In 65 years, India excels Pakistan in many fields

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by Kshatriya87, Mar 3, 2014.

  1. Kshatriya87

    Kshatriya87 Senior Member Senior Member

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    An old but interesting article. Most of these facts are already known to our members, still fun to read. Jai Hind !


    LAHORE: Although the Islamic Republic of Pakistan is a day older than its next-door neighbour India, it cannot match the excellence of its nuclear arch rival when it comes to the secular state’s accomplishments in political, educational, economic and communication development fronts during these 65 years.

    A few pro-Pakistan critics may, however, try to snatch the credit away from India by attributing the country’s superb successes to its much bigger area and its six times larger population.

    Well, there is no doubt that the total Indian area of 3,287,263 square kilometers is 4.12 times larger than Pakistan’s 796,095 square kilometres and there is no denying the fact that the current Indian population of 1.205 billion is roughly six times larger than the 190.29 million Pakistani populace, but these worthy critics should also know that the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of India is about 8 times healthier than that of Pakistan!

    A comparative study conducted by “The News International” in this context shows that Pakistan’s GDP rests at a paltry $210.6 billion, as compared to the relatively massive Indian GDP of $1.676 trillion. The writer has based his analysis from latest figures taken from the American Central Investigation Agency’s World Fact Book 2012, updated IMF reports and recent World Bank research papers

    These latest July 2012 numbers further reveal that Pakistan’s GDP per capita is $2,800, while that of India is $3,700.

    But then hiding behind the curtain of excuses won’t help the cause as most European nations with much smaller areas and populations have outgrown both Pakistan and India in terms of progress and human development during the last six-and-a-half decades-especially if we take into account the fact that most of these countries were completely destroyed during the Second World War.

    India may be the 30th most indebted nation in the world with an External Debt of $267.1 billion, much higher than Pakistan’s $61.83 billion to make it the 54th most indebted nation though, but the quantum of Indian exports today stands at $298.2 billion-way higher than Pakistan’s export figures of $25.35 billion.

    India is today the 21st largest exporter in the world, while Pakistan stands 68th in this list. With a mammoth labour force of 487.6 million (2nd largest in the world), a lot higher than Pakistan’s working brigade of 58.41 million, India today has the 7th largest foreign exchange and gold reserves of $345.8 billion.

    In comparison, Pakistan’s Foreign Exchange and Gold reserves rest at just $17.02 billion-or 62nd highest in the world.

    Indian’s current budget expenditures stand at $308.8 billion, while those of Pakistan are as dismal as $39.77 billion.

    On the communication network front, India is again miles ahead of Pakistan.India has 35.09 million telephones installed countrywide (9th highest in the world), as compared to Pakistan’s numbers of 3.419 million (46th highest in the world).

    The number of cell phones in India is 752 million (2nd highest in the world), while Pakistan has 111 million cell phones only, though this figure is still high enough to make latter the 9th largest mobile phone using country across the planet. The number of Indian Internet users is 61.338 million (6th in the world), while the number of Pakistani Internet users is just 20.431 million or 20th in the world.

    With 352 paved and unpaved airports, India is ranked 22nd in the world, while Pakistan features 37th in this list with 151 airports.

    The Indian rail network spans over 63,974 kilometres in the world to make it the 4th largest in the world, while Pakistan’s total network is just 7,791 kilometres (27th largest on Earth).

    This is how the CIA World Fact Book 2012 has commented on Pakistan’s unhappy state of affairs: “Decades of internal political disputes and low levels of foreign investment have led to slow growth and underdevelopment in Pakistan. Agriculture accounts for more than one-fifth of output and two-fifths of employment. Textiles account for most of Pakistan’s export earnings, and Pakistan’s failure to expand a viable export base for other manufactures has left the country vulnerable to shifts in world demand. Official unemployment is 6 per cent, but this fails to capture the true picture, because much of the economy is informal and underemployment remains high. Over the past few years, low growth and high inflation, led by a spurt in food prices, have increased the amount of poverty - the UN Human Development Report estimated poverty in 2011 at almost 50 per cent of the population.”

    It added saying: “Pakistan must address long standing issues related to government revenues and energy production in order to spur the amount of economic growth that will be necessary to employ its growing population. Other long term challenges include expanding investment in education and healthcare, and reducing dependence on foreign donors.”

    About India, the CIA World Fact Book 2012 has viewed: “India’s medium-term growth outlook is positive due to a young population and corresponding low dependency ratio, healthy savings and investment rates, and increasing integration into the global economy. India has many long-term challenges that it has not yet fully addressed, including widespread poverty, inadequate physical and social infrastructure, limited non-agricultural employment opportunities, scarce access to quality basic and higher education, and accommodating rural-to-urban migration.”

