India, China to gain from reverse brain drain

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    Gen-next of immigrants in US return home ; India, China to gain from reverse brain drain

    Samir Kapadia seemed to be on the rise in Washington, moving from an internship on Capitol Hill to jobs at a major foundation and a consulting firm. Yet his days, he felt, had become routine.

    Meanwhile, friends and relatives in India, his native country, all in their early- to mid-20s, were telling him about their lives in the newly surging nation. One was creating an e-commerce business, another a public relations company, still others a magazine, a business incubator and a gossip and events website.

    "I'd sit there on Facebook and on the phone and hear about them starting all these companies and doing all these dynamic things," recalled Kapadia, 25, who was born in India but grew up in the United States. "And I started feeling that my 9-to-5 wasn't good enough anymore."

    Last year, he quit his job and moved to Mumbai.

    In growing numbers, highly educated children of immigrants to the US are uprooting themselves and moving to their ancestral countries, experts say. They are embracing homelands that their parents once spurned but that are now economic powers
    .

    Some, like Kapadia, had arrived in the US as young children, becoming citizens, while others were born in the US to immigrant parents.

    Enterprising Americans have always sought opportunities abroad. But this new wave underscores the evolving nature of global migration, which is presenting challenges to US supremacy and competitiveness.

    In interviews, many of these Americans said they did not know how long they would live abroad; some said it was possible they would remain expatriates for many years, if not for the rest of their lives. Their decisions to leave have, in many cases, troubled their immigrant parents. Yet most said they had been pushed by the dismal hiring climate in the US or pulled by prospects abroad.

    "Markets are opening, people are coming up with ideas every day, there's so much opportunity to mold and create," said Kapadia, now a researcher at Gateway House, a new foreign-policy research organisation in Mumbai. "People here are running much faster than those in Washington."

    For generations, the world's less-developed countries have suffered brain drain - the flight of many of their best and brightest to the West. That, of course, has not stopped. But now, a reverse flow has begun, particularly to countries like China and India and, to a lesser extent, Brazil and Russia. Some scholars and business leaders contend that this emigration does not necessarily bode ill for the US.

    They say young entrepreneurs and highly educated professionals sow American knowledge and skills abroad. At the same time, these workers acquire experience abroad and build networks that they can carry back to the US or elsewhere - a pattern known as "brain circulation."

    But the experts caution that in the global race for talent, the return of these expatriates to the US and US companies is no longer a sure bet.

    "These are the fleet-footed, they're the ones who in a sense will follow opportunity," said Demetrios G Papademetriou, president of the Migration Policy Institute, a non-profit group in Washington that studies population movements.

    "I know there will be people who will argue all about loyalty, etc, etc," Papademetriou said. "I know when you go to war, loyalty matters. But this is a different kind of war that affects all of us."

    The US government does not collect data on the emigration of US-born children of immigrants, or on those who were born abroad but moved to the country as young children. But several migration experts said the phenomenon was significant and increasing.

    "We've gone way beyond anecdotal evidence," said Edward JW Park, director of the Asian Pacific American Studies Program at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. He pointed out that this migration was spurred by the efforts of some overseas governments to attract more foreign talent by offering employment, investment, tax and visa incentives.

    "So it's not just the individuals who are making these decisions," he said. "It's governments who enact strategic policies to facilitate this."

    Officials in India said they had seen a sharp increase in the arrival of people of Indian descent in recent years, including at least 100,000 in 2010 alone, said Alwyn Didar Singh, a former senior official at the Ministry of Overseas Indian Affairs. Many of these Americans have been able to leverage family networks, language skills and cultural knowledge gleaned from growing up in immigrant households.

    Jonathan Assayag, 29, a Brazilian-American born in Rio de Janeiro and raised in South Florida, returned to Brazil last year. A Harvard Business School graduate, he had been working at an Internet company in Silicon Valley and unsuccessfully trying to develop a business.

    "I spent five months spending my weekends at Starbucks, trying to figure out a startup in America," he recalled.

    All the while, friends from Harvard urged him to make a change. "They were saying: 'Jon, what are you doing? Go to Brazil and start a business there!"' he said.

    Last year, he relocated to Sao Paulo and became an "entrepreneur in residence" at a leading Brazilian venture capital firm. He is now starting an online eyewear business.

    "I speak the language, I get the culture, I understand how people do business," he said.

    Calvin Chin was a Chinese-American entrepreneur born in Michigan and used to live in San Francisco, where he worked at technology startups and his wife was an interior decorator.

    Chin's mother was from China, as were his paternal grandparents. His wife's parents were from Taiwan. They are now in Shanghai, where Chin has started two companies - an online loan service for students and an incubator for technology startups. His wife, Angie Wu, has worked as a columnist and television anchor, and they have two young children.

    "The energy here is phenomenal," Chin said.

    Reetu Jain, 36, an Indian-American raised in Texas, was inspired to move to India while taking time off from her auditing job to travel abroad. Everywhere she went, she said, she met people returning to their countries of origin and feeling the "creative energy" in the developing world.

    She and her husband, Nehal Sanghavi, an Indian-American lawyer, moved to Mumbai in January 2011. But instead of continuing in accounting, she switched professions. Embracing a long-held passion, she now works as a dance instructor and choreographer and has acted in television advertisements and a Bollywood film.

    For many of these emigres, the decision to relocate has confounded - and even angered - their immigrant parents. When Jason Lee, who was born in Taiwan and raised in the US, told his parents during college that he wanted to visit Hong Kong, his father refused to pay for the plane ticket.

    Gen-next of immigrants in US return home ; India, China to gain from reverse brain drain - The Economic Times
     
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  3. hello_10

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    NRIs moving from the US to India: How much salary to expect

    That story probably made news only because of its star power. The fact that NRIs from the US are moving back to India is no shocking development. NRIs have, in the last few years, been relocating to India in large numbers, in search of better personal and professional lives. And if you are an NRI considering that move, there is one important thing that you must understand very well: the salary you will get in India.

    Kris Lakshmikanth, Founder CEO of The Head Hunters India Pvt Ltd. says, "When it comes to compensation, we find that NRIs have inflated expectations. They mainly go by hearsay; their friend or friend's friend who returned to India has told them a tall story about Indian salaries. They want to go by that yard stick."

    USD will not convert to INR

    The first thing to remember is that you will not make the rupee equivalent of your US salary in India. The cost of living in India is significantly lower than that in the US. This also means a lower labour cost in India. These factors will determine your India salary. Seema Nair, Co-Leader India HR Operations of Cisco India explains, "The salary in India (for Cisco employees moving from US to India) is related to local labour market wage rates with a potential premium for critical skill sets."

