IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at IIMs

Discussion in 'Foreign Relations' started by hello_10, May 14, 2013.

  1. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,880
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    unconfirmed
    IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at IIMs

    BANGALORE/NEW DELHI: As India plays catch-up with its bigger Asian neighbour China, Mandarin has emerged as a popular course at some of the IIMs. One of them, IIM Bangalore (IIMB), says Indian students cannot afford to be left behind as the two countries compete in every sphere of economic activity. "Realisation has dawned that our future business lies with China and we cannot be left behind if we have to make a mark on the world economic stage," said professor S Swaminathan who teaches Business Chinese — Language Course at IIM-B. :china:

    The Chinese business course helps students carry out day-to-day conversations on a vocabulary base of 550 words. The teaching lays stress on pronunciation of syllables as Chinese is a tonal language and is taught through the medium of PINYIN (Romanised way of learning Chinese). "The onus is on India to compete with China in every sphere of economic activity. We have a lot to learn from the Chinese module of economic growth and become really competitive in world business activity. :china: In fact, neighboring countries like Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Myanmar have more Chinese participation in their respective economies, whereas we have been slow," said the professor.

    Spoken Chinese (Mandarin) was first introduced for the batch of 2011-2013 in the second year. It is a letter-grading course, where the professor uses 'Excellent', 'Good' and 'Unsatisfactory'. Scores are added to the student's CGPA (Cumulative Grade Point Average).

    Around 44 students from the 2013 batch opted for Mandarin, said Swaminathan, out of a class of 381. This year's numbers are not available as the second year students (batch 2012-2014) are yet to pick their 5th semester electives. IIM Ahmedabad, too, has included Mandarin in the 5th semester but a response from the institute is awaited. IIM Calcutta has begun offering Mandarin in the last two years along with courses in French, Spanish or German. Students are awarded a certificate of completion on clearing tests and a final exam, but no scores are added to the CGPA. In the last three years, IIM Calcutta has seen its peak batch sizes doubling from 40-45 three years ago to 80-85 in January 2013 for foreign languages.

    NOT MANY TAKERS

    But not all IIMs agree that introducing a language course as an elective will have many takers. Specially, if it is a language like Mandarin which is tough to learn, forget master. "During a downturn, a student would rather take another marketing or finance course than a language course as an elective. In 30 hours, one cannot learn Mandarin which requires learning how to speak, write and read to gain enough fluency, unlike many Western languages," said G Venkat Raman, professor, business ethics at IIM Kozhikode who learnt Mandarin from Peking University a few years ago.

    Two years ago, he floated the idea of a course titled 'Doing Business In Emerging Markets — Insights from China' but it had no takers. But IIM Bangalore justifies the course saying software professionals, engineering graduates and businessmen looking to improve business opportunities have started learning Chinese. "Month-on-month, the trade traffic between India and China has been growing steadily and appreciably. Hence the need to effectively communicate in Chinese," said Swaminathan.

    Knowing a language helps during placements — the final goal for many students. Vinod Babu Sangana, a student of IIM Indore, had taken up French for a year, although it was not part of his curriculum. He got placed with Capgemini as a senior consultant and says it will help him during his onsite operations. "In the interview, I was asked how well versed I am with the language and how much I can interact in it," said Sangana.

    Some of the IIMs have attempted tie-ups with colleges in China through student exchange programmes. For its one-year executive MBA programme, IIM Shillong has formed an alliance with Ocean University China though a programme called "Understanding China — Business and Culture". :thumb: For companies, a candidate knowing a foreign language is always a plus. "At Bain, a working knowledge of the relevant foreign language can indeed be a big leg-up for a consultant to succeed away from his or her home market," said Nikhil Prasad Ojha, a consulting partner who oversees HR for Bain India.

    IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at B-schools - The Economic Times
     
  2.  
  3. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,880
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    unconfirmed
    Re: IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at II

    duplicate post
     
  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Re: IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at II

    Start saying 'Ni Hao' and feel that you are in Bali Hai!

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
    W.G.Ewald likes this.
  5. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Re: IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at II

    Start saying 'Ni Hao' and feel that you are in Bali Hai!

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  6. LurkerBaba

    LurkerBaba Staff Administrator

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    6,769
    Likes Received:
    3,678
    Location:
    India
    Re: IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at II

    Indians will learn English and Mandarin, but no foreigner needs to learn any Indian language
     
  7. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2011
    Messages:
    14,140
    Likes Received:
    8,528
    Location:
    North Carolina, USA
    Re: IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at II

    Does every Indian child learn English in school?
     
