India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-III

Discussion in 'Strategic Forces' started by rajkumar singh, Nov 3, 2014.

  1. rajkumar singh

    rajkumar singh Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2014
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    36
    Location:
    Ghaziabad, India, India
    India’s varied missile capabilities are catching up to be at par with those of the US and China, as talks revolve around integrating the Agni-III ballistic missile with a satellite kill vehicle. According to DRDO Chief V K Saraswat, India is considering the feasibility of developing an anti-satellite missile which will lend a superior edge to India’s missile power. -It would involve the development of lasers and an exo-atmospheric kill vehicle.

    During a speech regarding DRDO’s upcoming challenges and defence projects, DRDO Chief Saraswat touched upon the crucial issue of the anti-satellite vehicle, a capability which hitherto lies with the U.S, Russia and China. The development of an anti-satellite vehicle is feasible if the Agni-III missile and the Ballistic Missile Defence (BMD) kill vehicle are integrated. The DRDO Chief added that the effective range, which is about 1400-1500 kilometers, is sufficient to engage a satellite. India is known to have been developing an exo-atmospheric kill vehicle that can be integrated with the missile to engage satellites. -

    In the recent past, DRDO Chief V.K Saraswat has stated that India had all the building blocks necessary to integrate an anti-satellite weapon to neutralize hostile satellites in low earth and polar orbits. The Agni series of missiles already contained the propulsion module and a kill vehicle already existed in principle although it had not been formalized. According to DRDO, the Indian Ballistic Missile Defence Program can incorporate the anti-satellite weapon development. India purports development of anti-satellite weapons for electronic or physical destruction of satellites in both LEO or Low Earth Orbit (2,000 kilometers altitude above earth's surface) and the higher GEO-synchronous orbits.

    In an earlier statement, Dr. Saraswat said that while work on individual components of the system is going on, the anti-satellite (A-Sat) weapon will be built and tested only if and when the country needs it. He added that India must not lag behind in terms of space security. In addition, India has conducted many successful tests of its ballistic missile defence system wherein an "attacker” ballistic missile at an altitude of 120 kilometers was destroyed with an interceptor missile.

    Besides discussing the issue of ant-satellite weapons, DRDO Chief also talked of other crucial defence projects like the creation of a new engine besides the upgradation of Kaveri engine. While upgrade of Kaveri engine can continue, a new engine with variable cycle can be developed for the indigenous Advanced Medium Combat Aircraft (AMCA). He added that advanced integrated controls, reduced infrared signatures, advanced avionics, stealth materials such as radar absorbing paint, advanced composites and hypersonic materials are some areas that need further development. Besides, areas such as network centric warfare need attention just as urgently as means of combating nuclear biological warfare need to be developed.

    India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-III Ballistic Missile - Defence Now
    India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-III Ballistic Missile - Defence Now
     
  2.  
  3. Srinivas_K

    Srinivas_K Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    4,674
    Likes Received:
    3,351
    Re: India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-II

    If India can precisely put a satellite in an orbit, India can also shoot a satellite in the same orbit.
     
  4. DingDong

    DingDong Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2014
    Messages:
    2,227
    Likes Received:
    3,664
    Location:
    Delhi
    Re: India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-II

    Instead of shooting down the satellites, we must invent a technology to either disable them or grab them. Space debris can harm our space missions.
     
    Illusive likes this.
  5. Srinivas_K

    Srinivas_K Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    4,674
    Likes Received:
    3,351
    Re: India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-II

    Those technologies are developed all around the world. But the tests and results are not visible nor they are made public until now.
     
  6. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Messages:
    15,623
    Likes Received:
    11,703
    Re: India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-II

    News is getting better every day.
     
  7. power_monger

    power_monger Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2014
    Messages:
    537
    Likes Received:
    436
    Location:
    Bangalore
    Re: India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-II

    True.More true with missiles. suddenly there seems to so much activity around fitting a seeker to ballistic missiles all round the world.
     
  8. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Messages:
    15,623
    Likes Received:
    11,703
    Re: India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-II

    Two stage recovery vehicle with robotic arm can do that. Its an ISRO project.
     
  9. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,539
    Likes Received:
    6,539
    Re: India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-II

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Illusive

    Illusive Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,335
    Likes Received:
    1,418
    Re: India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-II

    You want to strangle the satellite to death :D.........i think an electronic pulse to disable the sat should be enough.
     
