India may never be a superpower : London school of economics

Discussion in 'Defence & Strategic Issues' started by ashdoc, Mar 7, 2012.

  1. ashdoc

    ashdoc Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2010
    Messages:
    1,766
    Likes Received:
    965
    Despite India’s "impressive" rise, its ambition to be a super power may remain just that—an ambition, according to an authoritative new study by the London School of Economics to which several Indian scholars have contributed.

    It pointedly dismisses what it calls the US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s "unequivocal verdict" during her India visit in 2009 that "India is not just a regional power, but a global power’.

    The study, India: the Next Superpower? acknowledges India’s "formidable achievements" in fostering democracy, growth and cultural dynamism but concludes that these are nullified by its structural weaknesses, widespread corruption, poor leadership, extreme social divisions, religious extremism and internal security threats.

    India, it argues, still faces too many "developmental challenges" to qualify for "super power" status, or to be considered a serious "counterweight" to China, a role sought to be thrust on it by some in the West. Some of the report’s authors wonder whether India should even aspire to be a super power given its institutional weaknesses and social and economic divisions.

    Historian Ramachandra Guha, currently the Philippe Roman Chair in History and International Affairs at LSE, suggests that rather than being seduced by the bright lights of great power diplomacy, India should instead focus on reforming its institutions and repairing the social fabric that seems to be coming off its seams.

    “We need to repair, one by one, the institutions that have safeguarded our unity amidst diversity, and to forge the new institutions that can help us. It will be hard, patient, slow work,” he writes.

    The study, a summary of which was released on Wednesday, starts off by acknowledging that" India’s rise has certainly been impressive, and warrants the attention that it has commanded".

    "India has been one of the world’s best-performing economies for a quarter of a century, lifting millions out of poverty and becoming the world’s third-largest economy in PPP (Purchasing Power Parity) terms. India has tripled its defence expenditure over the last decade to become one of the top-ten military spenders. And in stark contrast to Asia’s other billion-person emerging power, India has simultaneously cultivated an attractive global image of social and cultural dynamism," it says. But then come the "ifs" and "buts".

    Plunging the knife into Indian ambitions, the report says:"Still, for all India’s success, its undoubted importance and despite its undisputed potential, there is cause for caution in assessing India’s claim to superpower status. India still faces major developmental challenges. The still-entrenched divisions of caste structure are being compounded by the emergence of new inequalities of wealth stemming from India’s economic success. India’s democracy may have thrived in a manner that few ever expected, but its institutions face profound challenges from embedded nepotism and corruption. India’s economic success continues to come with an environmental cost that is unsustainable."

    These problems are compounded by India’s "pressing security preoccupations" arising out of "insurgent violence" affecting large parts of the country and long-festering cross-border disputes.

    The best that India can hope for—the study offers as a consolation-- is "to continue to play a constructive international role in, among other things, the financial diplomacy of the G20".

    "Yet the hopes of those in the West who would build up India as a democratic counterweight to Chinese superpower are unlikely to be realised anytime soon," it concludes.

    The report forms part of LSE IDEAS’ series on "Power Shifts". Authors include Mukulike Bannerjee and D. Rajeev Sibal (both LSE) and Sandeep Sengupta, a doctoral candidate in International Relations at Oxford University.


    The Hindu : News / International : India may never be a super power: LSE study
     
    Kunal Biswas and Singh like this.
  2.  
  3. sesha_maruthi27

    sesha_maruthi27 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    3,884
    Likes Received:
    1,568
    Location:
    Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh(INDIA)
  4. chex3009

    chex3009 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2010
    Messages:
    915
    Likes Received:
    161
    Location:
    IL
    Thats the point, why should we act as a counter-weight to some country, that too a rising one and on the willingness of the western countries. Its the classic example that when they can do very little about anything they create counter-balances like India.
     
    jackhammer2 and W.G.Ewald like this.
  5. Mr.Ryu

    Mr.Ryu Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2011
    Messages:
    806
    Likes Received:
    348
    Location:
    Land of first Tejas
    All developing country have this even some developed countries UK and US too have "extreme social divisions, religious extremism and internal security threats" so what ? also corruption in name of Lobby form oil company to university's
     
  6. Bangalorean

    Bangalorean Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    6,207
    Likes Received:
    6,496
    The study says that because we have certain problems at present - corruption, bad governance, etc. - India can never be a superpower. What nonsense!