    Achyut Menon, head of Options Executive Search Pvt Ltd also adds, "In the nineties, people who were posted to India got expat salaries. But those days are over. In the last 10 years, India has become an attractive market for global companies who are not just looking to set up offshore centers here, but also to capitalize on the growing, educated and highly aspirational middle class consumer segment. Added to that is the availability of skilled labour within India itself. Companies no longer need to pay expat salaries."

    Benchmark: What then should be the broad benchmark?

    Both Lakshmikanth and Menon say that while there cannot be a standard formula, the Big Mac Index is a good guideline to calculate salaries. The Big Mac index published by The Economist, is based on the theory of purchasing-power parity (PPP), according to which exchange rates should adjust to equalise the price of a basket of goods and services around the world. The basket in this case being a McDonald's Big Mac.

    Now according to the last available index dated July 2011, a Big Mac costing USD 4.07 in the US costs USD 1.89 in dollar terms in India (Rs 85 converted at an exchange rate of Rs 45). It means that the Big Mac costs 54% less in India; the cost of living is 54% lower in India. Read another way, this means that the rupee is undervalued by 54% to the dollar and that on the basis of PPP, one dollar would actually be worth Rs 21 instead of Rs 45.

    So if you are drawing a salary of USD 100,000 in the US, you can expect to draw Rs 21 lakh in India, give or take. At an exchange rate of Rs 45, that would translate to an Indian salary of USD 46,666 or 46% of the US salary.

    "Senior management can expect anywhere between 40% and 70% of their last drawn US salary when they move to India," Menon explains, adding, "At the 70% end would be people who have moved to India to set up a development/ engineering center or to head the global company's India start-up."


    Best career move

    Having set that broad benchmark, the salary would also vary between industries and functions. You would need to choose your profile and company carefully to maximise your salary.

    "Manufacturing would pay less than technology. Within technology, we find that delivery of software is something which Indian companies have become masters in. They don't need to employ people from overseas. In fact, such people from the US are paid less than the person who stayed back in India because those returning from the US have handled fewer people teams as compared to peers in India," Lakshmikanth points out.

    Similarly, domestic Indian companies do not usually recruit NRIs for strategic positions if the NRIs are not familiar with the dynamics of the Indian market and work place.

    As an NRI moving back to India, Menon says it would be best to join a company in the US which has plans to start-up/ expand in India. "A lot of US companies across sectors like engineering, legal, analytics, financial services, pharmaceuticals are setting up operations in India.

    These companies are happy to send an Indian to India who also has experience of their other markets.
    The employee benefits because he can grow with the company's operations in India. In the beginning, the company will set up a 30-40 staff office and expand going forward. As a member of the start-up, the employee grows as the company grows, making it a win-win for both" he explains.

    Parting shot

    "At the end of the day, come back to India for the same reasons you went abroad: for personal and professional growth and happiness. Come with a long term view in mind and you won't regret it," Menon advices.

    (The author is a chartered accountant and financial writer. She also blogs at blogs.economictimes)

    NRIs moving from the US to India: How much salary to expect - Economic Times
     
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    Recession makes NRIs want to move back to India

    JAIPUR: With recession affecting the world economy, people of Indian origin settled abroad are now evincing interest in returning to India where they feel the growth story lies.

    "I come from Canada where the recession has really affected the economy. A few of my friends are planning to make investment in the country," Kamal Singh, a real estate specialist in Canada attending the annual diaspora meet Pravasi Bharatiya Divas which started here Saturday, told.

    "India we feel is on a growth path," he added.

    He said the recession, as world over, has hit the property market in Canada and the prices should have come down by almost 15 percent on an average.

    "We want to come but the government does not support us much. I wanted to provide help to the government on road safety, came out with a project which was completely free, but no one helped me," said Singh, who is in Canada for the last 30 years.

    "All they did was to ask me why do I want to do it free. It is just pathetic," he added.

    Professor Banwari Lal Meel from South Africa said people really want to come back as economy the world over is in crisis and Indians living abroad are looking towards India.

    "I feel India is an exciting market and time is right for entrepreneurs to come back to India to start something on their own here," Meel said.

    "I always feel that India has the potential to grow more than 7-8 percent that we are clocking as of now because people here are hardworking," he added.

    Meel is a professor in a medical college in South Africa and settled there for over 25 years.

    Echoing similar views, Rajeev Jain, a jeweller from the US, said he would prefer coming back to India.

    "We were doing well till the last couple of years but now things have changed. Recession has started to affect our business. We heard from our Indian jewellery exporters that they also now want to open shops in India. So, we are also thinking on the same lines," Jain added.

    "Recently there was a big jewellery fair here and my friends told me that at least 20 jewellers from Hong Kong wanted to participate in it as they thought India is the place where jewellery can be sold in this phase," he said.

    "It certainly gives you an idea of what people overseas also think of the country," he added.

    Munish Gupta of Global Organisation for People of Indian Origin, who has business in the US, Britain and Africa, said there is great potential now in the country and they would be looking for business opportunities here.

    "Investment is a one-way process whereas business opportunities comprise of partnerships, join ventures and involving local industries and I feel such ventures will be more viable in the present economic scenario in India," he added.

    Recession makes NRIs want to move back to India - The Economic Times
     
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    Can't buy a home in Mumbai? Blame the NRIs
    June 17, 2012

    Mumbai: If you're wondering why the property rates in Mumbai aren't going down, blame it on Non Residential Indians (NRIs). With the rupee falling against the dollar every day, Indians living abroad have increased their investment in the country and especially in Mumbai, meaning that the expected fall in property rates following the recent dry period in the real estate market has not materialised.

    According to a real estate source, the real estate prices in Mumbai for a person staying in the Middle East are 25-30 per cent less than what an Indian would pay. Prakash Rohera of Khar-based Kkarma realtors said, "I know about clients from the Middle East and other western countries who were earlier ready to shell out Rs. 1 crore but have now hiked it to Rs. 1.30 crore. Some don't even mind going as high as up to Rs. 1.60 crore. NRIs are investing heavily in Mumbai."

    "Just a few months ago, builders were chasing clients to buy property, and everyone was expecting the property prices to come down, but the uncontrollable inflation means that most builders are now getting calls from NRIs who want to invest. Why will builders reduce the prices when they are making their share of money anyway?" explained a broker, on condition of anonymity.

    Meanwhile, a property exhibition that's being organised in Dubai later this week is already flooded with calls from Indian builders as well as NRIs. A spokesperson for the exhibition said, "The number of builders from Mumbai participating in the exhibition is 15 per cent higher than in earlier years. For NRIs, this is like a sale. The property price has fallen by nearly 25 per cent due to the devaluation of the rupee. We're expecting good business this time."

