How The Chinese View India

Discussion in 'China' started by Srinivas_K, May 24, 2015.

  1. Srinivas_K

    Srinivas_K Senior Member Senior Member

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    How the Chinese view India
    Abhik Roy

    | 24 May, 2015

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    As an academic, I have had the opportunity to travel to China several times. During my visits to several major cities, including Beijing, Changsha, Chengdu, Shanghai and Xiamen, I talked with many academic and non-academic people who were quite candid about sharing their views on Sino-Indian relations. I have also been engaged in online conversations with several Chinese scholars on this topic. A majority of the people I talked with felt that there was still lingering mistrust on both sides.



    Many Chinese unabashedly told me that they were skeptical about Modi’s intentions about resolving the border issues with China. On the one hand, Modi indicated his serious intent on establishing a close partnership with China. On the other hand, Modi seemed very keen on having close ties with Japan, Vietnam and Taiwan, which are now regarded as “enemy” countries by many Chinese.

    The majority of the Chinese people expressed their displeasure at Modi’s meeting with the Japanese Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, in Tokyo right after he took over as India’s Prime Minister. Some even thought it was Modi’s way to humiliate China because he went to meet Abe just before President Xi Jinping was scheduled to arrive in New Delhi.

    Although several Chinese appreciated Modi’s rhetoric about the shared values between the two nations, there were others who thought he was a glib talker who played to the gallery. Some of these folks expressed their doubt about Modi actually walking the walk. Furthermore, many viewed Modi’s close alliance with the United States and joining President Obama in criticising China’s policy on the disputed Diaoyu islands to be problematic. While some Chinese deemed the Indian Government’s complaints about China’s endeavours to woo India’s neighbours Sri Lanka and Nepal to be petty and unbecoming of a superpower, others thought India often came across as a “victim” and not as a strong, assertive nation as by eDeals" style="color: rgb(0, 64, 125); left: auto; opacity: 1; top: auto; padding-right: 0px !important; padding-left: 0px !important; margin-right: 0px !important; margin-left: 3px !important; text-decoration: underline !important; box-sizing: border-box !important; border: 0px !important; bottom: auto !important; clear: none !important; display: inline-block !important; float: none !important; height: auto !important; max-height: none !important; max-width: none !important; min-height: 0px !important; min-width: 0px !important; overflow: visible !important; position: static !important; right: auto !important; text-align: left !important; text-transform: uppercase !important; -webkit-transform: none !important; transform: none !important; vertical-align: baseline !important; visibility: visible !important; width: auto !important; word-wrap: break-word !important; zoom: 1 !important; z-index: auto !important; font-weight: 700 !important; background-position: 0px 0px !important;">COMPARED

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    by eDeals" style="color: rgb(0, 64, 125); left: auto; opacity: 1; top: auto; padding-right: 0px !important; padding-left: 0px !important; margin-right: 0px !important; margin-left: 3px !important; text-decoration: underline !important; box-sizing: border-box !important; border: 0px !important; bottom: auto !important; clear: none !important; display: inline-block !important; float: none !important; height: auto !important; max-height: none !important; max-width: none !important; min-height: 0px !important; min-width: 0px !important; overflow: visible !important; position: static !important; right: auto !important; text-transform: uppercase !important; -webkit-transform: none !important; transform: none !important; vertical-align: baseline !important; visibility: visible !important; width: auto !important; word-wrap: break-word !important; zoom: 1 !important; z-index: auto !important; font-weight: 700 !important; background-position: 0px 0px !important;">[​IMG] to China. A majority of them indicated that there seemed to be a lack of openness and sincerity on both sides to listen genuinely to each other’s respective positions regarding the disputed areas and that both countries’ position on the border issue appeared to be inflexible, which is probably why the border issue has never been resolved.