    20 years back, no one would have dreamed that India would ever be in the reckoning for a global power. Anyone who suggested this would have been laughed out of the room. Today, the situation is different.

    This silly study assumes that India will forever be in the position it is in today, and will never make any improvements to fix its problems. These people have not learned from the history of the last 20 years.
     
  7. addiction

    addiction Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2012
    Messages:
    137
    Likes Received:
    44
    India does not have the right system to make it a superpower....our policies are more inclined towards NAM kina architecture ...we cant even scare the smallest of our neighbours leave alone leading the world as superpower.. I think we should not have such aspirations in our mind until we completely eradicate poverty, corruption and caste based reservations from our society... we still import 80% of our weapons and oil, if we don’t sort out these issues we cant even dream to become a superpower..
     
  8. Dovah

    Dovah Untermensch Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2011
    Messages:
    4,754
    Likes Received:
    3,273
    Location:
    Modindia
    Challenge Accepted.
     
  9. balai_c

    balai_c Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2011
    Messages:
    417
    Likes Received:
    443
    Look at the comments of the readers of The Hindu. Speaks volumes of psychology of an average Hindu reader. Typical " India is Bad, India can never succeed ...." Kind of mentality.It is same garbage we have been enduring for the last 64 years. Such "studies" have been carried on for the last several decades. Tell us something we do not know!
     
    parijataka and ashdoc like this.
  10. Dovah

    Dovah Untermensch Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2011
    Messages:
    4,754
    Likes Received:
    3,273
    Location:
    Modindia
    If it were TOI it would have been Sickular and Maino rants.
     
  11. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    20,305
    Likes Received:
    8,270
    Location:
    011
    Executive Summary
    Nicholas Kitchen, Editor

    When Hillary Clinton visited India in 2009, the US Secretary of State’s verdict was unequivocal: ‘I consider
    India not just a regional power, but a global power.’ Eight years earlier, on the back of economic liberalisation
    in the 1990s, India had been included among the ‘BRICs’ – those developing nations whose economic
    potential was expected to take them to the heights of the world economy. Since the turn of the century,
    India’s economy has surpassed those predictions, expanding fourfold in the course of a decade. Over the
    same time, expectations that India might increasingly defi ne its political interests to match its economic
    clout have in turn grown, particularly in a West that sees in India’s democratic heritage the potential
    for strategic partnership. Indeed, for some Indian newspapers the question of India’s rise is essentially
    settled; all that is left to consider is what kind of superpower India wants to become.

    India’s rise has certainly been impressive, and warrants the attention that it has commanded. India
    has been one of the world’s best-performing economies for a quarter of a century, lifting millions out
    of poverty and becoming the world’s third-largest economy in PPP terms. India has tripled its defence
    expenditure over the last decade to become one of the top-ten military spenders. And in stark contrast
    to Asia’s other billion-person emerging power, India has simultaneously cultivated an attractive global
    image of social and cultural dynamism.

    India’s rise in geostrategic terms is rendered all the more signifi cant since its power resides at the confl uence
    of the United States’ two great hegemonic challenges: counter-terrorism operations in Afghanistan and
    Pakistan, and the management of China’s growing regional assertiveness. If India’s proud nonalignment
    during the Cold War had given it a leadership role in the developing world, its 21st century position places it at the heart of superpower geopolitics. Barack Obama’s enthusiastic endorsement of a permanent UN security council seat for India, as part of making the US-India relationship ‘a defi ning partnership of the century ahead’, speaks volumes for the global importance of how India defi nes its foreign policy.