  8. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,880
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    unconfirmed
    Re: IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at II


    its now widely accepted that Indian kids would have more commands on the Mandarin, along with english as this language is still not dead yet........

    along with the main news of this thread, the news as below does confirm the growing awareness in world about Mandarin, as the world is really changing :thumb:

     
    Last edited: May 17, 2013
  9. Payeng

    Payeng Daku Mongol Singh

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2009
    Messages:
    2,521
    Likes Received:
    767
    Location:
    Neistan
    Re: IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at II

    Why not first of all knowing the language can cover up any communication gap that might that might arise while dealing in a business transaction, I have a S. Korean friend here in India who have been hired by a (IT) company to deal with S. Korean market not because he have contacts in his home country but because it is easy for the company to do with some one who knows the language,

    secondly who know he might get a job in RAW's SIGINT division :troll:
     
  10. Snuggy321

    Snuggy321 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2012
    Messages:
    506
    Likes Received:
    238
    Re: IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at II

    Any half way decent school in India teaches English since you are pretty much lost without it.
     
  11. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,880
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    unconfirmed
    Re: IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at II

    Is English or Mandarin the language of the future?
    22 February 2012

    English has been the dominant global language for a century, but is it the language of the future? If Mandarin Chinese is to challenge English globally, then it first has to conquer its own backyard, South East Asia.


    In Malaysia's southernmost city of Johor Bahru, the desire to speak good English has driven some children to make a remarkable two-hour journey to school every day.

    Nine-year-old Aw Yee Han hops on a yellow mini van at 04:30. His passport is tucked inside a small pouch hung around his neck.

    This makes it easier for him to show it to immigration officials when he reaches the Malaysian border.

    His school is located on the other side, in Singapore, where unlike in Malaysia, English is the main language.

    It's not your typical school run, but his mother, Shirley Chua thinks it's worth it.

    "Science and maths are all written in English so it's essential for my son to be fluent in the language," she says.

    An estimated 15,000 students from southern Johor state make the same bus journey across the border every day. It may seem like a drastic measure, but some parents don't trust the education system in Malaysia - they worry that the value of English is declining in the country.

    Since independence from the British in 1957, the country has phased out schools that teach in English. By the early 1980s, most students were learning in the national language of Malay.

    As a result, analysts say Malaysian graduates became less employable in the IT sector.

    "We've seen a drastic reduction in the standard of English in our country, not just among the students but I think among the teachers as well," says political commentator Ong Kian Ming.

    Those who believe that English is important for their children's future either send their kids to expensive private schools or to Singapore, where the government has been credited as being far-sighted for adopting the language of its former colonial master.

    Nearly three-quarters of the population in Singapore are ethnic Chinese but English is one of the national languages and very widely-spoken.

    Many believe that this has helped the city state earn the title of being the easiest place to do business, by the World Bank.

    However, the dominance of English is now being challenged by the rise of China in Singapore.

    The Singapore Chinese Chamber Institute of Business has added Chinese classes for business use in recent years.

    Students are being taught in Mandarin rather than the Hokkien dialect spoken by the older Chinese immigrants.

    These courses have proved popular, ever since the government began providing subsidies for Singaporeans to learn Chinese in 2009 during the global financial crisis.

    "The government pushed to provide them with an opportunity to upgrade themselves so as to prepare themselves for the economic upturn," says chamber spokesperson Alwyn Chia. :thumb:

    Some businesses are already desperate for Chinese speakers.

    Lee Han Shih, who runs a multimedia company, says English is becoming less important to him financially because he is taking western clients to do business in China.
    :ranger:

    "So obviously you need to learn English but you also need to know Chinese," says Mr Lee. :thumb:

    As China's economic power grows, Mr Lee believes that Mandarin will overtake English. In fact, he has already been seeing hints of this.

    "The decline of the English language probably follows the decline of the US dollar.

    "If the renminbi is becoming the next reserve currency then you have to learn Chinese." :china:

    More and more, he says, places like Brazil and China are doing business in the renminbi, not the US dollar, so there is less of a need to use English.
    Bilingualism

    Indeed, China's clout is growing in South East Asia, becoming the region's top trading partner.

    But to say that Mandarin will rival English is a "bit of a stretch", says Manoj Vohra, Asia director at the Economist Intelligence Unit.

    Even companies in China, who prefer to operate in Chinese, are looking for managers who speak both Mandarin and English if they want to expand abroad, he says.

    "They tend to act as their bridges."

    So the future of English is not a question of whether it will be overtaken by Mandarin, but whether it will co-exist with Chinese, says Vohra.

    He believes bilingualism will triumph in South East Asia.

    It is a sound economic argument, but in Vietnam's case, there is resistance to learning Mandarin.

    The country may share a border with China, but the Vietnamese government's choice to not emphasise Mandarin is an emotional one, says leading economist Le Dang Doanh.

    "All the streets in Vietnam are named according to generals and emperors that have been fighting against the Chinese invasion for 2000 years," he says.

    Tensions flared up again last May over the disputed waters of the South China Sea.

