IAI-DRDO Barak-II missile

Discussion in 'Strategic Forces' started by Dark Sorrow, Jun 14, 2009.

  1. Dark Sorrow

    Dark Sorrow Respected Member Senior Member

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    Source :
    Ares Homepage
     
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  3. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Have the development trials commenced for the missile?
    India will be serial producing this one is it?
     
  4. Dark Sorrow

    Dark Sorrow Respected Member Senior Member

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    Naval Barak-8

    Sorce :
    http://www.iai.co.il/34408-36713-en/default.aspx
     
  5. Dark Sorrow

    Dark Sorrow Respected Member Senior Member

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    New EL/M-2248 AESA and Barak-8 for India in the works

    Elta Systems begins building MF-STAR model

    Richard Scott

    Israel Aircraft Industries' (IAI's) Elta Systems group has begun building a single-face engineering development model of its new EL/M-2248 MF-STAR active array multifunction radar, with first transmission tests expected by the end of 2006.

    Developed from core technology employed in the EL/M- 2080 'Green Pine' ground-based L-band active array radar, MF-STAR is entering advanced engineering development for the Israel Navy. Senior naval sources told Jane's that the service has identified the system as its preferred surveillance, tracking and guidance radar for its projected next-generation surface combatant; it is also being proposed for the mid-life modernisation of the Israel Navy's three existing Saar 5 corvettes.

    Elta began privately funded development of the EL/M-2248 in 2000, leveraging experience in solid-state active array radar accrued from the 'Green Pine' programme and earlier experience from the Phalcon airborne early warning sensor.

    Operating in the E/F-band, MF-STAR uses four fixed-array faces based on a modular tile array architecture (each tile containing 16 Gallium Arsenide transmit/receive modules) to allow for scaleability in the size of the antenna aperture.

    Liquid cooling is used to dissipate heat at the array.

    According to Elta, MF-STAR uses pulse Doppler techniques, multiple beam forming and advanced high-PRF waveforms to extract stressing, low radar cross section threats even in conditions of heavy jamming and dense clutter. Key functionalities include three-dimensional volume search, missile horizon search, multi-target tracking, surface surveillance, helicopter detection, gunnery control and splash spotting.

    According to Elta, MF-STAR is able to initiate tracks against sea-skimming missiles at ranges in excess of 25 km, and out to more than 250 km for a high-flying combat aircraft. EL/M-2248 is also able to provide mid-course guidance for active or semi-active anti-aircraft missiles, and can slave illuminators for semi-active guided missiles.

    Weight reduction has been a key driver in the MF-STAR engineering programme. Array faces are scaleable according to performance requirements and platform constraints: a typical 3x3 m array weighs approximately 1,500 kg.

    Inboard equipment is installed in six cabinets; two for processing and four for the power supply. Total below decks weight is 900 kg.

    Although Elta declined to comment on customer or contractual issues, senior Israel Navy sources have made clear that the EL/M-2248 is the service's preferred multifunction radar for its projected next-generation surface combatant.

    Lockheed Martin recently commenced a nine-month study, awarded by the US Navy under a USD5.2 million Foreign Military Sales contract, to study adapting the company's Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) design for the Israel Navy. This work will appraise how Lockheed Martin's existing LCS hull, mechanical and electrical systems could be modified to accept the Israel Navy's selected combat systems.

    Israel Navy sources have also indicated that the MF-STAR is intended to provide surveillance, tracking and missile-guidance support for the new Barak-8 area defence missile system. Barak-8 is intended to equip the next-generation surface combatant, and will also be retrofitted to three existing Saar 5 corvettes.

    Developed by IAI MBT Systems and Space Technology in association with Elta and Rafael, Israel's Armament Development Authority, the extended-range Barak-8 active radar homing missile will offer a maximum range of 70 km to 80 km.

    According to the Israel Navy, Barak-8 will be compatible with the Lockheed Martin Mk 41 tactical-length vertical launcher system. After launch, the missile will initially receive mid-course guidance updates from the MF-STAR radar.

    During the terminal phase, the missile will fire a second motor and activate its active radar seeker to home on to the target.

    IAI and India's Defence Research and Development Organisation concluded a deal to jointly develop Barak-8 in New Delhi on 27 January 2006, after almost two years of negotiations.

    The joint development programme is valued at about USD330 million, to be split equally between the two countries. Reports from Delhi suggest that Barak-8 and the EL/M-2248 radar will be fitted to the Indian Navy's new Project 15A destroyers.
    :2guns:
     
  6. Dark Sorrow

    Dark Sorrow Respected Member Senior Member

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  7. Dark Sorrow

    Dark Sorrow Respected Member Senior Member

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    Mf-star

    Abstract:


    The MF-STAR is a multi-function S-band solid-state active conformal phased array radar system for the new generation of military ships. The radar system delivers high quality arena situation picture and weapons support, under the toughest target/environment conditions in the existing and future naval arena.
    Incorporating advanced technology and robust system architecture; the MF-STAR employs multi-beam and pulse Doppler techniques as-well-as robust ECCM techniques to extract fast, low RCS targets from complex clutter and jamming environments.