    It has gone on to write a few more good things about India: “Despite pressing problems such as significant overpopulation, environmental degradation, extensive poverty, and widespread corruption, rapid economic development is fueling India’s rise on the world stage.” As far as the democratic achievements of both these countries of the same age are concerned, India again stands much taller than Pakistan.

    India has seen 15 Lok Sabha (Lower House of Parliament) election stints taking place in 1951, 1957, 1962, 1967, 1971, 1977, 1980, 1984-85, 1989, 1991, 1996, 1998, 1999, 2004 and 2009, meaning thereby that the Indian public has been electing its representatives every 4.33 years on an average since the last 65 years.

    On the contrary, Pakistanis have exercised their right of franchise just nine times (the 1985 party-less polls included) during the same corresponding period, which thus signifies that the Pakistani citizens have gone to cast their ballot after every 7.22 years on an average.

    If regularity of general elections in any country is deemed a vital yardstick by which the strength of democracy in any part of the world is measured by political scientists, then India has had a much smoother sailing than Pakistan.

    It is imperative to note that two of these nine election stints in Pakistan—-1985 and 2002—- have been held under the supervision of General Zia-ul-Haq and General Pervez Musharraf, while both dictators were clad in khakis. The February 2008 polls were overseen by Musharraf when he wasn’t donning an army uniform.It goes without saying that he was still calling shots as the country’s elected president.

    General Musharraf had resigned from military on November 28, 2007, paving way for the incumbent General Kayani to assume charge as Chief of Army Staff.By the way, between 1947 and 1958, no direct elections were held in Pakistan at the national level.

    The volatility of Pakistani politics in its early days can be gauged from the fact that from the date of first Premier Liaquat Ali Khan’s murder on October 16, 1951 till the imposition of the first Martial Law on October 7, 1958, not fewer than six Prime Ministers (Khawaja Nazimuddin, Muhammad Ali Bogra, Chaudhary Muhammad Ali, Huseyn Shaheed Suharawardy, I.I. Chundrigar and Feroze Khan Noon) had held the country’s reins!! Before concluding this story and still talking of the cruelty of the Indo-Pak politics, it is worth recalling that overall, four premiers on either side of the border-two each from Pakistan and India- have been assassinated till date.

    While Indian Premiers Indira Gandhi (1984) and her son Rajiv Gandhi (1991) had died unnatural deaths, the first Pakistani Premier Liaquat Ali Khan (1951) and then Benazir Bhutto (2007) had also met the same fate.

    Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, an elected Pakistani Prime Minister and also the President once, was hanged to death on Supreme Court’s orders in 1979.

    Another sitting Pakistani President, General Zia-ul-Haq, had perished in a mysterious plane disaster in August 1988.

    We all know that Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, popularly known as “Father of the Nation” in India, was the first of all known Pak-India politicians to be shot dead while he was walking to address a prayer meeting on January 30, 1948.

    And not to forget, Sahibzada Sayyid Iskander Ali Mirza, the first Pakistani President and the man behind the imposition of the first martial law in the country in 1958, had died during his long exile in London on November 12, 1969.

    He was sadly denied a burial in Pakistan by the then President Yahya Khan.

    One can thus safely assume after looking at the afore-mentioned historical facts that Pakistan has certainly scored a few points more than India, when it comes to the bloody nature of its politics.

    There could be a host of reasons for Indian excellence in many fields over Pakistan, but perhaps the most important reason amongst all is their focus on educating their population.

    A quick look at facts listed below, sourced from Unesco and World Bank, highlight how Indians have better educated themselves than Pakistan.

    1. India, despite a population 6 times that of Pakistan had fewer or just 3 million out-of-school children at Primary level in 2010, compared to some 7.0 million in Pakistan.

    2. Net Primary School Enrollment in India is 92.1 per cent, whereas it is just about 70 per cent in Pakistan

    3. Primary completion rate in India, both for males and females is 95 per cent, whereas the same for Pakistan is only 67 per cent for males and under 60 per cent for females.

    4. India spends over 3 per cent of its GDP on education, while Pakistan barely spends under 2 per cent.

    5. Adult literacy rate in India is approx 63 per cent; in Pakistan it is just about 55 per cent.

    6. Youth literacy in India is 81 per cent. Pakistan: just 71 per cent.

    7. Female literacy rate in India is 50 per cent; it is less than 40 per cent in Pakistan.

    8. Indian scientists excel in areas of defence technology, space research, electronics and avionics, genetics, banking and telecommunications. India produces 10,000 PhDs every year, about 4,000 of these in the faculties of science and technology alone. Pakistan produces just about 800 PhDs altogether.

    9. India produces more PhDs every year than Pakistan has produced in the last 20 years.



    In 65 years, India excels Pakistan in many fields - thenews.com.pk
     
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  3. Jagdish58

    Jagdish58 Regular Member

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    I think it is not fair Comparison , India should compare itself with China, Japan , EU & the US instead of Pakis
     
  4. Vishwarupa

    Vishwarupa Senior Member Senior Member

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    Its a shame to compare ourselves with pakistan.