    Manohar Shroff, secretary, Maharashtra Chamber of Housing Industry, Navi Mumbai, also claims the falling rupee is helping to boost the sale of properties in Mumbai. "The increased investment by NRIs has increased sales," he said.

    Realty expert Ajay Chaturvedi opines, "There's a slowdown in many western countries, but their currency is still stronger than ours. The falling rupee is making it easy for NRIs to invest here. They all plan to return to India someday, so why not invest in Indian properties :ranger:," he said.

    Can't buy a home in Mumbai? Blame the NRIs | NDTV.com
     
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    Bangalore hires more NRIs than other cities: Study

    BANGALORE: Among Indian cities, Bangalore hires the highest proportion of NRI professionals.

    In the January-March 2012 quarter, NRI professionals were 29% of the total number of lateral hires (people with more than three years of experience ) in Bangalore. In Delhi /NCR, this was 27%, in Mumbai 26%, in Hyderabad 18% and in Chennai and Kolkata 16% each, says a study by MyHiringClub, a global recruitment tendering platform. "Overall hiring activity was not good in the final quarter of the last financial year, but the quantum of NRI hiring has gone up. IT, pharma and healthcare companies prefer to hire candidates with international exposure,'' says Rajesh Kumar, CEO of MyHiringClub. Many of these are companies that are expanding globally and therefore need to understand global practices and market specificities , which NRIs do.

    The study finds that NRI professionals accounted for 21% of total lateral hiring in India during the quarter, a 5 percentage point increase over the previous quarter's 16%. The IT &ITES sector has seen the maximum number of NRI hiring at 23%. Pharma and healthcare accounted for 21%, FMCG 18% and infrastructure 11%. Bangalore has long been the preferred choice for NRIs. Third party hirers say 7 out of 10 candidates who want to relocate to India ask for vacancies in Bangalore. "If candidates do not have specific compulsions, based on factors like ageing parents, spouse located elsewhere, bought a home in a different city, children' s school admissions etc, most of them prefer Bangalore,'' says B S Murthy, CEO of executive search firm LeadershipCapital .

    Ajay Dutt, business head at Aim Plus Staffing, says Bangalore is the top priority destination for a majority of returning professionals. "The job opportunities are the highest here. Also, 60% of NRIs who are looking to return are techies and being in Bangalore gives them an edge,'' he says. Kris Lakshmikanth, CEO of HeadHunters, say that in most cases, the NRI preference is for city close to their hometown and for Bangalore.

    "Bangalore often becomes the only choice for candidates who have their origins in Kolkata, Bhubaneshwar, Lucknow etc. It's got great weather, it's neutral, relatively more safe to live and work and it's cosmopolitan,'' he says. India Inc is expected to hire around 35,000 "home-coming'' Indians during fiscal 2013. Some 946 employers from 11 industry segments across six cities participated in the MyHiring Club study.

    Bangalore hires more NRIs than other cities: Study - The Times of India
     
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    Reverse brain drain: For many immigrants' children, American dream lies in India, China

    Samir Kapadia seemed to be on the rise in Washington, moving from an internship on Capitol Hill to jobs at a major foundation and a consulting firm. Yet his days, he felt, had become routine.

    By contrast, friends and relatives in India, his native country, all in their early-to-mid-20s, were telling him about their lives in that newly surging nation. One was creating an e-commerce business, another a public relations company, still others a magazine, a business incubator and a gossip and events Web site.

    "I'd sit there on Facebook and on the phone and hear about them starting all these companies and doing all these dynamic things," recalled Mr. Kapadia, 25, who was born in India but grew up in the United States. "And I started feeling that my 9-to-5 wasn't good enough anymore."

    Last year, he quit his job and moved to Mumbai.

    In growing numbers, experts say, highly educated children of immigrants to the United States are uprooting themselves and moving to their ancestral countries. They are embracing homelands that their parents once spurned but that are now economic powers.

    Some, like Mr. Kapadia, had arrived in the United States as young children, becoming citizens, while others were born in the United States to immigrant parents.

    Enterprising Americans have always sought opportunities abroad. But this new wave underscores the evolving nature of global migration, and the challenges to American economic supremacy and competitiveness.

    In interviews, many of these Americans said they did not know how long they would live abroad; some said it was possible that they would remain expatriates for many years, if not for the rest of their lives.

    Their decisions to leave have, in many cases, troubled their immigrant parents. Yet most said they had been pushed by the dismal hiring climate in the United States or pulled by prospects abroad.

    "Markets are opening; people are coming up with ideas every day; there's so much opportunity to mold and create," said Mr. Kapadia, now a researcher at Gateway House, a new foreign-policy research organization in Mumbai. "People here are running much faster than the people in Washington."

    For generations, the world's less-developed countries have suffered so-called brain drain — the flight of many of their best and brightest to the West. That has not stopped, but now a reverse flow has begun, particularly to countries like China and India and, to a lesser extent, Brazil and Russia.

    Some scholars and business leaders contend that this emigration does not necessarily bode ill for the United States. They say young entrepreneurs and highly educated professionals sow American knowledge and skills abroad. At the same time, these workers acquire experience overseas and build networks that they can carry back to the United States or elsewhere — a pattern known as "brain circulation."

    But the experts caution that in the global race for talent, the return of these expatriates to the United States and American companies is no longer a sure bet.

    "These are the fleet-footed; they're the ones who in a sense will follow opportunity," said Demetrios G. Papademetriou, president of the Migration Policy Institute, a nonprofit group in Washington that studies population movements.

    "I know there will be people who will argue all about loyalty, et cetera, et cetera," he said. "I know when you go to war, loyalty matters. But this is a different kind of war that affects all of us."

    The United States government does not collect data specifically on the emigration of the American-born children of immigrants — or on those who were born abroad but moved to the United States as young children.

    But several migration experts said the phenomenon was significant and increasing.

    "We've gone way beyond anecdotal evidence," said Edward J. W. Park, director of the Asian Pacific American Studies Program at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.

    Mr. Park said this migration was spurred by the efforts of some overseas governments to attract more foreign talent by offering employment, investment, tax and visa incentives.

    "So it's not just the individuals who are making these decisions," he said. "It's governments who enact strategic policies to facilitate this."

    Officials in India said they had seen a sharp increase in the arrival of people of Indian descent in recent years — including at least 100,000 in 2010 alone, said Alwyn Didar Singh, a former senior official at the Ministry of Overseas Indian Affairs.

    Many of these Americans have been able to leverage family networks, language skills and cultural knowledge gleaned from growing up in immigrant households.

    Jonathan Assayag, 29, a Brazilian-American born in Rio de Janeiro and raised in South Florida, returned to Brazil last year. A Harvard Business School graduate, he had been working at an Internet company in Silicon Valley and unsuccessfully trying to develop a business.

