Hong Kongers decry Chinese rule

Discussion in 'China' started by ajtr, Jul 2, 2012.

  1. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2009
    Messages:
    12,038
    Likes Received:
    715
    Hong Kongers decry Chinese rule

    [​IMG]
    WANTING TO HAVE A SAY: PROTESTERS RAISE FLAGS AS TENS OF THOUSANDS OF HONG KONG RESIDENTS MARCH IN A DOWNTOWN STREET DURING AN ANNUAL PRO-DEMOCRACY PROTEST. PICTURE: AP AP

    A HUGE Hong Kong protest has provided a defiant reception for its new leader and a show of popular anger after 15 years of Chinese rule.


    The vast rally came after Leung Chun-ying, a millionaire property consultant seen as close to China's communist authorities, was sworn in as chief executive in front of Chinese President Hu Jintao - who had his speech interrupted.

    Mr Hu's visit and Mr Leung's inauguration have become focal points for growing discontent towards Beijing, which has surged to a new post-handover high amid soaring housing costs, limited democracy and perceived meddling by China.

    "Hong Kong has become much worse off," Eric Lai of the Civil Human Rights Front told the marchers. "Our rights are under serious threat."

    Organisers put the crowd at 400,000, their largest claimed turnout for eight years and almost twice their number last year. But police said only 63,000 attended - although that was also their largest figure for eight years.

    The marches have become an annual fixture since 2003, when 500,000 people showed their fury over a security bill and economic downturn, a key factor in the then chief executive Tung Chee-hwa stepping down the following year.

    Yesterday's crowd ranged from engineers and civil servants to maids and students, and represented groups from the Falun Gong spiritual movement to trade unions, as well as ordinary citizens young and old.

    In sweltering heat the last of them reached their destination almost six hours after the first set out, and along the way they blocked streets far across the city, stranding buses and trams as they surrounded them.

    Mostly clad in the mourning colours of black and white, they carried placards calling for "One person one vote" and chanted "Power to the people", sometimes in more of a carnival atmosphere, complete with drums and songs.

    The financial centre enjoys significant autonomy and civil liberties unheard of on the mainland under the "one country, two systems" model covering its return to China in 1997 after more than a century of British rule.

    But marcher Jacky Lim, 37, who carried Hong Kong's former colonial flag bearing the British Union Jack, said: "There is nothing worth celebrating today. Hong Kong is being gradually destroyed by the Communist Party.

    "The direct interference of Beijing in the election of Leung Chun-ying is a clear example," he said.

    Hong Kong does not yet choose its leader by universal suffrage, and Mr Leung was elected as chief executive in March by a committee stacked with pro-Beijing business elites.

    A spokesman for the Hong Kong government said it "fully respected" freedom of expression and the right to "take part in processions", and would listen to the demonstrators' views "in a humble manner".

    Earlier, as Mr Hu began his speech to around 2300 guests at Mr Leung's inauguration, a protester inside the harbour-front venue repeatedly shouted "End one-party rule".

    The man also referred to the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989 in Beijing, and was rapidly bundled away by security personnel, while the audience drowned him out with extended applause for Mr Hu.

    Beijing's support for "one country, two systems" and the right of Hong Kongers to rule the territory was "unwavering", said Mr Hu.

    "We will follow the Basic Law... to continue to advance democratic development in Hong Kong," said the president, who will step down as part of a once-in-a-decade leadership transition in Beijing starting later this year.

    Mr Hu - who said Friday he hoped to understand Hong Kongers' "life and expectations" - left for Beijing before the march began.

    Stifling security was imposed for his three-day visit, with police using pepper spray on demonstrators at one point on Saturday, and briefly detaining a Hong Kong reporter who shouted a question about Tiananmen at Mr Hu.

    China's economic rise has helped spur impressive growth in Hong Kong and boost the city's status, and supporters packed a stadium yesterday for a gala celebration featuring a People's Liberation Army parachute display.

    But tensions are growing between the seven million locals and their northern neighbours, with newly rich Chinese mainlanders accused of everything from pushing up property prices to monopolising maternity beds.

    A poll released by Hong Kong University last week showed mistrust towards Beijing at 37 per cent, a post-handover high, and the number of Hong Kongers identifying themselves primarily as citizens of China plunged to a 13-year low in another survey.

    There are also complaints about a widening gap between rich and poor and Mr Leung has promised to tackle the grievances but ahead of his swearing-in, a group of demonstrators burned his portrait.