    Its an insult. i request admins to remove this thread from the forum.
     
  5. Free Karma

    Free Karma Senior Member Senior Member

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    Why are we comparing ourselves to Pakistan?
     
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  6. Kshatriya87

    Kshatriya87 Senior Member Senior Member

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    I know buddy. But it is not us comparing with Pakistan. It is one of the pakis who has written this article. Also, I needed to shut "Neo's" mouth.
     
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  7. Kshatriya87

    Kshatriya87 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Again, we are not comparing. I just wanted to show that a pakistani has written this article. They are comparing. At least there is someone over there who knows better.
     
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  8. Neo

    Neo Senior Member Senior Member

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    India ranks 65 out of 79 nations on the Global Hunger Index (GHI) and what’s worse, it has remained on the same position for the last 12 years. In further shame, even war-torn Rwanda fares better.

    Prople living in extreme poverty in India exceed the total population of Pakistan. Actual figures of people living in poverty is 2.5 times higher than official figure and large parts of the country are less developped and poorer than sub saharan countries.

    Yes, you should not be comparing yourself with Pakistan.
     
  9. Neo

    Neo Senior Member Senior Member

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    Poverty in India 2.5 times the official figure: study
    Press Trust of India
    Feb 20, 2014 21:28 (IST)


    "...we find that 56 per cent of the population lacks the means to meet their essential needs. By this measure, some 680 million Indians experience deprivation - more than 2.5 times the population of 270 million below the official poverty line."


    Poverty in India 2.5 times the official figure: study
     
  10. Kshatriya87

    Kshatriya87 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Guess who ranks among the top failed nations. FAILED. End of Discussion.
     
  11. Neo

    Neo Senior Member Senior Member

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    "...we find that 56 per cent of the population lacks the means to meet their essential needs. By this measure, some 680 million Indians experience deprivation - more than 2.5 times the population of 270 million below the official poverty line."

    This is enough proof to define a failed nation indeed.
    Goog day!
     
  12. Jagdish58

    Jagdish58 Regular Member

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    Bro you can't shut a gramaphone:taunt1: he will comment like 1 pakistani = 5 Indians:lol::scared2::taunt1:
     
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  13. Neo

    Neo Senior Member Senior Member

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    Truth hurts, doesn't it? :)
     
  14. Jagdish58

    Jagdish58 Regular Member

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    Never if 1 Paki = 5 Indians was true , Whole Kashmir would have been under Pakis may be even delhi( Radio pakistan delhi) & East pakistan would have never broken in 1971 & 90,000 sorry soldiers would have never surrendered:lol:

    Truth hurts terrorist not us:lol::thumb:
     
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  15. thethinker

    thethinker Senior Member Senior Member

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    Yep, truth hurts. :thumb:

    Is Pakistan sinking? - DAWN.COM

    THE question of Pakistan’s viability as a state is at least as old as the country itself. Recently a sobering article written by a former American ambassador to Pakistan has reignited the question and left many wondering whether Pakistan’s “long-term trajectory is toward failure”. The ambassador belongs to the camp that sees Pakistan as moving inexorably towards failure, and urges the world community and regional neighbours to start “thinking about the political and strategic implications of an accelerated decline toward state failure” in the nuclear-armed country.

    The next day, on the same pages of the same newspaper, there appeared another article on the same theme. This one written by Michael Krepon, cofounder of the Stimson Centre, focused more specifically on Pakistan’s growing nuclear arsenal.

    “A nuclear arsenal built on very weak economic foundations is inherently unstable,” wrote Mr Krepon, arguing that strengthening Pakistan’s economy is inherently in India’s interest, and the best way to accomplish this is through increasing bilateral trade and investment between the two neighbours.

    The concerns expressed by both authors are old, but not outdated. If anything, both articles are reminders that amidst the chaos and flux of a rapidly evolving moment, amidst the heady excitement of the first truly democratic transfer of power that Pakistan is undergoing, old concerns regarding the eventual viability of the state not only continue to linger, but are growing in urgency.

    Connected to the question of long-term viability is the matter of Pakistan’s enduring resilience. Another way of asking the same question, therefore, is not “how will Pakistan survive?” but rather “how has Pakistan survived?” The two questions are intimately linked.

    Pakistan has survived due to its rich natural endowments. These include water and gas. Allow me to explain.

    Pakistan is built around a river system, a hydraulic society so to speak. The rich water endowment means a flourishing agriculture forms the base not just of the economy, but the entire system of livelihoods that holds the country together.

    Contrary to what the ambassador says in a small parenthetical comment in his piece, Pakistan is not “glued by the army” but it is held together by its agriculture.