    Anti-Chinese sentiment means that young Vietnamese are choosing to embrace English - the language of a defeated enemy. Many families still bear the psychological scars from the Vietnam War with the United States.

    Yet there is no animosity towards English because the founding father of Vietnam, Ho Chi Minh, made a clear distinction between the so-called American imperialists who were bombarding Vietnam and the American people, says Le Dang Doanh.

    Many Vietnamese who have lost family members during the war are now studying in America, he says.

    "We never forget any victim in the past but in order to industrialise and normalise a country, Vietnam needs to speak English."

    The Vietnamese government has an ambitious goal to ensure all young people leaving school by 2020 will have a good grasp of the English language.

    But it's not hard for young Vietnamese to accept English. For some, the language offers a sense of freedom in Vietnam, where the one-party communist state retains a tight grip on all media.

    In a public square in central Hanoi, a group of young men are break-dancing to the pulsing beats of western hip hop. Ngoc Tu, 20, says he only listens to English music.

    "The Ministry of Culture has banned a lot of [Vietnamese] songs and any cultural publications that refer to freedom or rebellion but... English songs are not censored."

    It is debatable whether English or Mandarin will dominate in South East Asia in the future. There are arguments for both on the economic front.

    But culturally, there is no dispute.

    Even Mandarin language enthusiasts like Singaporean businessman Mr Lee, says that English will remain popular so long as Hollywood exists.

    The success of movies such as Kung Fu Panda, an American production about a Chinese animal, has caused a lot of anxiety in China, he says.

    There have been many cartoons in China about pandas before, but none had reached commercial success, says Mr Lee.

    "The moment Kung Fu Panda hit the cinemas everybody watched it. They bought the merchandise and they learned English."

    BBC News - Is English or Mandarin the language of the future?
     
  12. roma

    roma NRI in Europe Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2009
    Messages:
    3,247
    Likes Received:
    1,861
    Re: IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at II

    not only mandarin but i believe indian student are well capable of learning many other languages eg japanese, russian , spanish, titalian - the list goes on

    no harm for those who feel they have knack for learning mandarin just as no harm and a positive step also to learn any other european language or Japanese
     
  13. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,880
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    unconfirmed
    Re: IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at II

    Mandarin, the future's Language for Employment

    Its clear from the article of my last post#10 also that Mandarin is now very likely to replace english as the language which will provide employment in future. China is going to be the economic center of the world, chinese companies, along with those companies who are either based in China or aligned with China, are now looking for those people who have a level of command on Mandarin. and hence, having a level of fluency on this language is a need of time........

    the above post #10 of mine also clear that we are now going to have Yuan as the world currency, highly likely, which is accepted by many world leaders as below too. and it again has the same meaning for Mandarin also, accept it as the World Language now...... I think, Indian Middle Class would now prepare their kids considering the circumstances from 2025+ onward, and hence their Indian Kids would now have more command on Mandarin, in the same way as how they had English as language for employment in past. and yes, post#7 and the main article of this thread do confirm about growing awareness about this would be "World Language" in India :thumb:

    and yes, world is now messed up because of uncertainties with US$, it keep fluctuating on time to time. and we are very hopeful that China with over $3.4trillion Foreign Reserve will definitely help the World have a strong and established World Currency, the Yuan :china:


     
    Last edited: May 22, 2013
  14. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,880
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    unconfirmed
    Re: IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at II

    duplicate post
     
  15. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,880
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    unconfirmed
    Re: IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at II


    madam its not about learning a language, but its about the Asian Century, we are going to have from 2020+ onward, where we are likely to have Mandarin as the World Language, and Yuan as the World Currency, and Indian Middle Class need to prepare their kids for that time...........

    its all about getting employment through a World Language, Mandarin, which would replace English from 2020+, along with the home languages. with the fact that the Yuan as the World Currency, and companies based/aligned with the financial center China, and they would need the most competent people, and having competency on Mandarin will be equally valued as having command on your profession :thumb:
     
  16. roma

    roma NRI in Europe Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2009
    Messages:
    3,247
    Likes Received:
    1,861
    Re: IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at II

    sir, does any of what you wrote negate the efficacy of my initial point that we indians are talented in being able to learn any (almost ) language ? ....the obvious answer is that it does not

    so your initial statement that "its not about learning a language " is simply incongruent isn't it .
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2013
  17. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,880
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    unconfirmed
    Re: IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at II

    i just wanted to say that, its more about the growing status of Mandarin, the would be World Language from 2020+, and its more than just learning a language. its more about a subject in class 10th, like English we have in India right now, and a level of competency on this language would then be required to secure better employment from MNCs based in China from 2020/25+, as we hope :thumb:
     
  18. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,880
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    unconfirmed
    Re: IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at II

    Invest in the Chinese Yuan Before It Takes Over the Financial World
    May 7, 2013

    It's only a matter of time before the U.S. dollar loses its more than 50-year reign as the world's dominant reserve currency, and it will be replaced by the Chinese yuan.

