How Boeing engineer spied for Chinese for 30 years&Stole Secrets

Discussion in 'China' started by sorcerer, Nov 10, 2014.

  1. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Undercover: Dongfan 'Greg' Chung spent 30 years supplying information to the Chinese

    An American engineer was convicted of waging a 30-year campaign of industrial espionage after police found 300,000 pages of sensitive material at his home. Chinese-born Dongfan 'Greg' Chung, 73, stole the documents while working for Boeing and Rockwell International as a stress analyst.
    Investigators believe at least some of the material, which included information about the US space shuttle and a booster rocket, was handed on to China.
    Chung was convicted of six counts of economic espionage, one count of acting as a foreign agent, one count of conspiracy and one count of lying to federal agents.He could face up to 90 years in prison when he is sentenced in November.


    In a 31-page ruling, U.S. District Judge Cormac J. Carney said: 'The trust Boeing placed in Mr. Chung to safeguard its proprietary and trade secret information obviously meant very little to Mr. Chung, 'He cast it aside to serve the PRC (People's Republic of China), which he proudly proclaimed as his "motherland." Prosecutors only discovered Chung's activities while investigating another suspected Chinese spy in 2006.The trail led them to his house, where they discovered a huge cache of sensitive documents. These included information about a fueling system for a booster rocket and on the space shuttle - documents that employees were ordered to lock away at the end of each day. Boeing invested $50 million in the technology over a five-year period.Chung, investigators now believe, began spying for the Chinese in the late 1970s, a few years after he became a naturalised US citizen and was hired by Rockwell International. He worked for Rockwell until it was bought by Boeing in 1996 and was finally laid off in 2002.

    A year later, the company rehired him as a consultant. He was fired after the FBI launched its investigation into his activities.Chung opted for a non-kury trial that ended on June 24.During 10 days of proceedings, defense attorneys said Chung was a 'pack rat' who hoarded documents at his house, but they insisted he was not a spy.They also claimed he had violated Boeing policy by bringing the papers home but had not broken any laws - and that the US government could not prove he has passed secret information to China.

    Judge Carney, however, dismissed the suggestion that Chung was a pack rat as 'ludicrous.'He ordered the defendant, who had been free on $250,00 bail, to be kept in
    custody until he was sentenced, adding a man facing such a long sentence with close ties to China could easily flee.

    Speaking after the verdict, Ivy Wang, prosecuting, said: 'I hope that one of the messages that goes out is if someone is going to steal proprietary information and steal that information for the benefit of another country, they are going to be charged in this country and face very serious punishment for doing so.' Thomas Bienert, defending, said he planned to appeal.

    'A big feature (of this case) is not about what China wanted Mr Chung to do, but about what Mr Chung was willing to do,' Bienert said outside the courtroom.'There is no evidence that China used or benefited from anything in this case.'

    Chung's trial is America's first under the Economic Espionage Act. The legislation was passed in 1996 to help the government crack down on the theft of information from private companies that contract with the government to develop US space and military technologies.

    It became a priority in the mid-1990s when the US realised China and other countries were targeting private businesses as part of their spy strategy. Since then, six economic espionage cases have settled before trial. In some of the cases, defendants were sentenced to just a year or two in prison. Another is set for trial in US District Court in San Jose this year.

    Steven Fink, president of Lexicon Communications Corp., a corporate crisis management firm, said prosecutors previously have tried cases under a different part of the 1996 act involving theft of trade secrets. He questioned why it took so long for the government to try someone on the economic espionage charges levied in the Chung case, saying he believes officials were too worried about ruffling diplomatic feathers.

    'In the past there had been times when diplomacy has trumped national security,' he said.

    'This (verdict) is a spit in the ocean unless it is a sign that the government is going to get aggressive in prosecuting these cases, because there are a lot of them out there The Chinese government has made no comment on the case.