    Still, for all India’s success, its undoubted importance and despite its undisputed potential, there is
    cause for caution in assessing India’s claim to superpower status. India still faces major developmental
    challenges. The still-entrenched divisions of caste structure are being compounded by the emergence
    of new inequalities of wealth stemming from India’s economic success. India’s democracy may have
    thrived in a manner that few ever expected, but its institutions face profound challenges from embedded
    nepotism and corruption. India’s economic success continues to come with an environmental cost that
    is unsustainable.

    Moreover, India has pressing security preoccupations. Domestically, insurgent violence affects large
    parts of India, creating risks and imposing additional costs on investment and economic development.
    Longstanding disputes necessitate that India focus its security concerns on its immediate borders and
    near-abroad, stymying efforts to defi ne its strategic interests in a broader regional or global context.
    India’s military capabilities, though growing, refl ect the consequentially narrow bureaucratic concerns
    which India’s institutional structures struggle to transcend.

    India will continue to play a constructive international role in, among other things, the fi nancial diplomacy of
    the G20, and it certainly has a soft-power story to tell as a model of liberal political and economic development.
    Perhaps even more signifi cantly, the cultural impact of Indian cuisine, literature, fi lms, music and sporting
    events will increasingly be felt globally through and beyond India’s vast diaspora. Yet the hopes of those in
    the West who would build up India as a democratic counterweight to Chinese superpower are unlikely to be
    realised anytime soon. As LSE IDEAS’ Philippe Roman Chair Ramachandra Guha argues here, it is doubtful
    whether India should seek to become a superpower. The bright lights of great power diplomacy may serve
    only to distract from the pressing requirements of India’s domestic development, which to date has neither
    locked in its successes nor laid out a sustainable path for the future.

    This report forms part of an LSE IDEAS’ series on the topic of Power Shifts. In some senses, power shifts are
    axiomatic: they refl ect the direction of wealth, status and capabilities. Yet in other respects power is a matter
    of national politics, of how countries seek to defi ne their identity and how expansively they articulate their
    interests in the world. Whether India will be willing or able to resist the calling of superpower status remains
    to be seen. The United States, in particular, is placing India at the very heart of its strategic reorientation – and
    with it, the orientation of the rest of the world – towards Asia. India’s importance for others will undoubtedly
    create the temptation to play the superpower role; detached and considered judgment should counsel India
    to regard such entreaties with due caution

    Source : LSE
     
  12. StarShip Enterprise

    StarShip Enterprise Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2010
    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    27
    we can do all the chest-thumbing on our achievements we want,
    but are we really going to challenge the menace we face :
    corruption - definitely bjp vs maino, Anna Hazare - lokpal - rants wont change any thing
    poverty ????
    religious extremism pressing issues among the many
     
    addiction likes this.
  13. tony4562

    tony4562 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2009
    Messages:
    836
    Likes Received:
    49
    There is only one superpower, that's US and she is faltering. China is not a superpower nor does China aspire to be one.These days the title superpower comes with great responsibilities and great financial burden, thus it is perplex that so many here want india to be the next superpower.
    And realistically, due to the many limitations, too many people, too little land, too little resources, too much internal/external distractions, too far away from any civilized/modern societies (rich arab sheikdoms don't count) India isn't headed towards a future of superpower either, at least not a rich one. The same applies to China, but she will just do a little better than India. Neither have any hope of matching current industrialized societies on a per-capital basis, not in this century,
     
    jackhammer2 likes this.
  14. BangersAndMash

    BangersAndMash Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2011
    Messages:
    748
    Likes Received:
    539
    Location:
    England
    "India may never be a superpower : London school of economics"

    "May never" not "can never". These studies are useless, no one can predict what will happen in the future. IMO, India has the potential to be ANYTHING it wants to be. Sure there are HUGE challenges facing India, but India is already a powerhouse. Sometimes I feel India does not recognise it's own strength and potential, mainly because any development taking place is not in your face like China for example, the media seems to mainly show the bad things and not the good things and India is too soft against internal and external security challenges. (My 2 pennies worth)

