How the heart of AUV was developed

Discussion in 'Indian Navy' started by arnabmit, Aug 15, 2013.

  1. arnabmit

    arnabmit Homo Communis Indus Senior Member

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    How the heart of AUV was developed | idrw.org

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    The heart of a nearly 1,500 kg robotic vessel that travels inside water — Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) — was developed by the Department of Engineering Design, IIT Madras.

    The Defence Research and Development Organisation’s (DRDO) underwater vehicle is currently undergoing sea trials at about 100 metres below sea level. The four-metre long, 1.4-metre wide, flat fish-shaped vehicle can travel at a speed of about 7 km per hour at depths of up to 300 metres below sea level.

    Heart of the vehicle

    The control and navigation algorithms and guidance strategy are the three most challenging aspects of an AUV, and all these together are considered as the heart of the vehicle. They were developed by a team led by Prof. T. Asokan of the Department of Engineering Design, IIT Madras.

    The AUV has already passed the first stage of DRDO’s project level testing. There is now a proposal to expand the AUV project to a major development programme.

    The project level testing is basically to prove that technological integration of the software developed by IIT Madras with the hardware is possible, and the integrated system works as a whole.

    Further elaborating on the significance of the development programme, Prof. Asokan noted: “It is for multiple applications like transport and surveillance. There must be a separate AUV variant for each operation.” In the case of variants, only a fine-tuning of the algorithms and strategy is needed.

    The robotic vehicle is fully pre-programmed — in terms of algorithms and strategy, and mission requirements — and piloted by an onboard computer. There is no control of the vehicle once it is released into water. “This is one of the biggest challenges,” he said.

    The limited communication with the vehicle cannot be put to use for regular operation. It is reserved for emergency communications like aborting a mission or activating a vehicle recovery mechanism. Most of the AUVs are built with positive buoyancy that tends to bring the vehicle towards the surface, in case of any system failure.

    In the case of the AUV that is being tested by DRDO, the positive buoyancy is 15 kg. The vehicle moves at 0.3-0.4 metres per second speed when it comes to the surface due to positive buoyancy.

    “The AUV will require fool-proof navigation, control and guidance systems on board to meet the mission accuracy requirements,” Prof. Asokan said. “Even if one system fails, the mission will have to be abandoned and the vehicle recovered.

    The control algorithm ensures that the various performance parameters of the vehicle, like speed and acceleration are achieved. Guidance strategy, on the other hand, is about planning a certain path to avoid obstacles and maintaining a required trajectory.

    A navigation algorithm continuously monitors the location of the vehicle with respect to the desired location and corrects for any errors. The guidance strategy works in combination with navigation to maintain the pre-planned trajectory.

    When the vehicle deviates from its intended path, the guidance and control systems activate the propellers (technically called ‘thrusters’) and control planes to ensure that the vehicle returns to the original trajectory and continue moving along the desired path.

    The propeller configuration can be changed depending on the mission requirements. Movements in six different directions — upward and downward, forward and reverse, and left and right (port and starboard) — can be achieved by propellers placed suitably. Besides propellers, rudders and stern planes can also be used.

    Simulations

    Prior to developing the algorithms, Prof. Asokan and his team had to develop a dynamic model — mathematical equations of the robotic vehicle and payload. “Using the model we conducted many simulation studies to understand the performance and dynamic behaviour of the AUV,” he said.

    For instance, the simulation studies helped the team to understand how a particular thrust given to the vehicle changed the performance parameters like acceleration and turning rate. “Once we understood the normal operating behaviour, we started developing the controllers for desired performance,” he explained.
     
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  3. Abhijeet Dey

    Abhijeet Dey Regular Member

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    Can these machines be used for kamikaze attacks or sabotage missions against enemy ships in their own dockyard?
     
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  4. arnabmit

    arnabmit Homo Communis Indus Senior Member

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    DRDO’s Autonomous Underwater Vehicle in sea trials | idrw.org

    The indigenous autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) under development by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) is currently in sea trials, where it is reported to be functioning close to 100-metres below the surface in the Bay of Bengal. The AUV is being built to function at depths close to 300-metres. The platform is being developed in close coordination with IIT, Madras, which supplies much of the software and command algortithm matrices that guide the AUV under water.

    With the Electronics Corporation India Ltd (ECIL) as an engineering partner, DRDO’s Naval Science and Technology Laboratory (NSTL) in Visakhapatnam is also trying to develop a variant of the AUV that can conduct more frontline activity like mine-laying. The AUV will have passive sonar and electro-optical sensors. The DRDO AUV will be deployable and controllable from shore and ship, depending on the mission. In July 2010, the Navy announced its interest in acquiring 10 AUVs developed and built fully in India. It is keen on flexibility for variable payloads like high definition sonars and underwater cameras for surveillance reconnaissance activities of the sea bed, including oceanographic survey and specialised mapping. With preliminary testing near completion, the DRDO may consider asking the government to consider the AUV a major project, with attendant funding and budgetary support.
     
  5. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    They should be fast, put in like mines and made to attack specific targets.
     
  6. drkrn

    drkrn Senior Member Senior Member

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    yes.can be used,but needs to mature

    some thing like this
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OM2x5QraDRU
     
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  7. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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    DRDO to roll out underwater vehicles

    With its Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV), developed as a technology demonstrator, passing muster in extensive trials, the Naval Science and Technology Laboratory (NSTL) in Visakhapatnam will “make a few more of the same” for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions by the Navy and agencies like the Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Limited for safeguarding offshore installations.


    The NSTL is a facility of the Defence Research and Development Organisation.

    In his first media interaction after taking over as Director-General (Naval Systems and Materials) at the DRDO last week, V. Bhujanga Rao told The Hindu here that the flatfish-shaped, 1.7-tonne reconfigurable vehicle capable of carrying payloads of up to 500 kg would now be converted into an operational platform.

    Separately, the DRDO would work on a yet-to-be sanctioned Rs. 250-crore programme for developing a range of AUVs for a variety of roles as force multipliers. (As first reported by The Hindu, the agency is keen on developing mammoth AUVs, weighing 12 tonnes, which could function as submadrones under its secret Autonomous Sea Vehicle programme, which is similar to the U.S. Navy’s Manta Unmanned Underwater Vehicle Programme.)

    Mr. Rao said the Naval Physical and Oceanographic Laboratory (NPOL) had developed the capability for swift deployment of seabed arrays for coastal area monitoring. “It will be prohibitively expensive to deploy such a system along the entire coast, but it can be done depending on threat perception.” The NPOL was developing an Advanced Towed Array System for ships. This would be ready for trials in a year.

    The DRDO was in constant consultation with the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) to develop a mechanism to detect internal waves (caused by submarine movement) using space-borne sensors, he said.

    Mr. Rao said a certain number of the Advanced Light Torpedo developed by the NSTL was being delivered to the Navy by Bharat Dynamics Limited. Its heavyweight torpedo was undergoing user evaluation trials.

    As for materials, Mr. Rao said the Naval Materials Research Laboratory and the Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory had developed in-house warship-grade steel for the indigenous aircraft carrier.

    DRDO to roll out underwater vehicles - The Hindu
     
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  8. cobra commando

    cobra commando Tharki regiment Veteran Member Senior Member

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