    "I spent five months spending my weekends at Starbucks, trying to figure out a start-up in America," he recalled.

    All the while, Harvard friends urged him to make a change. "They were saying: 'Jon, what are you doing? Go to Brazil and start a business there!' " he said.

    Relocating to Sao Paulo, he became an "entrepreneur in residence" at a venture capital firm. He is starting an online eyewear business. "I speak the language, I get the culture, I understand how people do business," he said.

    Calvin Chin was born in Michigan and used to live in San Francisco, where he worked at technology start-ups and his wife was an interior decorator. Mr. Chin's mother was from China, as were his paternal grandparents. His wife's parents were from Taiwan.

    They are now in Shanghai, where Mr. Chin has started two companies — an online loan service for students and an incubator for technology start-ups. His wife, Angie Wu, has worked as a columnist and television anchor.

    "The energy here is phenomenal," Mr. Chin said.

    The couple have two children, who were born in China.

    Reetu Jain, 36, an Indian-American raised in Texas, was inspired to move to India while taking time off from her auditing job to travel abroad. Everywhere she went, she said, she met people returning to their countries of origin and feeling the "creative energy" in the developing world.

    She and her husband, Nehal Sanghavi, who had been working as a lawyer in the United States, moved to Mumbai in January 2011. Embracing a long-held passion, she now works as a dance instructor and choreographer and has acted in television commercials and a Bollywood film.

    "We're surrounded by people who just want to try something new," Ms. Jain said.

    For many of these emigres, the decision to relocate has confounded — and even angered — their immigrant parents.

    When Jason Lee, who was born in Taiwan and raised in the United States, told his parents during college that he wanted to visit Hong Kong, his father refused to pay for the plane ticket.

    "His mind-set was, 'I worked so hard to bring you to America and now you want to go back to China?' " recalled Mr. Lee, 29.

    Since then, Mr. Lee has started an import-export business between the United States and China; studied in Shanghai; worked for investment banks in New York and Singapore; and created an international job-search Web site in India. He works for an investment firm in Singapore. His father's opposition has softened.

    Margareth Tran — whose family followed a path over two generations from China to the United States by way of Cambodia, Thailand, Hong Kong and France — said her father was displeased by her decision in 2009 to relocate.

    "It's kind of crazy for him that I wanted to move to China," said Ms. Tran, 26, who was born in France and moved to the United States at age 11. "He wants me to have all the benefits that come from a first-world country."

    But after graduating from Cornell University in 2009 at the height of the recession, she could not find work on Wall Street, a long-held ambition. She moved to Shanghai and found a job at a management consulting firm.

    "I had never stepped foot in Asia, so part of the reason was to go back to my roots," she said.

    Ms. Tran said she did not know how long she would remain abroad. She said she was open to various possibilities, including moving to another foreign country, living a life straddling China and the United States or remaining permanently in China.

    Her father has reluctantly accepted her approach.

    "I told him, 'I'm going to try to make it in China, and if things work out for me in China, then I can have a really great career,' " she said. "He didn't hold me back."

    Reverse brain drain: For many immigrants' children, American dream lies in India, China - The Times of India
     
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    Global crisis forces reverse migration by up to 30 pc: Experts

    MUMBAI: With concerns over the global economic situation and reports on growing unemployment, there is a rise in reverse brain drain by up to 30 per cent, according to experts.

    "The reverse drain has been seen across the industries and various geographies across the globe, including the US, Canada, Australia and Europe. The number of people wanting to come back to India has gone up by 25-30 per cent as compared to pre-economic crisis," International Management Institute (IMI) Professor Satish K Kalra told PTI. :india:

    The main reason that Indians working overseas are planning to relocate is because India Inc have started paying better and working in the country continues to offer global exposure and they feel their skills have higher value on return and better career prospects, he said.

    The country's sustained growth even during uncertain times coupled with world class higher education system, like IITs and IIMs, and higher sense of belonging that makes them emotionally bound to their careers and society add further to this decision, he said.

    "It could bring in acceleration of learning in some of the niche fields like biotech, automobile, construction, oil and gas," Kalra added. :cool2:

    The returning Indians would have got exposed to better technologies in these fields and it would be easier for India Inc to embrace this and the local workforce would gain from this new experience, he said. :thumb:

    "We could also see a more disciplined workforce as returning Indians would cultivate a respect around time boundaries and ability to work without follow ups," he said.

    He added that many large global consulting firms have also opened their research centres in India and most of them have dedicated industry practices such as oil and gas, alternate energy and construction, etc.

    "The availability of professionals having spent time in these domains is a beneficial situation for KPOs and one of the reasons for their increasing numbers," he said.

    Indian KPOs account for almost 70 per cent of global volumes, and the global KPO market is expected to grow to USD 17 billion by 2013-14, according to industry experts.

    VistaMind CEO Arks Srinivas said Indian market due to its global as well as domestic factors has created a need for skilled and experienced labour and hence the generation of more and more jobs.

    "The Indian market is customer centric and with an increase in the purchase power of the consumer, employment generation is at an all time high," he said.

    There are sectors in the Indian economy, which are still growing or at least not seeing a downturn, education and health are two such sectors that will remain productive for more time to come, he said.

    "While the financial industry is in doldrums, the ability to get jobs in marketing and sales of any sector will still be possible and re-skilling would be the way to go," Srinivas said.

    ApnaCircle.com Founder and CEO Yogesh Bansal said it is very typical of every Indian to want to work in the West, however, lately these countries have been struggling to provide employment to their own people. :ranger:

    "As mentioned the suffering sectors are mostly IT, banking and marketing professionals," he added.

    However, countries like Africa land Southeast Asia, which are expanding their businesses and starting new industries, are increasingly open to hiring globally skilled talent for mid-level to senior jobs, Srinivas said.

    Professionals from India are uniquely suited for these jobs because they have the experience of working in an emerging market, he added.

    Global crisis forces reverse migration by up to 30 pc: Experts - The Economic Times
     
  9. Energon

    Energon DFI stars Stars and Ambassadors

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    It's common practice to lump India and China together for many things, but actually this is a false equivalency. There's a huge difference between the brain drain phenomena of India and China. Unlike China I fear the case for reverse brain drain in the case of India is overstated. China has invested heavily in infrastructure and made rapid advances in the establishment of a business friendly economic system, they have also made substantial investments in institutions of higher education for science and technology. India on the other hand has done no such thing. There is very little actual advancement in science and technology (back office operations dont count) and the business environment sucks. Also there are no worthwhile universities that attract Western educated faculty members, this is why virtually all people who PhDs and join academia remain in the United States. China on the other hand attracts a vast number of faculty members with Western education in their new universities. The Indian success stories in the news papers are selective and merely represent a small minority. Most Indian repatriates actually have a hard time re adjusting and get frustrated because of the lack of proper infrastructure.