    Main Objectives:
    • Blue water and Littoral warfare support
    • Simultaneous multi-engagement support
    • Active and Semi active missile support
    • 3D long-range air surveillance
    • 3D medium range automatic threat alert
    • Missile horizon search and threat alert
    • Maritime surface surveillance
    • Target classification (including Helo)
    • Gunnery control and splash spotting

    Main advantages:
    • Fast threat alert response time
    • Very high tracking update rate and accuracy for priority targets
    • Short Search frame/TWS revisit time
    • Mid-course guidance of active/semi-active anti-air missiles
    • Illuminator enslavement for semi-active missiles
    • Automatic splash detection and measurement for gunnery support
    • High reliability and high availability
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Barak -8 (From Live Fist)


    [​IMG]

    The Barak-8, the next generation long-range surface-to-air missile that India and Israel are currently developing as part of a co-development contract signed in 2007. Not that it matters, but I broke the story about India and Israel signing up to co-develop the next-generation Barak in early 2007 when I was with the Express. IAI has published very little about the missile in the past, and continues to keep its specs under wraps. Here's some stuff, hot of the IAI press:

    The new generation Barak-8 Air and Missile Defense weapon system currently provides a complete solution to every type of airborne threat, whether that threat be from aircraft, tactical missiles, helicopters, or unmanned aerial vehicles. The system has two versions - maritime and land-based - each relying on an advanced, phased-array radar integrated with an advanced launch system containing “smart” missile interceptors, and a state-of-the-art command and control (C2) system, altogether providing full 360° coverage.

    Barak-8 is unique in that it has a built-in ‘intelligence’ within the missile battery’s C2 system. The C2 system can ‘talk’ with other missile batteries, with external radars, and with air traffic control systems, creating an optimized scenario for detecting, engaging, and destroying the target. It is manifested by the threat being automatically neutralized through the most appropriate missile battery launching the missile. Especially impressive is that a radar connected to a given missile battery that may have detected the threat may not necessarily be part of the same battery that will respond to the threat. This allows us to maximize the system’s capabilities and create the most optimal interception scenario. It should be noted that the advanced, digital, phased-array radar was specifically developed by IAI Elta Systems, Ltd.

    The system is designed from the start to intercept planes and tactical missiles such as air-to-ground missiles and naval anti-ship missiles. The Barak-8 is based on advanced concepts of defense system architecture, including advanced seekers, warheads, high performance maneuvering capabilities, and the ability to be optimally controlled. The missile can receive and process continuous updates on the position and flight trajectory of the target, and use these updates to adjust its own flight to best intercept and destroy the target. The unique missile propulsion system allows the missile to maintain energy, even after it has been airborne for an extended time, and reserve sufficient energy for the end-game or the target’s final engagement and hit. It must be remembered that the enemy missile is also trying to maneuver and evade the Barak-8.


    The battlefield does not only have one or two threats that the Barak-8 must neutralize; in fact, there are a wide range of threats, coming from all directions and creating a number of potential targets, including our own forces’ airplanes.

    Everything that was mentioned up until this point applies to any number of threats. Of course, no one battery, no matter how sophisticated, will be able to deal with dozens of missiles simultaneously. Integration and network coordination of resources creates synergy among the batteries and helps to successfully deal with a battlefield saturated with targets. For instance, within a given formation or fleet of naval ships, each equipped with a Barak-8, they communicate with one another through the secure communication channels and data link within the integrated system. In an automated manner, the system knows how to optimally allocate targets throughout various batteries of the naval formation, and among the various batteries of the network; and eliminate every threat, be it missiles, planes, or helicopters.

    Similarly, land-based versions of the Barak-8 system can be easily and quickly deployed across tens of kilometers between the individually deployed batteries, and provide 360° coverage over the widest possible protected area against cruise missiles, airborne munitions launched from planes or ships, and other threats.

    The system has the ability to interconnect with other systems and can thereby receive information on the threat from a wide variety of sources. It’s in its final stages of development, to be completed in 2010-2011. IAI already has customers for both the maritime and the land-based defense systems (Read India!).
     
  9. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    India, Israel To Co-Develop Advanced Barak Ship Defense Missile System

    India, Israel To Co-Develop Advanced Barak Ship Defense Missile System | India Defence

    India, Israel To Co-Develop Advanced Barak Ship Defense Missile System


    India and Israel have agreed to expand their already considerable missile development cooperation with an even longer-range version of their extended-range Barak ship defense system, this time for the Indian Air Force.

