India-china Economic Engagements In A Global Context – Analysis

Discussion in 'Subcontinent & Central Asia' started by Srinivas_K, May 24, 2015.

  1. Srinivas_K

    Srinivas_K Senior Member Senior Member

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    India-China Economic Engagements In A Global Context – Analysis
    [​IMG]China - India relations
    Eurasia Review May 22, 2015 1, Analysis, Business No Comments

    By Eurasia Review

    By Ram Upendra Das and Reena Marwah

    Prime Minister Modi’s visit to China is being analysed in different quarters and the trend will remain so in examining the specifics. However, India-China relations in general and economic relations in particular, would have to be placed in an overall context. While the context would determine the bilateral, the converse would also be true.

    With a GDP rate of growth of 7 % in 2014-15 and envisaged to grow at 7.5 % and more in the coming fiscal year, the Indian growth trajectory is visibly vibrant. India’s footprint is expanding – not in terms of territorial expansion or maritime circumcising, but in terms of its emergence and visibility as a responsible partner of the developing world, and an engine of growth in the regional and global arena.

    There are various layers of India’s economic engagements with the rest of the world, including in the region. These together have important implications for India-China bilateral economic pursuits. First and foremost, is the South Asian region which is followed by India’s Act East Policy. But the engagements cannot stop at that. India’s economic linkages with the Central and West Asia are important, too. Beyond this are the imperatives of more intensive partnerships in Africa and Latin America, alongside the Caribbean region. On the other hand, with India’s economic dynamism, one must not lose sight of its economic dialogue with the developed world. Each of these need serious consideration.

    India’s immediate neighbours in South Asia are the most crucial partners. They both need each other and going by the Indian civilizational ethos India has always believed in shared prosperity. To assess the above, it would be useful to question, at the outset, if India has been a responsible partner to neighbouring countries in South Asia? India has remained one of the most important trade partners of the SAARC members. It has also provided duty free access to goods of five countries of the SAARC. A rather little known fact has been that the trade relations with Pakistan have made substantive progress since the joint statement between the two countries in 2011 with Pakistan moving from positive list of imports from India to negative list. India reciprocated with relaxing restrictions on investment from Pakistan. More recently, the land settlement between India and Bangladesh can only augur well for the business sentiments in the two countries. With Sri Lanka, Nepal and Bhutan, India has already forged closer and stronger economic ties as the statistics would suggest. In Afghanistan, India’s presence in terms of development assistance is quite well-known.

    India’s humanitarian assistance to Nepal, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Maldives during times of natural disasters like the earth-quake, tsunami etc. have always been appreciated. As Prime Minister Modi rightly articulated during the 18th SAARC Summit at Kathmandu (2014) “India’s vision for the region rests on five pillars – trade, investment, assistance, cooperation in every area, contacts between our people – and, all through seamless connectivity. There is a new awakening in South Asia; a new recognition of inter-linked destinies; and, a new belief in shared opportunities.” By no means are such pronouncements mere words.

    In terms of India’s Act East Policy, the comprehensive economic partnership agreements with Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Singapore and ASEAN have remained building blocks for a larger Asian economic integration under the aegis of Regional Economic Cooperation Agreement (RCEP) within the ASEAN+6 configuration. However, the shared prosperity must extend to countries in the extended neighbourhood of East Asia to cover Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam (CLMV) countries as these countries provide avenues to evolve Regional Value Chains (RVCs), of which India could be an active part. The Eagle must not abandon the next door Nest country i.e. Thailand which is strategically positioned to be a bridge for India to Act East. A comprehensive agreement with Thailand including trade in goods, trade in services and investment would deepen the economic linkages with this ‘culturally-similar-bridge-country’. In addition, negotiations with Indonesia, Australia and New Zealand must also be completed so as to make India a pro-active economic player in the RCEP negotiations. This is crucial for two prime reasons: first, since this would be an important arrangement to interact with China, especially in terms of setting the rules of the game while maintaining ‘ASEAN centrality’; and second, because RCEP assumes special meaning for both India and China in the wake of mega-economic groupings such as TPP and TTIP of which both are not members. The FTAAP under APEC remains elusive for India as it is still not part of APEC, which in any case has not much to show as any meaningful success in concrete economic terms.

    India along with other SAARC members can serve as an economic hub connecting the East and South-east Asian sub-regions with Central and West Asian regions to tap the economic, energy and natural resource complementarities. On the other hand, China is actively present in major sectors of significance be it in South Asia, East and South-East Asia or Central Asia. Similar, is the case in terms of economic presence of China in Africa and Latin America / Caribbean. Moreover, India and China interact closely in BRICS, AIIB, G-20 and in climate change negotiations and at the WTO.

    It is this wider canvas, in which India-China economic engagements need to be painted. Nevertheless, India cannot wish away deeper economic cooperation with the US and major economies in the EU. May be new efforts for a new global reconfiguration is needed that includes Japan, United States, Russia, India and China (JURIC) which sets a new global economic order along with the EU. If at all, India-China economic engagements need to be constructed in this new economic ambience.


    http://www.eurasiareview.com/22052015-india-china-economic-engagements-in-a-global-context-analysis/
     
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  3. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    China finally agrees to import buffalo meat from India
    Making China agree for direct import of bovine meat from India has been a top priority for Indian government since Narendra Modi government took over in May 2014.

    Written by Liz Mathew | New Delhi | Updated: January 16, 2017 6:33 am
    [​IMG]Officials said China has been buying Indian beef from Vietnam in the last few years and New Delhi was not getting any advantages in terms of changing the bilateral trade.

    China has finally agreed to remove restrictions on beef export from India. A top official in the Commerce ministry said Beijing, which has sent quality inspection team to India earlier to examine buffalo meat facilities, has cleared 14 abattoirs for importing meat from here. Making China agree for direct import of bovine meat from India has been a top priority for Indian government since Narendra Modi government took over in May 2014.