    The Chinese repatriation model is far, far more profitable than its Indian counterpart because people with Western education and experience who migrate back to China are bound to be more productive. This is quite tragic actually because there is such a vast pool of highly educated and qualified Indians who can come back and reinvigorate the economy, but as usual the Indian establishment is missing out on yet another golden opportunity.

    Also to the OP, please stop these cut/paste threads. This forum is actually for you to give your own thoughts. You need not paste whole articles, links will suffice.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2012
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  10. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    Im saying this for the third time on this forum. that, I post 'only' my own search/posts/ideas I have posted on the different forums under my IDs, hello_10/sunny_10, and as I find most of the members of 20s, so I first post at least 6-7 posts/topics to first let them understand any certain topic first. we first need to give a level of information to new people before involving them in any talks. and thats why I first post my own key posts/topics i searched, to help them understand that certain topic first to start a healthy talk in the light of proper information through the credible references too ....

    and thats how I started my own threads.... thanks
     
  11. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    No jobs for experienced NRIs returning to India
    December 22, 2011

    Mumbai, Dec 22 (TruthDive): NriJobPortal.com conducted an online survey between December 1-10, 2011 and revealed shockingly that NRI job seekers with 15 years of experience have only a 5% chance of getting hired in India. Non-resident Indians with less experience are most likely to get a job back home.

    The figures released by NriJobPortal.com show that people who have been out of the country for a few years are more likely to be absorbed in the Indian workforce as compared with those on foreign shores for more than a decade.

    NRI job seekers with 1-5 years of experience have the greatest chance to get hired in India. This category of job seekers have a 52 per cent change to get a job back home, making them the strongest contenders. On the other hand, job seekers with 5-10 years of experience have a 28 per cent chance to get hired and those with more than 15 years having only a 5 per cent chance to get hired.

    Overall, the number of Indians going back to their country for good is on the rise. With declining salaries abroad, an increasing number of non-resident Indian IT professionals are moving back to their home country, the survey stated. Hiring of NRIs is expected to be 19 per cent of total recruitment activity during Jan-Mar 2012.

    The survey shows that 62 per cent of respondents (which includes employers and recruitment consultants) anticipate 18 per cent hiring of non-resident Indian (NRI) in IT and IT-enabled firms in India in the third quarter of current fiscal year.

    Among 11 surveyed industries, IT and IT-enabled services will lead in NRI professionals hiring activity with 29 per cent. They also anticipate highest growth of 9 per cent from Q4 of last year and 2 per cent up from Q4 of this fiscal year.

    This is followed by automobile, engineering and manufacturing industries (16 per cent, which is up by 8 per cent from Q4, FY’11 and up by 8 per cent from Q3, FY’12). Banking & financial services is at 14 per cent, up by 4 per cent from Q4, FY’11 but a dip by 3 per cent from Q3, FY’12. Infrastructure, on the other hand, is at 13 per cent and telecom & FMCG is up by 3 percent, whereas retail is up by 2 per cent from last quarter.

    “The crises and increased good opportunities in India [are attracting many NRIs to head back]. In addition to that, many Indian companies are shutting offices in the West. It is not only the crisis in the west but also economic and social factors that [are influencing the decision of many NRIs],” Rajesh Kumar, CEO of NriJobPortal.com, said in the NRI Hiring outlook report.

    “Increasing number of NRI professional recruitment is likely to take place in the coming quarter as salary gaps have declined sharply. An increasing number of people are now returning because the advantages of returning back to India outweigh the disadvantages,” Kumar added.

    The highest number of NRIs who want to return home will be able to find jobs in Bangalore, followed by Mumbai, Delhi and Hyderabad.

    No jobs for experienced NRIs returning to India | TruthDiveTruthDive
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2012
  12. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    Younger CEOs paid more in India than US

    MUMBAI: A new breed of younger Indian CEOs is rewriting the rules of the compensation game. In the process, they are topping their American and European peers to stand out as the highest paid executives globally, something which was once the exclusive preserve of executives from companies based outside India.

    The average annual salary for an Indian CEO below the age of 50 years now stands at Rs 7.9 crore. Compared with the Rs 7.3 crore that American corner office occupants earn and Rs 7.8 crore pocketed by European bosses, it highlights the rising salaries of younger CEOs, especially in promoter-run firms in India.

    Younger Indian CEOs may have stolen a march over their global peers in the salary sweepstakes but overall, Indian CEO salaries are substantially lower than their international counterparts. This was revealed in a study by global recruitment firm Randstad, which was commissioned by TOI to compare the differentials that exist between salaries of Indian CEOs vis-a-vis their western counterparts.

    The compensation of Indian CEOs, though growing sharply, is still 45% lower than their American peers and 21 % lower than European CEOs. However, the gap in salaries when compared to European CEOs is shrinking faster, especially in the manufacturing, energy and infrastructure segments, the study points out. Indian CEOs received an average salary of Rs 6.3 crore.

    The study is based on conversion of international salaries to Indian rupees by applying a Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) conversion factor of 20.224. This basically means that the exchange rate is adjusted so that identical goods in two different countries have the same price when expressed in the same currency. As a representative sample, Randstad took into consideration companies that form the BSE100 (for India), FT100 (for Europe) and S&P100 (for US) indices as of August 20, 2012. All long-term benefits like stock options were excluded.

    "With current levels of inflation, and if India's GDP shows higher growth, the gap between salaries in India will come closer to the levels of the western world. The younger Indian CEOs are compensated better, because there is a higher concentration of promoter CEOs in this group. We can see that in sectors like manufacturing, energy and infrastructure, first-generation promoters are passing on the CEO mantle to their heirs and other family members," says Balaji E, MD & CEO, Randstad India.

    However, the trend of promoter CEOs earning more than professional CEOs is not restricted to the younger lot. Across India Inc, promoter CEOs earn 53% higher than professional CEOs, the study revealed.

    While professional Indian CEOs still need to catch up with their international peers, the gap in the average salary is highest in the information technology, telecom and communications, finance, retail, media and entertainment sectors, closely followed by the consumer goods industry. In the manufacturing, energy and infrastructure segments, the compensation of Indian CEOs is at par with the European CEOs due to the higher concentration of promoter CEOs in these two segments.

    "Today, more and more Indian CEOs get compensated at world-class levels. This trend is driven by several factors. Firstly, it speaks of the professionalization of management and secondly, the most critical constraint to growth is the availability of general managers. It is just pure supply and demand. Finally, professional managers have a considerable set of opportunities to choose from. The broad implication is that, going forward, India cannot become competitive by playing cost arbitrage but has to master the innovation game," says Vijay Govindarajan, professor at Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College and a part of the celebrated Thinkers 50 group.