    Sources from both countries say they expect to sign an add-on development contract by early next year, following last month's conclusion of a memorandum of agreement between Indian defense research authorities and prime contractor Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI).

    This was reported by 'Deccan Herald'.

    The new land-based air defense system will feature a range of 150 kilometers, more than double that of the supersonic, vertically launched Barak-8, or BarakNG (New Generation) now being developed for the Indian Navy.

    "We've agreed to extend our ongoing BarakNG project with a longer-range missile capable of performing additional missions and meeting a larger array of threats," one Israeli source said in early July, noting that India's fiscal year ends in March 2008. "We're all looking to sign a contract by the end of the fiscal year."

    The program, he said, is "a natural extension" of the approximately $480 million, five-year contract concluded in early 2006 between the Indian Defence Research Development Organization (DRDO) and IAI.

    Indian Defence Ministry sources said Israeli partners have agreed to transfer all technologies and manufacturing capabilities relevant to the co-development program. They noted that the new land-based air defense system — a planned replacement for the Indian Air Force's Russian-made Pechora surface-to-air missiles (SAMs) — would provide full hemispheric, 360-degree interception coverage against existing and future threats.

    Sources declined to provide projected program costs, but estimated the effort would take about four years and a minimum of $300 million to develop unique system elements and an initial tranche of the land-based missiles.

    The Indian Air Force has a requirement for nine advanced air defense squadrons, each of which will feature two SAM units. A typical unit will include an acquisition radar, a guidance radar, a command-and-control center and three launchers with eight missiles apiece.

    Yossi Weiss, general manager of IAI's Systems, Missiles and Space Group, said in mid-May the Barak-8 air defense system under development would be "more capable and more sophisticated" than the U.S.-developed Patriot PAC-3. He declined to discuss details of the firm's ongoing cooperation with India, and did not offer any information regarding new longer-range versions of the Barak-based system.

    India's top ballistic missile scientist, Vijay Kumar Saraswat, said in December that India was no longer interested in buying the PAC-3, United Press International reported.

    Indian defense experts said the new land-based, longer-range Barak system also would benefit the Indian Navy, which is methodically pursuing longer-range capabilities since the 2004 approval of its Blue Water Navy doctrine.

    The deal extends arms-manufacturing ties with Israel even as India reaches out to other regional countries such as Iran and Qatar, with which New Delhi recently signed a groundbreaking agreement to codify defense cooperation.

    Tactical Defense System

    Gurpreet Khurana, a Navy commander and a defense analyst of the Institute of Defence Studies and Analysis (IDSA), a New Delhi think tank, called the long-range Barak a tactical defense system, not a strategic or offensive one.

    "A longer-range anti-missile system has become imperative today, with the increased [120-kilometer] range of anti-ship missiles like the Harpoons," Khurana said. "Besides, the missile platforms have a stand-off firing capability -- the P-3C Orion can launch the missile at an Indian Carrier Battle Group, without even entering the air-defense zone. In any case, interception of missiles at longer ranges is necessary, particularly to prevent saturation of air-defense response."

    The latest Barak-based co-development project marks the third phase of Indo-Israeli cooperation based on the air defense system by IAI and Israel's Rafael Armament Development Authority. The cooperation began in 2001 with a $270 million deal for the basic Barak ship defense system. Mutual satisfaction with system performance and Israeli willingness to engage in technology transfers led in January 2006 to the 70-kilometer-range BarakNG program.

    "This has been a phenomenally successful cooperative program, which has served as a springboard to all kinds of other potential projects," an Israeli industry source said.

    He estimated that the three Barak-based missile development efforts combined exceed $1.3 billion.

    Indian Defence Ministry sour-ces said scientists from the government's DRDL missile laboratory in Hyderabad are already working in Israel on the BarakNG program.

    In a June 29 conference in Hyderabad, Indian President A.P.J. Abdul Kalam praised the growing cooperation between India and Israel, particularly the cooperation with IAI. His guest of honor at the event, hosted by the Aeronautical and Astronautical Societies of India, was Itzhak Nissan, IAI's president and chief executive, who has led Barak and other missile and space cooperative development projects with India for more than a decade.

    Noting that IAI is partner "on some of the most advanced projects in the world," Nissan expressed high regard for the scientific and manufacturing capabilities that India contributes to joint development efforts, according to an IAI account of the event, released July 2.

    Indo-Israeli defense ties have been on the upswing since 1999, despite the opposition of the Indian leftist parties that helped bring the ruling United Progressive Alliance government to power. Today, Israel trails only Russia in defense exports to India. New Delhi has bought UAVs and electronic warfare systems for MiG aircraft, has received technology for the Barak missile, Phalcon radar for the Indian AWACS program and the advanced Green Pine radar for India's homegrown air defense program, Indian Defence Ministry sources said.