    Officials said China has been buying Indian beef from Vietnam in the last few years and New Delhi was not getting any advantages in terms of changing the bilateral trade. Sources said Ministry hopes that the export of beef would make a considerable change in the bilateral trade deficit. India’s trade deficit with China increased to $52.69 billion in 2015-16 from $48.48 billion in the previous financial year.

    “We have been lobbying hard to make China agree on importing buffalo meat directly from India. Chinese traders were using Vietnam for channelling their meat trade and Vietnam’s buffalo meat import has gone up more than its consumption,” said the official. Vietnam is the number one destination for India’s buffalo meat export and in 2013-14 it was 5,24,370 MT and it rose to 633800.24 MT in 2014-15.

    China signed an MoU for importing bovine meat from India in 2013 during Premier Li Keqiang’s visit, but has not lifted the restrictions yet. “After moving at a very slow pace, finally they have cleared 14 centres for its import. This is a positive move and we hope once the restrictions are over, they will clear more centres. Indian buffalo meat – mainly of water buffalo – is considered to be cost competitive and much better quality than what’s exported from countries like Brazil,” said the official. The country has exported 13,14,158.05 MT of buffalo meat products to the world for the worth of, Rs 2,6681.56 crore and the main export destinations are Malaysia, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Iraq apart from Vietnam.

    With the world’s largest population, China’s consumption of meat has been rising. According to the NGO WildAid, Chinese would consume nearly half of world’s beef by 2030. It also says the average Chinese eats around 170 g of meat per day, up from less than 30 g in 1978. “Its a huge market for India. We have been working really hard on it,” added the official. Last year, Beijing has lifted a 13-year complete ban on import of beef from the US.

    After Prime Minister Modi’s visit to China in May 2015, the matter was raised by New Delhi following which China had agreed to send its quality inspectors to see if Indian slaughter houses adhere to the required quality norms. The joint statement issued after Modi’s visit, has said that both sides will take necessary measures to remove impediments to bilateral trade.
     
  4. Project Dharma

    Project Dharma Senior Member Senior Member

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    :doh: Great idea, yay global warming.
     
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  5. Hemu Vikram Aditya

    Hemu Vikram Aditya Regular Member

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    china would run out of fresh water till 2030s then
     
  6. Project Dharma

    Project Dharma Senior Member Senior Member

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    They'll just import the beef and spoil the rest of the planet for people. They themselves are willing to live in a smog choked shithole.
     
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  7. Hemu Vikram Aditya

    Hemu Vikram Aditya Regular Member

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    china should import more citrus fruits and vegetables like tomatoes and should import water
     
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  8. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Actually importing food = importing water
     
  9. Hemu Vikram Aditya

    Hemu Vikram Aditya Regular Member

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    How so?
    ...........................
     
  10. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Think about the water needed to grow all those agri products.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Hemu Vikram Aditya

    Hemu Vikram Aditya Regular Member

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    But still you would get food you should concentrate on fresh water more rather than giving aid to pak however you need to import water
     
  12. I am otm shank

    I am otm shank Regular Member

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    seems more like a smart ploy to cut India's direct economic involvement with Vietnam and turning China into the middleman for indian bovine products which would further hurt India's economic expansion in its strongest industry, agriculture.

    After India's other market find alternative sources it could easily source beef from south America or Africa with investment that would give them control over the source unlike in India

    from being in business I know the closest and most valued relationships outside blood family is of those who you make money with. this will be a negative to indian foreign policy and make it harder to ally with Vietnam
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2017
  13. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Did u really read the post???


    The export of Indian beef to China has been ongoing for years,
    but by means of "transhipping” via Vietnam == in the disguise of "VIETNAM BEEF". Smuggling into China through Vietnam has been vampant of many products due to porous borders. Now opening of direct export of bovine meat would drop the middle-man out for the good of end sellers/buyers, and easing trade imbalance

    Your weird logic .... phewwwwwwww "a negative to indian foreign policy and make it harder to ally with Vietnam" :facepalm:

    Or just your routine of "opposing for opposing's sake"??
     
  14. Hemu Vikram Aditya

    Hemu Vikram Aditya Regular Member

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    Chinese are doing their best to support pakistan and in turn loot it
    And India is doing this with Vietnam But the difference here is India is not trying to loot it
     
  15. I am otm shank

    I am otm shank Regular Member

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    do you understand what a middleman is or is your English that poor? regardless of who the product eventually gets used by it will cut direct vietnamese and Indian economic involvement

    I'm sure China would greatly invite all indian products to go through their system but it's not a beneficial for India regardless if it's 'smuggled' to China eventually.

    trade imbalance would decrease with its chinese account but it would decrease export to Vietnam.

    If chinese would stop raising hegemonic objections to India selling military equipment to viets with regard to military equipment maybe it would be beneficial to put more of India's eggs on the Chinese basket since other sectors would see growth
     
  16. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Oh? A Canadian is teaching Inglish here?? :bs:

    Your logic is going down the drain again. How would that beef "smuggling" from Vietnam be sustainable, once the border surveillance is up and runnin?

    Here's an example- Smuggled rice worth $28 million seized in China
    With diminished Vietnamese involvement in between, the net export of Indian beef is going to increase thanks to reduced costs + proper quarantine.

    Viets themselves can't afford your holy cows, believe me I visited VN before.

    As for India selling military equipment to viets == hey wake up man! Viets would rather buy quality Russian arms or American than Indian anyday.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2017
  17. IndianHawk

    IndianHawk Senior Member Senior Member

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    They will buy what they can afford within their budget.

    If everyone simply thought of quality no one would ever buy anything Chinese:hehe:
     

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