    Some Indian executives, however, think that the differences in the way salaries are structured for Indian CEOs compared to their western counterparts would continue for a while. "There is a difference between CEO compensation in India as compared to the US and Europe. American CEOs, in particular, and businesses have much greater risks attached to them. The stress that leaders undergo makes them demand far greater compensations whereas in the Indian context, the time lines for performance and the risk factor is much lesser," says Hari T, chief people officer at IT services major Mahindra Satyam.

    Indian CEOs from the manufacturing segment earned the highest at Rs 8.7 crore, followed by CEOs from consumer goods with an average salary of Rs 5.6 crore. The other significant point to have emerged from the study is that private sector CEOs are compensated 21 times more than public sector CEOs. With an average salary of Rs 6.3 crore, private sector CEOs are compensated far better than their public sector counterparts, who earn an average compensation of Rs 0.3 crore. The salaries of CEOs of the public sector do not include benefits and perquisites provided to those in the private sector.

    Rajeev Chopra, CEO and MD, Philips Electronics India, is more pragmatic and refuses to buy into the euphoria over increasing salaries of Indian CEOs. "Broadly speaking, compensation has always been and will continue to be a function of a myriad factors, such as the prevailing salary structure in the country's job market, the specific industry, the business situation a particular company finds itself in, etc. Therefore, clearly, a 'one size fits all approach' has not worked and may not work in the context of global salaries."

    Be that as it may, due to the increasing complexities of Indian businesses, salaries can only go up.

    Besides, comparisons would never cease considering salaries remain the biggest point of discussion across management levels in global businesses.

    Younger CEOs paid more in India than US - The Times of India
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2012
  13. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    NRI grooms no longer in demand
    Oct 23, 2012

    The charm of the NRI groom is fading in the marriage market as overseas economies continue to be unstable.

    Indian brides, it seems, are paying attention to what the song, "Pardesiyon Se Naa Ankhiyaan Milana", preaches. Girls from NRI families too, are humming "Yeh Mera India". It's India shining for both when it comes to seeking life partners, as Indian and NRI girls want matches in India. Now, while 50% of Indians as well as NRIs discreetly mention in their wedding profiles on matchmaking portals that they are not interested in an NRI match, the remaining 50% don't put 'NRI' as even one of the options in the preferences.

    Gourav Rakshit from a wedding portal says, "During recession in 2008 and 2009, 60% of the people registering on our portal mentioned 'no NRI grooms'. In 2011, after America was stripped of its AAA rating and many NRIs returned home looking for jobs, this year too, 50% have mentioned they don't want NRI grooms." Rakshit adds that things have gotten worse as even NRI girls are now looking for India-based grooms. "Many NRI families seeking a match for their daughters too have mentioned they don't want an NRI groom," he says.

    Faced with declining salaries and job cuts, an increasing number of NRIs is moving to India. The Doshi family in New Jersey is one such. Their daughter, Hetal, who is married to an IT professional, recently shifted to India after her husband lost his job. Her parents have now decided to look for an Indian groom for their younger daughter, Shikha. Her father, Jigen Doshi, told us, "Many NRIs are shifting to India. Western economies are unstable."

    Murugavel Janakiraman, founder and CEO of another wedding portal, says, "With the Indian economy booming, Indian grooms are looking as attractive as the NRI ones. Indian brides are realising that professionals in India are as smart, qualified and well-paid as their NRI counterparts."

    Says Anushree Pal, who is looking for a groom for her 26-year-old daughter, "After 9/11 and other terror attacks around the world, there have been so many reports where Indians have not been treated well. I don't want that to be the case with my daughter. Also, we have everything here now - from top brands to supermarkets. My daughter will have it all, so why go for an NRI?"

    For research analyst Preeti Vats*, 26, India is where the heart is. "Given the recession that's hit the foreign market, my parents haven't looked for a match outside India. India is progressing at an amazing rate - we have everything here, including our families." Says Suggandha Mehrotra, 26, 'I would rather marry a desi because they are a safer bet. There are fewer chances of them being handed the pink slip."

    NRI grooms no longer in demand - Times Of India
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2012
  14. Snuggy321

    Snuggy321 Regular Member

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    lol once the times change, they all star running back. But this is a win win for both the returning Indians and the Indian economy as a whole.
     
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  15. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    Chidambaram pleads Indian human resources to return back

    Asking the young talent to contribute in building India, Union Finance Minister P Chidambaram today asked country's human resources to return back after spending few years in other parts of the world to meet challenges of their own country.

    "After 11, 12 months your (students) temptation is to migrate to USA or elsewhere in the world...it is a legitimate desire...Indian human resources will find opportunities all over the world...seize these opportunities...spend few years...but please remember that there is no other place in the world which can challenge you (students) like India," he told an august gathering after formally inaugurating the Indian School of Business (ISB) campus here.

    "Spend a few years wherever you feel whether in USA, Europe, Latin America, East Asia or Africa, but please remember it is only India and no other place that can challenge you (students)," he said.

    He asked the young talent to ask themselves a few questions as to where in other country of the world one need to add 1,00,000 MW of power, construct thousands of kms of roads, bring drinking water and sanitation to over 700 million of people.

    "The greatest challenge is to build India," he said referring to the brain drain.

    "At some stage or the other return back and help build India...challenge is not only in business but elsewhere too," he said.

    Expressing concern over "limited world class institutions" in the country, he said that he had exhausted all five fingers of one of his hand in listing these institutions.

    "We have one institution of world class in Science, a couple in engineering and technology, one in Mathematics and one in international studies," he said, adding that the country need to build world class institutions.)

    Talent is distributed throughout the country, Chidambaram said, adding that the important task is to build world class institutions as is reflected in the ISB.

    He urged the managements of the world class institutions not to compromise on merit during entry level of students.

    The Union Finance minister said that his ministry was committed to education loan programme by the banks.

    "24 lakh students in India have borrowed loan for education and the outstanding amount with the banks is to the tune of Rs 52,000 crore," he said, adding that banks must lend more money for the purpose of education.

    Chidambaram regretted that hardly anyone comes back to build power sector or other areas back in India.

    He said that the government would romp individuals outside it to build something new for the country.

    "Help government to do its work," he told the young talent.

    Hailing business houses for investing in education, Chidambaram said that "what they get out of business is far less satisfying than what they give to the society."

    He said that talent is enormous in the country what is missing is opportunity. "There is huge talent in India, but the opportunities are limited," he added.