    Anyways, I only wish good things and may lady luck always shine brightly for India. :india:
     
    balai_c, W.G.Ewald and Mad Indian like this.
  15. Mad Indian

    Mad Indian Proud Bigot Veteran Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2012
    Messages:
    12,830
    Likes Received:
    7,522
    Location:
    Podigai Hills.
    Probably, you dont want your nation to be a superpower, but we are not in the same boat. Dont you dare compare your nation of slave labours and gulags to our democracy.

    We will overcome our problems, probably a bit later than expected but definitely we will...

    The question is not whether India will become a super power or not, but when?
     
  16. Bangalorean

    Bangalorean Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    6,207
    Likes Received:
    6,496
    The definition of "superpower" is something we need to agree upon, first.

    Britain in the early 20th century was a superpower in every sense of term. Agreed? And their per-capita income was not great - they had poverty and deprivation too.

    In 15 years, people will be singing a different tune. About India as well as China.
     
    SPIEZ and W.G.Ewald like this.
  17. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2011
    Messages:
    14,140
    Likes Received:
    8,528
    Location:
    North Carolina, USA
    The "super power" concept exists because of the reaction of the US to communist Russia's aggression following WWII - - the Cold War. Today the US still has this compulsion to police the world, and the UN is a farce, a fig leaf for US force projection. In such a world, what is the value of bearing the name "super power"?

    I seem to agree with Ron Paul here. :)

    And any argument about India being a super power that quotes Hillary Clinton, or any US Secretary of State, is flawed.
     
    jackhammer2, aerokan and pmaitra like this.
  18. p2prada

    p2prada Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    May 25, 2009
    Messages:
    10,233
    Likes Received:
    3,896
    Location:
    Holy Hell
    No point arguing this.

    'nuff said.:thumb:
     
    jackhammer2 likes this.
  19. sesha_maruthi27

    sesha_maruthi27 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    3,884
    Likes Received:
    1,568
    Location:
    Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh(INDIA)
    They are trying to downplay our rise by make statements like these........

    In fact they are fearing the rise of INDIA and CHINA and want to bring down both the countries by misleading both of them into a large scale war and stop our development. They are testing the nerves of both INDIA and CHINA. We as the people of ASIA must realize that the time has come for the ASIAN COUNTRIES to rule the WORLD again and it is only possible if we do not get into any type of fighting and instead must concentrate on economy and exports and do good business within ASIA.
     
    balai_c likes this.
  20. tony4562

    tony4562 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2009
    Messages:
    836
    Likes Received:
    49
    India maybe a democracy but it is only a democracy on paper, or else she would have accomplished 10-20 times more than she actually has since independence. I have written several messages right here explaining why India is not a true democracy, so I'm not going to repeat them again. Many here bank on India to be the next great power based on 2 assumptions: 1. India's exploding population 2. Indian's supposed superior smart. But unfortunately both are false. India's growing population is more a burden than an asset. The world only needs a finite number of workers to sustain the worldwide civilization and this number probablyhas already been reached. China, despite of being called the factory of the world, only employs1/10th of the population in the manufacturing sector, and the agricultural sector, which probaby only needs no more than 50 million farmers, still employs some 3-400 million under-employed people. If a lot of people is a good thing, then Africa where population grows fastest, should be accorded the stutus as next super power, but we all know that's none-sense.
    And Indians are certainly not as smart as many here believe. Now even if we ignore those IQ studies, an average indian is certainly not any smarter than an average person worldwide. And in terms of discipline and organizational skills Indians are below average at best.
    For India to become any power (read as a rich and advanced society), India needs to shed 80-90%of her population which is not possible in this century.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2012
    jackhammer2, SPIEZ and Singh like this.
  21. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2011
    Messages:
    14,140
    Likes Received:
    8,528
    Location:
    North Carolina, USA

Share This Page