    "While it is commonly known that Israel is India's second-largest defense supplier, what is not generally known is the large number of platforms, such as AWACS to fighter aircraft, ships and tanks, on which the Israelis are providing systems support," said defense analyst Rahul Bhonsle, a retired Indian Army brigadier.

    "One can even expect a stranglehold of the Israeli defense suppliers unless India works out very detailed and foolproof integrity and sustenance clauses in their agreements," Bhonsle said. "This also implies a strategic long-term relationship as that between Russia and India today."
     
  10. EnlightenedMonk

    EnlightenedMonk Member of The Month JULY 2009 Senior Member

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    ^^ That's quite an ancient article, but an interesting read nonetheless...
     
  11. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Barak8 at Paris Show.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Dark Sorrow

    Dark Sorrow Respected Member Senior Member

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    Will the existing ships be armed with Barak-8 missile?
     
  13. venom

    venom DFI Technocrat

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    Barak 8 could be installed on Delhi class,Talwar class,Shavilik class & kolkata class.I dont think they will consider installing Barak-8 on olden ships due to their age.
     
  14. EnlightenedMonk

    EnlightenedMonk Member of The Month JULY 2009 Senior Member

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    So, will it be the Barak 8 on the Project 17A frigates, or will it be the normal Barak system ???
     
  15. venom

    venom DFI Technocrat

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    Barak NG is the navy version.It has a range of 60 kms.It will be ready for induction by 2012.

    The Project 17A Frigates will have Barak NG as well as Barak 1 or Kshatan CIWS.
    It will have a 2 layered air defense where in Barak NG will form the 1st layer At 60kms while Barak-1 or Kshatan CIWS will form the 2nd layer.
    Project 17A Frigates might be equipped with all the 3 systems as is going to be the case with Delhi class destroyers which has Shitil SAM [32-36kms range],Barak-1 [9k] & Kshatan CIWS.
     
  16. Dark Sorrow

    Dark Sorrow Respected Member Senior Member

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    A question for experts will EL/M 2248 can be used for surface scan?
     
  17. Dark Sorrow

    Dark Sorrow Respected Member Senior Member

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    Thanks for the info mate. I found out that both P-15 and P-17 will EL/M2238 and EL/M2248 as primary sensors. Can someone tell which will be the primary surface scan sensor.
     
  18. John

    John Guest

    Shitil SAM has a max. effective range of 50km and not 36km, the Barak NG with 60km range is useless and i doubt the range number fits. the Barak NG will have a longer range and i am sure the Navy is not stupid to invest so much on a missile that only delivers 10km extra range than the already very effective Shitil.

    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_44d3OT-xI3U/SbAPiuN_q0I/AAAAAAAAAqg/ECltjYEqmwE/s1600-h/SHTIL-2.jpg

    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_44d3OT-xI3U/SbAM9z78ruI/AAAAAAAAAqQ/OaMUbHEzer0/s1600-h/SHTIL-4.jpg


    I am certain the Barak-8 will have a longer range of upto atleast 80km or its pretty much a waste.
     
  19. venom

    venom DFI Technocrat

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    Ya Shitil-1 Has a max range of 45-50 kms.

    Range alone does not decides the deployment of SAM system.There are various other factors like Resistance to jamming, Reaction time , Lock on jam, Engagement altitude, Speed, Quality & efficiency of guidance radar systems, Data link capability etc....
     
  20. youngindian

    youngindian Senior Member Senior Member

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    Barak Moves Forward

    July 30, 2009: Israel successfully tested its improved Barak II missile. The firing took place from a Saar 5 class corvette, against an incoming missile, which was successfully destroyed. The Barak missiles cost of about $1.6 million, weigh 216 pounds each (with a 48 pound warhead) and have a range of ten kilometers. The missiles are mounted in an eight cell container (which requires little maintenance) and are launched straight up. The radar system provides 360 degree coverage and the missiles can take down an incoming missile as close as 500 meters away from the ship. Each Barak system (missile container, radar, computers and installation) costs about $24 million. The missile has a range of ten kilometers, and is also effective against aircraft.

    Israel weapons have a solid reputation for reliability and effectiveness. Israeli success in several wars adds to the appeal of their armaments. U.S. and Israeli arms manufacturers often work together, which also gives Israel an edge when selling their equipment. The Barak II has been exported to India, Chile, Singapore and Venezuela.

    Surface Forces : Barak Moves Forward
     
  21. 1.44

    1.44 Member of The Month SEPTEMBER 2009 Senior Member

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    Excellent news.Hope to see it inducted soon.
     

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