    How Boeing engineer spied for Chinese for 30 years... and stole secrets on space shuttle | Daily Mail Online
     
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  3. CCP

    CCP Senior Member Senior Member

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    US should fire all Chinese engineers who are working in US companies.

    So, they can come back and work for China.:namaste:
     
  4. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Come back and work on What? That remains a question dont you think?
     
  5. CCP

    CCP Senior Member Senior Member

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    Well, they have to work on their fields.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2014
  6. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    ^^

    Absoultely, They have to work in their fields.
     
  7. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    The US Thinks China May Have Stolen Military Robot Designs
    At least one China-backed cyberspy operation reportedly snared robotics research from QinetiQ, a Pentagon contractor and the supposed inspiration for gadget-maker “Q” in the James Bond movie franchise.

    This week, the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission began looking for analysts to write an unclassified report on China’s current industrial and military robotics capabilities, including the origins of those capabilities.

    The study will identify know-how and tools that “have likely been acquired by China through technology transfers or cyber penetrations,” according to a Jan. 13 federal business solicitation.

    The commission also intends to gauge the chances China’s automation efforts could eclipse comparable Pentagon initiatives, including “Offset,” a Defense Department research initiative meant to “offset” technological advances made by adversaries.


    There are concerns China might be gaining an unfair competitive advantage in the robotics race.

    Between 2007 and 2009, attackers tied to the People’s Liberation Army allegedly hacked a QinetiQ specialist who worked on embedded software in microchips that control the company’s military robots, Bloomberg reported, citing investigations by security firms Terremark and HBGary. The Chinese military later showcased a bomb disposal robot in April 2012 that resembled QinetiQ’s Dragon Runner.

    Now the United States is saying publicly it’s aiming to find out the technical specs of China’s humanoids. The forthcoming report will “identify key suppliers of components and chips,” as well as programming languages used in robotics research and development.

    “To what extent do Chinese robotics technologies rely on U.S. or other imported software, components or other technology?” is one question the study will address.

    In addition, the U.S. government seeks to learn the names of R&D organizations in the Chinese robotics field and locate any ties to the PLA.

    Chinese “breakthroughs” in self-driving vehicles, unmanned aircraft and seagoing drones are also an area of U.S. interest.

    The commission last year noted that, already, Chinese robots are capable of engaging in extraterrestrial war.

    While antisatellite systems haven’t been much of a threat since the Cold War, China’s space activities suggest the nation state is tailoring machines to potentially eviscerate U.S. space assets, according to the commission’s 2015 report to Congress. The Chinese systems consist of “a satellite armed with a weapon,” commission officials said. Once close enough to an American target, the machine can deploy the armament against or “intentionally crash into the target satellite.”

    China is “setting a strong foundation for future co-orbital antisatellite systems that could include jammers, robotic arms, kinetic kill vehicles, and lasers,” the report stated.

    Some of China’s hopes for AI-powered combat are public knowledge.

    Chinese state-sponsored news agency Xinhua on Dec. 27, 2015 reported that, at a China civil-military integration conference in Beijing, several military equipment-makers demonstrated to 200 PLA members products that included robots and unmanned reconnaissance aircraft.

    “The Chinese government and the PLA have meted out a succession of measures to boost the private sector’s participation in the arms and equipment industry over the past two years,” according to Xinhua.

    Deputy Defense Secretary Robert Work recently said he expects to see Chinese or Russian robotic troops orchestrating military operations one day soon.

    “We know that China is already investing heavily in robotics and autonomy, and the Russian Chief of General Staff [Valery Vasilevich] Gerasimov recently said that the Russian military is preparing to fight on a roboticized battlefield,” Work told a national security forum on Dec. 14, 2015, according to Defense One. ”And he said, and I quote, ‘In the near future, it is possible that a complete roboticized unit will be created capable of independently conducting military operations.’”

    http://www.defenseone.com/technolog...n-military-robot-designs/125168/?oref=d-river
     

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