilometer border. Dhaka also complains that India has frequently diverted rivers that flow in to its territory.

    India blames Bangladesh for sheltering Indian separatists and for failing to stop smuggling and illegal migration over the border. New Delhi also has been angered by Bangladesh’s refusal to sell it natural gas and to allow transit trade across its territory.

    And then there’s the issue of hundreds of tiny Bangladeshi and Indian enclaves that lie cut off in the other’s territory. The inhabitants of these areas, that are situated near Bangladesh’s northern border with India, are effectively stateless and often have no access to schools or hospitals.

    Mr. Singh is likely to take up these issues in Bangladesh later this year. The tone of the border guard meeting seems an attempt to dress the stage for this visit.


    http://blogs.wsj.com/indiarealtime/2011/03/14/india-and-bangladesh-foes-no-more/
     
  4. sesha_maruthi27

    sesha_maruthi27 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    3,884
    Likes Received:
    1,568
    Location:
    Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh(INDIA)
    Now then is bangladesh becoming like pakistan again and all three neighbours would launch an attack from three sides.
     
  5. amitkriit

    amitkriit Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2009
    Messages:
    2,465
    Likes Received:
    1,923
    Location:
    La La Land
    Government wants more infiltrators, they feel like loosing elections if they bank solely on Indian voters.
     
  6. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    5,407
    Likes Received:
    968
    LMAO. No, I think this is a step in the right direction. The paramilitaries are not meant to be consummately lethal, they're meant to be cordoning.

    As long as Bangladesh keeps nabbing terrorist dacoitis, is big business for us and is co-operative on a whole host of international issues, we have game on.
     
  7. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    4,404
    Likes Received:
    2,783
    Location:
    Gangtok, Sikkim, India
    Tell that to the bunch of lunatics that are annihilating our northeast. Business is bullcrap when a whole bloody region is under threat of demographic challenge and fundamentalism.
     
  8. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2009
    Messages:
    31,640
    Likes Received:
    17,120
    Location:
    EST, USA
    Tshering22, that hawkish stand of yours is:
    appropriate - when BNP is on power.
    inappropriate - when AL is in power.
     
  9. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    8,120
    Likes Received:
    1,541
    Location:
    Bangalore, India
    Tshering is right Pmaitra. NE is like a mini Bangladesh right now. Congress is at fault here, as they are the ones who have been stopping so low so as to take action against the illegal immigrants, just because of power and votes.
     
  10. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    5,407
    Likes Received:
    968
    So, your solution??







    .x.x.x.
     
  11. The Messiah

    The Messiah Bow Before Me! Elite Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2010
    Messages:
    10,788
    Likes Received:
    4,552
    Them moving into India is inevitable! because eventually there country will be under water in the not so distant future.

    you cant blame only congress because bjp did squat when they were in power....in short our politicians dont care.
     
  12. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    8,120
    Likes Received:
    1,541
    Location:
    Bangalore, India
    Yes! I said Congress, because they have been in power in most of the states, most of the times.
    Maybe BSF should be given a holi gun, and whenever an infiltration happens, they spray colored water and sing "Aaiye aapka intezer tha".

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  13. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2009
    Messages:
    31,640
    Likes Received:
    17,120
    Location:
    EST, USA
    I respect your and Tshering's views Oracle. I just don't agree with this rhetoric. Here's why:
    India buoyed by Bangladesh's 'gift'

    Note, this thread is about an agreement between the two governments where lethal weapons are being discouraged. What do you expect India to do? Shoot at everyone who is infiltrating into India? It is bad press. This cannot go on forever.

    Many countries are moving towards non-lethal weapons. Many of the infiltrators cross the borders to seek livelihood, not to carry out terrorist attacks inside India. We accept refugees from all over the place. It is not only Bangladesh, but Sri Lanka and PRC (Tibet) as well. There are many refugees from Sri Lanka who are hardcore LTTE sympathisers, for reasons right or wrong. We also have reports of minorities coming in from Pakistan. Do you propose shooting them the moment they cross over into India as well?

    Of course we need to stop this infiltration. We also need to find ways to deport those that have illegally obtained ration cards. However, we do not want to give room to the opposition in Bangladesh, i.e., the BNP, to criticise India for killing Bangladeshis. The Bangladeshi voters will only see that that India killed Bangladeshis; they will not see under what circumstances they were killed. The only effect this will have on Bangladesh is that they will vote Awami League out of office touting them as 'Indian Agents' and bring BNP into power; and consequently all the operations carried out by Bangladeshi police and Bangladesh Army against anti-India terrorists hiding in Bangladesh will come to a halt.

    Think about it.
     

Share This Page