    The Chinese people were quite vocal in their criticism of the Indian media for perpetuating negative stereotypes and biased reporting on China. They were quick to point out that instead of depicting China in a positive light, many Indian media outlets seemed all too keen on portraying China as an “evil” nation or an “enemy of India.” According to them, Indian media reports would frequently be filled with stories about Chinese border incursions without giving both sides of the conflict, the dumping of Chinese goods on the Indian market, the inferior quality of Chinese products, abuse of human rights, corruption and scandals among government officials, and ethnic conflict in Xinjian, to name a few.

    Many lamented the fact that the Indian press did not educate the Indian people sufficiently about all the Chinese accomplishments in the areas of arts, literature, music, sports, science, and technology. Some were quick to point out how disappointed they were to find out that some Indian media even gloated over the Indian government beating the Chinese in the relief efforts in Nepal after the recent earthquake as if it was some kind of a competition. They thought it was in bad taste on the part of Indian media to exploit a human tragedy to show India’s rivalry with China. They seemed quite delighted in pointing out that Nepal had distanced themselves from India due to this kind of unprofessional coverage by the Indian media.

    The Chinese were unanimous in saying that media in both countries played a critical role in shaping public opinion. They opined that if the media in both countries were to focus more on positive news then people in both nations would have a better awareness and knowledge of each other that is devoid of stereotypes.

    In all these conversations the Chinese mentioned their profound appreciation of the Indian culture and their veneration of Mahatma Gandhi, Tagore and Dr. Dwarkanath Kotnis who provided invaluable medical assistance during the Second Sino-Japanese War in 1938. In fact, I met several scholars who showed me their copies of Tagore’s Gitanjali in Mandarin. They also pointed to the rich history of China and India having close ties that went back to thousands of years and how they had influenced each other in the fields of arts, music, literature, philosophy and religion. Chinese scholars frequently mentioned the names of Faxian who visited India in the early fifth century AD, and Xuanzang (Hsüan-tsang) who came to India around 631 AD, both of whom were instrumental in bringing Buddhism to China.

    Several people I talked with expressed their admiration for Bollywood movies and Hindi film songs. During my travels, I also happened to see many old Chinese folk dancing in a park in a very small town to “Jai Ho,” a song from the movie Slumdog Millionaire. Even to this day, Raj Kapoor and his film Awara are household names. I have lost count of how many Chinese, both young and old, would sing “Awara hoon” in Hindi to me. I also remember the long line of people waiting just to catch a glimpse of the black and white portrait of Raj Kapoor in the Indian pavilion at the World Expo in Shanghai in 2010.

    In all my conversations with the Chinese they evinced a strong interest in having some kind of a regular exchange of scholars, artists, writers, musicians, dancers, and filmmakers so that they could enrich each other’s lives in important ways. Many of them also expressed their desire to visit India but they felt that the Indian government did not seem too keen on promoting tourism to the Chinese for some reason.

    There seemed to be a general consensus that the people of both countries must be engaged in conversations to learn and appreciate each other’s cultures. They stated that the leaders and officials in both countries needed to learn to communicate more effectively with each other where they are not guided by stereotypes, biases, or prejudices. They agreed that it would be naive to assume that simply understanding the issues of intercultural communication would resolve all the differences confronting the two nations, but they also indicated that, ultimately, people, and not governments, negotiate and sign peace treaties.

    It was a true learning experience for me to hear first-hand what the Chinese had to say about Sino-Indian relations. Every Chinese person I talked with reiterated that they had nothing against India; all they wanted was peace and warm, cordial relations with their neighbour. Some even requested me to share with my friends in India that they have an abiding love and respect for India.

    I conclude this piece with a comment that a Chinese academic friend made very recently concerning the ongoing border issues between the two countries, which pretty much captures the sentiments of many Chinese I have talked with: “people are the same everywhere. They just want to be happy and live in peace. Unfortunately, it’s always the government that screws up everything. I blame both the Chinese and the Indian government for their inability to resolve the border issues in a timely manner and in a way that’s a win/win for all.”