    There is imbalance between the talent available and the opportunity prevalent in the country, Chidambaram said.

    He said that there was a need to have 18 universities in Punjab as against eight being recently set up and at least 80 universities in the country.

    The Union minister regretted that the universities and colleges in the country are becoming "teaching shops." "There is poor infrastructure, unqualified staff, outdated text books, untrained personnel and poor methodology is adopted to teach students," he said.

    Chidambaram complimented Punjab Chief Minister Parkash Singh Badal for his farsightedness in giving land for the campus.

    "Opportunities lost by Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu and Karnataka is seized by Andhra Pradesh and thus ISB Hyderabad was born in 2001-02. After 11 years, ISB's second campus came up at Mohali," he said.

    "The contribution of government of Punjab will be remembered for many many years," the Union minister said.

    "Not only young are farsighted, even the older statesman is farsighted," he said referring to Badal.

    Speaking on the occasion, Badal said that the ISB would help in the upliftment of rural Punjab and development of small and medium enterprises.

    "The ISB will be a trendsetter and become a school at par with the Harvard," he said.

    Badal said that Punjab had attained the growth rate of 6.74 per cent as against the target of 5.9 per cent in the ninth five year plan.

    He said that Punjab jumped from the 14th position to third in the national education development index.

    The state chief minister said that eight new universities are being set up in the state and 70 new colleges are coming up to boost the higher education.

    The foundation stone of the ISB at Mohali was laid two years back and it commenced its operation from April, 2012 with 200 students taking admissions in Post Graduate programme in management. The event was also attended by a high profile gathering including the Chairman of the ISB, Adi Godrej and founding board members of the Mohali campus, Analjit Singh, Rakesh Bharti Mittal, Sunil Kant Munjal and Atul Punj, other members of the ISB Executive Board, senior government officials, business leaders, faculty and representatives from the ISB's Associate Schools, students, alumni and staff.

    Endorsing the Board's support, Adi Godrej, Chairman, ISB, said, "Our expansion into Mohali, allowing for a greater geographic outreach apart, has given us an opportunity to foray into important new areas ¿ Manufacturing, Healthcare, Infrastructure and Public Policy ¿ through the specific institutes set up for the purpose.

    "This, we believe will provide a significant fillip to nurturing talent and research in areas critical to India's development".

    The dignitaries unveiled a plaque to commemorate the occasion. The plaque was designed and created by Padmashree Nek Chand Saini, the creator of the iconic Rock Garden of Chandigarh.

    Speaking at the occasion, Ajit Rangnekar, Dean, ISB said, "The inauguration of our Mohali campus is an important milestone in the ISB's eleven year successful history of setting benchmarks in the field of management education".

    The ISB operates one school with two campuses in Hyderabad and Mohali and has a unified governance structure, with the ISB Executive Board overseeing and supporting both the campuses.

    Chidambaram pleads Indian human resources to return back - Indian Express
     
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  16. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    Dhoni richer than Bolt, Djokovic

    The Hindu : Sport / Cricket : Forbes: Dhoni richer than Bolt, Djokovic

    Team India captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni has beaten the likes of sprinter Usain Bolt, tennis ace Novak Djokovic and teammate Sachin Tendulkar in the latest list of world’s 100 richest sportspersons, released by the Forbes magazine.

    According to the list, Dhoni is ranked 31st, which is way ahead of Djokovic (62nd), Bolt (63rd) and Tendulkar (78th)
    .

    Star footballers Wayne Rooney and Fernando Torres are also behind Dhoni in the latest list.

    Boxing champion Floyd Mayweather topped the list with total earnings of USD 85 million while Fillipino pugilist Manny Pacquiao, with earnings of USD 62 million, and golf legend Tiger Woods, with USD 59.4 million, are second and third.

    Of his total earnings of 26.5 million, Dhoni earns 23 million through endorsements. Tendulkar has earned USD 18.6 million with 16.5 million from endorsements.

    Interestingly, the Indian captain’s earnings through endorsements are more than the world’s most popular footballer Lionel Messi.

    Although Messi is 11th in the list with total earnings of USD 39 million — his earnings from endorsements is USD 19 million, which is 4 million less than that of Dhoni.

    Manchester United’s star striker Rooney is placed 37th with total earnings of USD 24.3 million.

    Djokovic is 62nd with USD 20.6 million, while Usain Bolt is 63rd with total earnings of USD 20.3 million.

    Maria Sharapova is the richest among women’s sportspersons at 26th with earnings of USD 27.9 million.

    While Roger Federer is ranked fifth in the list, David Beckham (8th) and Cristiano Ronaldo (9th) are the two footballers, who are in the top-10.

    The Hindu : Sport / Cricket : Forbes: Dhoni richer than Bolt, Djokovic
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2012
  17. natarajan

    natarajan Senior Member Senior Member

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    sameway get back money from swiss bank,reverse money drain
     
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  18. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    NRIs becoming 'Not- Required Indians' in India
    October 21, 2012

    Fewer jobs available back home as more people now looking to return

    Hopeful non-resident Indians (NRIs) looking to return back home may find it difficult gaining a foothold in the country as there are few takers for professionals who until now were not a part of India’s growth story.

    According to a new study conducted by MyHiringClub.com & NriJobPortal.com, there are fewer jobs available for people residing out of India. Non-resident Indian (NRI) professionals hiring activity has declined by 11 per cent from the first quarter of 2011.

    Last quarter, NRI professionals made up only 13 per cent of the total employees hired by India Inc, portraying a dismal picture for Indians living overseas.

    The findings of the portal suggest an increasing number of NRIs are actively looking for a job in India. “The recent decline in jobs offered to NRIs coincided with an increasing number of ‘desperate’ NRIs wishing to return to their home bases. At least 25 to 30 per cent NRI professionals are desperately looking to come back to their homeland and they are continuously trying and approaching Indian employers and consultants,” said the study.

    IT registered a dip of 3 per cent y-o-y or 6 per cent q-o-q but still saw the maximum number of NRIs join the sector. Of the total NRIs hired over the period, 17 per cent were absorbed by IT companies.

    This was followed by pharma & healthcare at 13 per cent, which saw a decline of 8 per cent y-o-y and 8 per cent q-o-q. FMCG hired 12 per cent after witnessing a decline of 4 per cent y-o-y or 6 per cent q-o-q. Automobile & manufacturing stood at 11 per cent; a decline of 3 per cent y-o-y or 4 per cent q-o-q. Banking & financial services was at 9 per cent; a drop of 1 per cent y-o-y but did not see any change q-o-q. Telecom, with all the problems the industry is facing in the country, hired 7 per cent of the total NRIs that were employed in the country. This was a decline of 11 per cent y-o-y or 6 per cent q-o-q. Infrastructure was at 5 per cent; a decline of 1 per cent y-o-y or 6 per cent q-o-q.