  11. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Messages:
    15,623
    Likes Received:
    11,703
    Re: India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-II

    Bhai just grab the enemy satellite and then bring it back to our base to test and reverse engineer it if need be.

    taking out is on the only option.
     
    archie and sesha_maruthi27 like this.
  12. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,539
    Likes Received:
    6,539
    Re: India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-II

    Micro satellites can also be launched that ram into enemy satellites could be another alternative?
     
  13. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Messages:
    15,623
    Likes Received:
    11,703
    Re: India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-II

    [​IMG]

    We can modify it to take out multiple satelite on one go.
     
    Srinivas_K and LETHALFORCE like this.
  14. Illusive

    Illusive Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,335
    Likes Received:
    1,418
    Re: India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-II

    Its will fry during re-entry, your latest option seems better, reusable vehicle can perform such task better but we are long way from there.
     
  15. Srinivas_K

    Srinivas_K Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    4,674
    Likes Received:
    3,351
    Re: India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-II

    Piggybacking Anti-Satellite Technologies on Ballistic Missile Defense: India’s Hedge and Demonstrate Approach

    In January 2007 China successfully tested an anti-satellite missile system. That test, although primarily meant as a warning shot across America’s bow, also helped concentrate New Delhi’s mind to begin fashioning policy responses to the militarization of space. The former head of the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO), Dr. Kasturirangan, typified India’s response when he noted: “obviously we start worrying…India has spent a huge sum to develop its capabilities and place assets in space…there is a need to look at means to securing these.”1 The scientific advisor to the Indian defense minister also warned that China’s test could possibly lead ISRO and the Defense Research and Development Organization (DRDO) to collaborate in developing satellite kill technologies.2 The debate was subsequently joined in by the chief of India’s air force Air Chief Marshal Naik who made a forceful case for building anti-satellite weapons on the grounds that, “Our satellites are vulnerable to anti-satellite weapon systems because our neighborhood possesses one.”3 These and other statements do not imply that India has an instituted anti-satellite weapon (ASAT) program. But they strongly suggest that Indian government agencies have begun exploratory efforts aimed at possibly instituting one.

    During the past three decades, the stakeholders in India’s space program have been primarily civilian. Remote sensing, weather forecasting, telecommunications, and broadcasting consumed the bulk of ISRO’s attention.4 But starting in the last decade, the Indian military’s space footprint has begun to expand. Among India’s 23 active satellites, 10 fly in geostationary earth orbits (GEO) and 13 in low earth orbits (LEO).5 Among the latter, at least three satellites, the Cartosat 2A, the RISAT 2, and a technology experimental satellite, are speculated to have military applications.6 Both the Indian Air Force and the Indian Navy have plans to acquire dedicated satellites for communications and net-centric operations. Plans are also afoot to build a constellation of satellites for navigation purposes.7 The Indian military’s embrace of the information-hungry revolution in military affairs will thus heighten dependence and also its vulnerability to potential disruption of space-based assets. It is therefore no surprise that Air Chief Marshal Naik refers to ASAT weapons as “one of our challenges of future war capability.”8

    There are two ways in which one could defend against threats to space assets: non-destructive and destructive. In non-destructive methods, “jamming” and “spoofing” are used to interfere with a satellite’s systems. Electro-optical countermeasures such as “dazzling” optical sensors are also available.9 However, for such countermeasures to work, detailed knowledge of the targeted satellite is usually necessary. Among destructive methods are the Kinetic Energy-Anti-Satellite Weapon (KE-ASAT) and the co-orbital ASAT. Kinetic energy kill vehicles are lifted into space by rockets and destroy satellites by physically ramming into them.10 Co-orbital ASAT systems on the other hand are orbited into space like any other satellite, but are put through a series of maneuvers to collide with and destroy a designated satellite.11 Thus far, there are few INDICATIONS that India is invested in non-destructive countermeasures. The evidence so far suggests that India is keeping its option on the KE-ASAT open. India has also indicated some interest in building a ground-based laser program although not much is known about the program in the public domain.12 Just recently, in March of 2011, DRDO tested a short-range ballistic missile interceptor, a radio frequency seeker, and a fiber-optic gyroscope, as parts of its ongoing anti-ballistic intercept program.13 These systems could also in theory serve as components of an operational KE-ASAT capability in the future.