    Having seen Pakistan’s economy up close for many years now, I’m struck by how large a role agriculture plays. Every year, the land throws up its rich harvest on two occasions: the cotton crop which starts coming in during August, and the wheat crop which is harvested from April onwards.

    Both these crops are big enough to make the country a player in global markets. Both employ a labour force so massive that during their harvesting, industry leaders complain that the cities get emptied out and labour becomes a scarcity.

    Both crops have large and significant industries built upon them, whether transport and storage, or processing. In the case of cotton, Pakistan’s largest employer — the textile industry — grows atop the bountiful harvest.

    Both crops are huge players in the country’s credit markets, whether formal or informal. The size of the commodity operations that support the wheat procurement drive compares favourably with other enormous heads in the government’s budget, like power subsidies. And the textile sector, which is an extension of the cotton crop, is the country’s largest private sector consumer of bank credit.

    The size of the commodity chains that are built around each crop, from the upstream fertiliser and pesticides sector to tractors and tube wells, to the marketing and distribution infrastructure and the labour force requirements in not only the harvest itself but the transport and marketing and distribution, are so huge that they form the backbone of the country and its economy.

    The scale of the activity that gets under way every year when the harvest comes in is large enough to employ a labour force estimated to be more than 55 million people.

    Couple this with the natural gas reserves that have fuelled our industry, and fired our stoves and ovens and geysers and served as feedstock in our fertiliser industry.

    Today Pakistan is shielded from the full impact of hundred dollar oil because domestic gas accounts for almost half of the country’s primary energy consumption. The only sector that has had to largely absorb the costs of hundred dollar oil is the power sector, and the circular debt is testament to the enormous destruction that high oil prices have brought with them.

    Pakistan is built on nature’s bounties, far more than anything else. Here lies the secret of the country’s ‘resilience’, its capacity to bounce back, to muddle through.

    No matter what the provocation — earthquake, floods, war, sanctions, recession — the arrival of the harvest twice a year gets the wheels moving, money starts to circulate, and an army of farmers and day labourers and brokers and stockists and middlemen and moneylenders and truck drivers begins to articulate itself, imperfectly mediated by another army of petty officialdom, and often gorged upon by large landowners and their connections in high levels of government.

    Having seen all this with my own eyes, I must confess I’m not as troubled by the growth of the militancy and the bombings as I am by watching this natural endowment begin to erode away.

    Pakistan’s natural gas is running out, and our food security — the backbone of the country’s resilience — is now in question, driven by growing water scarcities and deep dysfunctions in the agrarian economy.

    The militancy and the extremism can be swept aside once their lifeline of support from within the state itself is cut off, and once the forces of mainstream economy and politics begin to assert themselves.

    Without under the table support from certain sections of the state itself, militancy and extremism will suffocate in this environment, and the ballot box will assign them their true place in our society, like it always has.

    But getting the forces of mainstream economy and politics to articulate themselves properly, especially in the face of the growing scarcities that are coming our way, is the real challenge.

    The writer is a Karachi-based journalist covering business and economic policy.
     
  16. Neo

    Neo Senior Member Senior Member

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  17. PredictablyMalicious

    PredictablyMalicious Punjabi Senior Member

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    can mods ban this moron @Neo? He is ruining every thread
     
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  18. Neo

    Neo Senior Member Senior Member

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    My message to you, delusional hindutva hatemongers is that people living in glass houses should not throw stones.

    Go collect more garbage on the net and feel good about your own failed nation.

    Good day!
     
  19. praneetbajpaie

    praneetbajpaie Tihar Jail Banned

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    Oh Neo, yes we are poor but you are worse.

    I searched Pakistani patients in India, this was the result

    News Package - Hasnain Departs For Treatment in India - YouTube

    India opens its doors for sick Pakistani child - YouTube

    and many more.

    Then I searched for Indian patients in Pakistan, this was the result, lol

    indian patients in pakistan - YouTube

    Yes we are poor, but your countrymen and women are still coming to this country to get basic medical treatment which are not available in your country.

    Stop watching our films and stop listening to our music and stop idolizing our superstars and then maybe we can take you guys seriously.

    Stop PCB from begging BCCI in letting your players play in the IPL

    Stop your actors from begging for roles in Indian films

    then we can take you seriously. Otherwise, lol,,,
     
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  20. Jagdish58

    Jagdish58 Regular Member

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    We are proud to be Hindus & Indians , not the terrorist like Pakis who are getting bombarded by their own brain child TTP:lol::thumb:

    You calling India a failed nation is like Somalia calling US a failed nation:lol:

    But be happy with your wildest imagination:thumb::lol:
     
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  21. thethinker

    thethinker Senior Member Senior Member

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    Failed nation indeed. :rolleyes:

    India and Pakistan’s GDP have diverged sharply in the past decade.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     

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