    Read more at http://www.thestatesman.com/news/opinion/how-the-chinese-view-india/65077.html#DjUYYOefRA4QK0SS.99
     
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  3. DingDong

    DingDong Senior Member Senior Member

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    How the Chinese view us must not matter to us (does CCP care about the views of the common Chinese?). Our policies must be dictated by our views and interests.
     
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  4. Srinivas_K

    Srinivas_K Senior Member Senior Member

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    This is like a gauge to improve the relations.
     
  5. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    ^^
    True..
    CCP doesnt give a damn about views of ordinary Chinese. It doesnt really matter what the Chinese Citizen think.

    India has to deal with CCP and the way they act and react.

    View of Citizens matter when it comes to politics and policies of a democracy.
     
  6. Compersion

    Compersion Senior Member Senior Member

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    A Communist Chinese the view is it the same like a Non Communist Chinese.

    Is there a difference.

    Does Chinese person hate Indian ... (not sure) ... if a reasonable Indian and Chinese person sit together and share their history and future potential what would they say !!
     
  7. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

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    They may be different on the question of communism, but most likely sharing the same view on India.

    Why hate India? We fight and blame, but that is a part of business, nothing is personal. No, we may dislike India, but we don't hate India.

    You already know enough in this forum.
     
  8. ezsasa

    ezsasa Senior Member Senior Member

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    I remember seeing a BBC documentary on infrastructure upgrade of Some historical city (can't remember the name), my impression was that common Chinese citizenry who do not have political affiliations might get along just fine with Indians.
     
  9. mattster

    mattster Respected Member Senior Member

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    I know lots of Chinese who are recent immigrants, students, etc, and I like many of them.

    But they have a sort blind nationalism that makes it impossible for them to take another side in any debate about international relations, etc.

    Let me give you an example: If India were to claim an small piece of rock about a 100 miles off the coast of Thailand.....most fair-minded Indians would admit that that was not fair to the Thais and as it over a thousand miles from Indian coast, and India had no right to claim it.

    But when China claims islands that are barely a 100 miles from the Philippines - you will not find a single Chinese that will openly admit that they are bullying a smaller and weaker country. Even the most liberal open-minded cosmopolitan Chinese will simply parrot the official line that the whole of South China Sea belongs to them.

    This is the fundamental difference between Chinese and other races - Chinese don't really believe in anything that does not directly benefit them. Their principles, values, ethics. conscience, and morals are all ELASTIC. The Chinese will do good things if it benefits them. They will also do bad things as long as it benefits them, and no one can stop them.

    Everything is elastic......there is no sacred ground that they won't stomp on as long as it is profitable and they can get away with it.

    Right now as we speak they are dredging up the coral reefs that supports one of the richest natural fisheries in world to build the new islands on the Spratlys. They are building islands on 5 different reefs and moving millions of tons of soil and rock from the ocean. They don't care what it does to the environment or the fisheries or neighboring countries.

    Somehow no matter how many times the Chinese stomp on India with insults and humiliations that are timed just when an important diplomatic meeting happens - there are still many gullible Indians who firmly believe that China and India can become friends and even allies.
     
  10. bose

    bose Senior Member Senior Member

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    @mattster I am not among those Indians who believe that India & China can be allies ... It simply can not be they are competting against each other for resources and energy... further the history says Nehru found how far China can go to back stab anyone for its interests... In fact you will see the hate in China for USA who saved their A$$ in world war - II.

    Chinese are not taught to think rationally and independently, not following cummunist line will invite severe punishment with long jail terms... China have a closed society devoid of any dissent ...
     
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  11. Mad Indian

    Mad Indian Proud Bigot Veteran Member Senior Member

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    I am surprised the debate on this thread went after this post.
     
  12. Compersion

    Compersion Senior Member Senior Member

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    Appreciate your reply

    Different question of Communism ... what does that mean.

    Please do share the Communist Chinese and Non Communist Chinese view of India - is it the same: Are you a Communist Chinese ...

    I also do not understand the dislike you mention. Is it like the Japanese dislike. Is it like the North Korean dislike. Is it like the American dislike. Is it a special dislike. What is the dislike and why. There is no hatred. Is there hatred for others.