    The Indian approach to developing ASAT weapon technologies is measured and exploratory. It follows the now institutionalized methodology of developing dual-use technologies that have civilian and military spin-offs; or tacking military programs onto already instituted ones. The Indian approach also emphasizes the significance of ‘technology demonstration’ over the proving of operational military systems. Technology demonstration is less provocative externally, allows long lead times for technologies to mature, and is sensitive to the difficulties of building consensus within the Indian political system. This was the path for example that India took in developing nuclear weapons, chemical weapons, and ballistic missile systems. To be sure, India has now elected in favor of operational nuclear and missile capabilities. However, for at least a decade, nuclear weapons were part of a hedge strategy. Similarly, chemical weapons were developed but never incorporated into the military’s operational planning. Based on statements from ISRO and DRDO representatives, it appears that any program to validate technologies for a KE-ASAT program would also fit into the genre of a hedge and demonstrate strategy.14

    The merits of a hedge and demonstrate strategy apart, there are pressures to test and validate key technologies for political reasons. Many Indian strategic analysts analogize from India’s harsh experience under the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) to urge the testing and validation of operational systems. They fear the possibility of an NPT-analogous space regime that might once again draw an artificial dividing line between ‘haves’ and ‘have nots’.15 Indian military leaders, perhaps wary of the DRDO’s past failures in making good on its promises to develop working systems as well as the operational demands of having capabilities on the ground, also favor operational validation over technology demonstration.16 The technologists and scientists from DRDO and ISRO however are less keen on a program of operational testing for two reasons. First, they believe that since many KE-ASAT technologies overlap with the ballistic missile defense system currently under development, especially in the areas of radar tracking and target acquisition, a separate test program would be of little practical value. But more significant, they are concerned that a full operational test would add to the problem of space debris, which now poses a serious threat to all space assets in the LEO. China’s ASAT test for example increased space debris (debris of diameter greater than 1 cm) in LEO by 15-20 percent, an experience that DRDO and ISRO are keen to avoid.17

    The ASAT debate once again attests to the status quo bias in Indian national security decision-making. It shows that Indian institutions respond to threats. But they do not necessarily anticipate them. Indian political leaders for example have still not publicly endorsed statements from ISRO, DRDO and the military. The Indian military’s wish list for an operational ASAT capability is also unlikely to be met for three reasons. First, it is not apparent that China poses an immediate operational threat to Indian space assets. Second, civilian agencies such as ISRO and DRDO have historically enjoyed far greater influence than the military in shaping strategic research and development choices. And finally, Indian political leaders are likely to find a hedge and demonstrate strategy less controversial and more economically viable. Thus an Indian ASAT program will more likely constitute a shadow capability in the short-term.

    Dr. Bharath Gopalaswamy is a Senior Research Scholar at Cornell University’s Judith Reppy Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies. Gaurav Kampani is a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow at Stanford University’s Center for International Security and Cooperation.

    Piggybacking Anti-Satellite Technologies on Ballistic Missile Defense: India’s Hedge and Demonstrate Approach - Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
     
    LETHALFORCE likes this.
  16. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Messages:
    15,623
    Likes Received:
    11,703
    Re: India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-II

    Again i was saying two stage vehicle with modified robotic arm can grab the satellite take it inside and door close then it will return to our base on runway.


     
    sesha_maruthi27 likes this.
  17. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2009
    Messages:
    31,640
    Likes Received:
    17,124
    Location:
    EST, USA
    Re: India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-II

    Is it feasible to have a satellite with a laser gun that will be able to disable another satellite? The laser needn't be powerful enough to turn the satellite into ashes. All it should be able to do is take a satellite out of operation.

    Would the laser generator be too heavy?

    Yes, you guessed it right - I had Sage Agasthya and James Bond at the back of my head.
     
  18. Ashutosh Lokhande

    Ashutosh Lokhande Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2014
    Messages:
    1,285
    Likes Received:
    561
    Location:
    Mumbai, Maharashtra, India, India
    Re: India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-II

    why a laser? maybe with just a normal anti material gun the objective can be achieved.
     
  19. Voldemort

    Voldemort Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2013
    Messages:
    1,051
    Likes Received:
    608
    Location:
    Kolkata
    Re: India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-II

    Will the govt give a go-ahead? There will be a lot of pressure from other countries.
     
  20. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Messages:
    15,623
    Likes Received:
    11,703
    Re: India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-II



    it is going to damage the optical sensor and other things on the satellite which will make it useless. You just have to fry some sensors or ICs and it will be useless.
     
  21. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Messages:
    15,623
    Likes Received:
    11,703
    Re: India Contemplates Anti-Satellite Vehicle Integration with Agni-II

    Lets wait and watch, DRDO said it has all the building block for the ASAT.
     

Share This Page