    Within India, Bangalore seems to be the most welcoming to NRIs as it hired 18 per cent of total NRIs employed in Q2, FY’12, followed by Hyderabad (16 per cent), Mumbai (16 per cent), Delhi / NCR (15 per cent), Chennai (13 per cent) and Kolkata (8 per cent).

    Cost Control activity in India Inc and overall low hiring activity were cited as the main reasons behind the lesser number of NRI professionals being employed in the country.

    NRIs becoming 'Not- Required Indians' in India - Emirates 24/7
     
  19. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    Court Sentences Spy Who Sold Stealth Bomber Secrets to China
    Jason Mick (Blog) - January 26, 2011

    Mr. Gowadia helped designed the stealth and propulsion systems of the B-2 bomber :thumb:, while at Northrop Grumman. But in 1999 he found a consulting firm and began selling his secrets to foreign nations, including China.

    [​IMG]

    The Cold War may be over, but the art of spying is far from dead. If the recent case of Anna Chapman -- a Russian vixen turned super-spy -- wasn't reminder enough, we have the case of Noshir Gowadia, a convicted Hawaiian-based spy who sold U.S. Air Force secrets to China.

    I. From Top Engineer to Dangerous Spy :lol:

    This man, now 66 years old, was born in India but immigrated to the U.S., starting a new life as a professional engineer. At his new work he gained access to some our nation's most valuable secrets. The man in fact designed those secrets while working with top military contractor Northrop Grumman. :india:

    Mr. Gowadia, billed himself as "father of the technology that protects the B-2 stealth bomber from heat-seeking missiles" . He was among the principle design engineers working on the B-2's propulsion system during his career with Northrop that lasted from 1968 to 1986. :india:

    In the late 1990s, he struck out on his own, founding a consulting firm in 1999 dubbed "Gowadia, Inc."

    Over the next five years he reportedly proceeded to try to sell foreign operatives our nation's stealth secrets, some of which he concocted. He sent information to operatives from Germany, Israel, and Switzerland.

    And his biggest transaction was his transmission of a wealth of data to the People's Republic of China. That transaction allowed China to jump-start its stealth aerospace efforts and design a stealth missile. It also netted Mr. Gowadia $110,000 USD, which he used pay off his mortgage on a luxury home on the island of Maui. :china:

    But that gain would result in a far greater loss, the loss of his freedom.

    II. The Arrest

    In 2005, Mr. Gowdia was arrested after the CIA and FBI analyzed his communications. Federal authorities raided Mr. Gowdia's penthouse only to discover documents showing his communication of state secrets to eight separate nations. Mr Gowdia admitted to sending the classified information, but said he only did so to "to establish the technological credibility with the potential customers for future business."

    The U.S. government clearly didn't buy that excuse. They charged Mr. Gowdia with 18 counts, including espionage charges, charges about the transmission of classified documents to a foreign state, charges stemming from his role in designing Chinese stealth missiles, and money laundering charges.

    The trial dragged on through 2007 as Mr. Gowdia's defense team insisted they needed access to classified materials in order to give a proper defense. Once they obtained those materials after a thorough security screening, the trial was further delayed, as the defense claimed Mr. Gowdia was suffering from narcissistic personality disorder. The defense brought in Richard Rogers, a forensic psychology professor at the University of North Texas, and Dr. Pablo Stewart, a psychiatry professor at the University of California, San Francisco to testify about Mr. Gowdia's supposed condition.

    On November 20, 2009, a federal magistrate ruled that the experts' testimony was not credible. U.S. Magistrate Kevin S.C. Chang wrote that just because the defendant couldn't communicate well with his defense team didn't mean he was incompetent and unable to stand trial, as the defense claimed.

    III. The Sentence

    After a three-month jury trial, Mr. Gowdia was finally found guilty of 14 out of 17 charges, with a verdict arriving August 9, 2010. Sentencing was delayed until this week. While Mr. Gowdia faced up to a life sentence in prison, he was sentenced to a slightly lesser sentence of 32 years in federal prison.

    Assistant US Attorney Ken Sorenson who prosecuted the case told the Associated Press that he was "a little disappointed" with the sentence. "But 32 years is stiff and in many ways an appropriate sentence for him. We're confident the message is sent that when you compromise US national security, when you disclose national defense secrets, when you profit by US national defense information, that you will be punished, you will be pursued, you will be convicted," Sorenson continued.

    If he lives long enough, he may eventually see parole, but Mr. Gowdia likely will spend most of the remainder of his life behind bars.

    His family claims that he is innocent and is fighting to appeal the decision. States his son, Ashton, to the Associated Press, "My father would never, ever do anything to intentionally to hurt this country. We hope the convictions will be overturned and he'll be able to go home."

    In a similar case, an elderly Chinese spy working at Boeing was recently sentenced to 15 years behind bars.

    DailyTech - Court Sentences Spy Who Sold Stealth Bomber Secrets to China
     
  20. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    few days before we were talking that, "US can go against Jesus, their Pope, but not against the people who feed them. as, Jesus himself can't feed the common Americans but its the high qualified Indians Hindus, who feed them by running their economy/industries......."

    its not just the defense sector, like how this developer of stealth aircraft gave his consultancy to Chinese company for the work he did for US's defence, the aircraft B-2 which was used against Iraq in early 90s if I remember. but in real life, the technologies are every where. whether its the defense sector, manufacturing sector, mining/construction/water/piping industries, common businesses, medicines etc, ....... Indian top qualified professionals are back boon of US's economy in all ways. there might be many engineering/medical/business qualified people of US itself but we do know that their people didn't grow up in the environment, the very competent Indians qualified for their high ranked institutes. there might be many professionals in line to copy the works by the indian professionals but Americans can't ignore the 'main' Hindu people who are behind running industries/businesses/medicines etc......

    its not that even Hotmail was developed by Sabir Bhatia, and how Indian Hindu professionals have made many billionaires in US by their talents. like how Indian Hindus have been of use for the British and Americans for over last 100 years. but just think about this man, he gave 5 years consultancy to Chinese company and was sentenced for 32 years. here, will they like to lose these people to India to directly get involved in different projects in India, in their field of competency????? i dont think Jesus has blessed this much strength to Americans that they may openly go against these Indian Hindus who feed them, definitely not.........
     
  21. Virendra

    Virendra Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2010
    Messages:
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    Location:
    Delhi, India, India
    Everyone has been rendering small cuts on India lately.
    Reason? India doesn't bite back and Indians look like they don't care for their kind.
    The cohesive unity seems to have dissolved in some diluting soft power drama.
     

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