    With Business conditions ... The Chinese are renowned business people and we do give a hard bargain sometimes. Are Communist Chinese better business-people compare to Non Communist Chinese.

    Like i said - a reasonable Indian and Chinese person CAN sit together ... and best case is you can even do it in a foreign country like Australia and with a beer across a table in peace and really wonder a lot. Cheers
     
  13. nimo_cn

    nimo_cn Senior Member Senior Member

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    how do you think of Vietnam and Philippines, who built islands on the reefs in south China Sea long before China does it? do they care about environment?

    来自我的 HUAWEI P7-L07 上的 Tapatalk
     
  14. Illusive

    Illusive Senior Member Senior Member

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    Do these Chinese live in a well, talk about hypocrisy, we have been engaging these nations only now that too on diplomatic level, but these Chinese have been financing Pak military since ages, doesn't recognize one India, keep providing lethal weapons to pak including nuclear weapons tech, blocking resolutions of sanctions on pak terror group. The only one who's intention should be questioned for resolving issues is China.
     
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  15. Mad Indian

    Mad Indian Proud Bigot Veteran Member Senior Member

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    Actually more important question is, do their opinions even matter?. Who gives a shit what Chinese commoners think of anything. After all, they have no influence over their CCP's decisions. Its a waste of time to even think about what Chinese think of us
     
  16. Illusive

    Illusive Senior Member Senior Member

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    Agree with that point and also @DingDong made earlier, but it would be better if its a positive image if and when Chinese people decide to take matters into their own hand and transition into a democracy. Long term goals should always be peace because people have short memories and maintaining a people to people contact would be beneficial.
     
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  17. mattster

    mattster Respected Member Senior Member

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    Nimo.......have you ever looked at a Map of the Spratly and Paracel Islands and exactly how far away it is from Philippines or Vietnam as compared to China.......are you freaking crazy ? This is exactly my point......it is like someone arguing that Britain has more right to the Falklands than Argentina ?

    But more to the point of my post, Nimo - what I am saying is the Chinese people even the smartest, best educated, best travelled among them are completely blind to any form of reason when it comes to nationalistic matters.

    I am saying the mentality of Chinese people is a "dog eat dog" mentality. And the more you give in to China - the more they take from you. So unless they have a reason to fear you.....they are going to stomp on you all day and all night if you weak. The Chinese don't respect good behaviour - they only respect strength. India and all neighbours of China need to be wary.
     
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  18. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

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    What is the difference India means to Communist Chinese and Non Communist Chinese? Nothing! India is the same for both groups (Actually it is quite hard to tell who is Communist Chinese and who is non communist Chinese. It is more like today's left party and right party among Westerners): A foreign country.

    The hatred is more like the feeling between Indian and Pakistani, or even worse.
    Dislike is more like the relationship between you and your girlfriend's ex-boyfriend who is still trying to get her back by disgracing you.

    When doing business, they are all the same.
     
  19. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

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    Name me one single case in foreign affairs that CCP makes the decision against the view of Chinese public.
     
  20. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

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    First, who told you that China hate USA? Once again, Chinese got the same feeling to Americans as Indians: DISLIKE. The only country that you say "hate" is Japan.
    Second, wrong, Chinese public is still grateful for what USA did in WW2. But it doesn't mean that China gets no reason to be furious about the activities of USA.

    Couldn't be wrong further. If you said is true, then India should be the No.2 country today, not China.
     
  21. nimo_cn

    nimo_cn Senior Member Senior Member

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    we dont need you to sincerely recognize Chinese sovereignty over south China Sea. If endorsement from India is a must, China could do nothing.

    I am asking how do you think of Vietnam's reclamation work on the reefs? Vietnam's island building is not destroying the environment?

    what a crap!

    I love to see you clowns jumping up and down as China is gaining defacto control over SCS.

    来自我的 HUAWEI P7-L07 上的 Tapatalk
     

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