    From January 2012-January 2013, transactions in yuan grew 171% in value, moving the yuan ahead of the Russian ruble to 13th place in global currency payments, up from 20th last year.

    And you can bet the yuan will soon crack the top 10. In March, yuan payments grew in value 32.7%, compared with a gain of only 5.1% across all currencies.

    Part of the reason for the yuan's growth is that at least half of all trade with emerging markets could be settled in yuan by 2013- 2015, which would be up from just 3% in 2010, according to HSBC. :china:

    For Money Morning readers, the rise of the yuan shouldn't be a surprise.

    For years, Money Morning Chief Investment Strategist Keith Fitz-Gerald has been warning investors about the yuan's emergence as a reserve currency and has suggested ways to prepare for its takeover.

    "It's the yuan's world - the West is just living in it, or borrowing from it, as the case may be," Fitz-Gerald said earlier this year. "Demand for the yuan is growing at such a staggering rate that your financial future will be built upon it."


    Chinese Yuan Outshines U.S. Dollar

    Since the U.S. went off the gold standard in 1971, the U.S. dollar has lost more than 80% of its value.

    In contrast, the yuan has risen over 25% against the dollar since June 2005.

    "China, with its 1.3 billion consumers and growing global influence, will be the clear winner of the brewing currency war," Fitz-Gerald said. "Right now, the yuan is a partially blocked currency, but that's changing very rapidly as the economic balance of power shifts east. And it will continue to shift for at least the next decade."

    By 2015, the yuan is expected to be a fully convertible currency and be trading freely from London. This will really shake up currency markets.

    "When the yuan truly steps onto the world's stage in 2015, the game will change forever because there will be a fourth currency that has enough liquidity to absorb global capital flows," Fitz-Gerald said. "The sacred triumvirate of the U.S. dollar, the yen and the euro will shatter."

    Some markets are already making the transition.

    In a deal announced last month, trade between China and Australia can now be done strictly between the yuan and the Australian dollar, whereas before units had to be exchanged in U.S. dollars. Before this new trade agreement, only the U.S. dollar and Japanese yen were directly exchangeable with the yuan.

    And the U.K, France, Russia, Brazil, and India all have some sort of bilateral agreements in placefor trading with the yuan - and Germany is now contemplating joining the crowd.

    So before the yuan takes over the financial world, how can investors prepare?


    How to Invest in the Yuan World Order

    There are several ways investors can profit as the yuan emerges as this century's leading reserve currency.

    The most obvious way is buying the yuan itself.

    This can be done directly by opening an EverBank Chinese Renminbi World Currency Access Deposit. It's IRA eligible and FDIC insured and there are no monthly account fees. You can open an account for as little as $10,000.

    Another way to invest in the yuan is through an ETF like the Wisdom Tree Dreyfus Chinese Yuan ETF (NYSE: CYB).

    Even though the yuan has climbed 25% against the dollar over the past eight years, Fitz-Gerald thinks its rise is just beginning.

    "Many people are tempted to think the yuan is all about the money itself," Fitz-Gerald noted. "But in reality, it's a byproduct of yet more trade growth outside traditional western trading channels and payments methods."

    Further Reading: For a more detailed look at how the yuan is going to affect your financial future, check out Fitz-Gerald's analysis: Why Your Financial Future Will Be Built Upon the Chinese Yuan.

    Invest in the Chinese Yuan Before It Takes Over the Financial World - Money Morning
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2013
  19. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,880
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    unconfirmed
    Re: IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at II

    double post
     
  20. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,880
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    unconfirmed
    Re: IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at II

    .
    =>

    The World's Most Widely Spoken Languages

    The Summer Institute for Linguistics (SIL) Ethnologue Survey (1999) lists the following as the top languages by population:
    (number of native speakers in parentheses)

    Chinese* (937,132,000) :china:

    Spanish (332,000,000)

    English (322,000,000)

    Bengali (189,000,000)

    Hindi (182,000,000)

    Arabic* (174,950,000)

    Portuguese (170,000,000)

    Russian (170,000,000)

    Japanese (125,000,000)

    German (98,000,000)

    French* (79,572,000)

    Most Widely Spoken Languages
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2013
  21. cloud

    cloud Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2012
    Messages:
    152
    Likes Received:
    67
    Location:
    India
    Re: IIMs' tryst with Chinese: Mandarin emerges as popular course at II

    I've no knowledge enough on this topic, But may be Japanese language can be better wrt to Indians, if there is good development in relations with Japan. @hello_10 please post your thoughts about this. Considering that Chinese are not reliable unless the border issue is resolved or even after that as you don't know when they again start claiming something else when they feel secure enough.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
    roma likes this.

Share This Page