    "If we work together, I am sure Hong Kong - the Pearl of the Orient - will sparkle again," Mr Leung said in his speech.
     
    maomao likes this.
  2.  
  3. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2009
    Messages:
    12,038
    Likes Received:
    715
    Mass protests as Hong Kong marks 15 years under China

    Tens of thousands of pro-democracy demonstrators have marched through the streets of Hong Kong as the former British colony marked 15 years since the return to Chinese rule.

    The rally for human rights takes place annually, but has been bolstered this year by anger towards Beijing.

    Earlier, China's visiting President Hu Jintao swore in businessman CY Leung as the territory's new leader.

    During the ceremony, a lone heckler tried to interrupt Mr Hu's speech.

    On the streets outside, massive crowds beat drums and waved flags as they marched though the city to call for full democracy and express their frustration with the mainland.

    'Rule of law'
    The BBC's Juliana Liu, who was at the protest, says there was a carnival atmosphere with political parties shouting slogans and civic groups showing off their singing and dancing skills.

    One of the main complaints was that the system used to choose Hong Kong's leader is designed to install Beijing's choice.

    A so-called electoral college of 1,200 business leaders and other influential citizens, mostly loyal to Beijing, selects the leader.

    Elaine Mok, who was taking part in the protest with her family, said the march was about the right to universal suffrage.

    "We're fighting for justice. We're fighting for the rule of law," she told the BBC. "The Chinese government is interfering with the workings of the Hong Kong government, and that's not right."

    "We are fighting for the right to vote. It should have happened by now."

    According to Paul Yip, a demographic specialist at the University of Hong Kong, some 82,000 people attended the rally - about 20,000 more than last year's demonstration.

    Organisers, meanwhile, put the figure much higher, at 400,000.

    'Joyous occasion'
    Our correspondent says Mr Hu's visit was a far cry from his last appearance five years ago, when he toured Hong Kong in a blaze of pre-Olympic glory.

    At the swearing-in ceremony, Mr Hu offered "warm congratulations" to the 57-year-old Mr Leung and his team and described the 15th anniversary as a "joyous occasion".
    He reiterated Beijing's commitment to the "one country, two systems" policy whereby Hong Kongers are allowed many more political freedoms than Chinese people on the mainland.

    Mr Hu continued the address despite an interruption by a member of the crowd, who was heard calling for a condemnation of the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre and an end to one-party rule in China.

    The man, who was a guest at the inauguration ceremony, was quickly bundled out of the harbourfront building by security.

    Mr Hu, whose visit was carefully choreographed, left before Sunday's protests began.

    But on Saturday, police had to shield the president from demonstrators, and officers used pepper spray to disperse crowds who were demanding an investigation into the death in China of a Tiananmen activist, Li Wangyang, last month.

    His visit comes as public confidence in the Beijing government has fallen to a new low.

    People are unhappy with record property prices, an increasing wealth gap, a lack of democracy and a string of political scandals, our correspondent says.

    Hong Kong, a British colony until 1997, has a comparatively high degree of autonomy from Beijing.

    But China's leaders in Beijing have resisted public pressure for full democracy in the city.

    Mr Leung replaces Donald Tsang, who took office in 2005.
     
  4. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2010
    Messages:
    5,524
    Likes Received:
    1,547
    If u can understand Chinese slogans on those banners u may have a grip of Hong Kong -er's major grievances

    - universal suffrage on white banners: for the time being the Chief of Hong Kong is elected by an electoral college of 1200 members. Universal suffrage won't happen until 2016. Business tycoons have a big say in local politics.

    - Labor rights on yellow banners: there's a wide social disparity and a polarization between the rich and the poor. The minimum wage bill was passed only last May.
     
    W.G.Ewald likes this.
  5. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    There seems to be discontent in Hong Kong.

    And it is most surprising the Hu Jintao was interrupted.

    It is something that is never heard of under the Chinese rule.
     
  6. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Simply shocking.

    And carrying the Queen's photo is like a direct slap in the face of the Chinese Communists, as if to suggest that the British rule was far better than that under the Chinese Communists.
     
    Aayush likes this.
  7. s002wjh

    s002wjh Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,209
    Likes Received:
    126
    its just mean there is more freedom there than mainland
     
    StarShip Enterprise likes this.
  8. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2009
    Messages:
    3,173
    Likes Received:
    422
    First, looking at the crowd distanced from him, how many queen picture have you found? It may suggest that how popular this idea is.
    Second, look at this people's age and you can know how much he knows about british rules--he probably holds this picture because the queen happened to have a pretty face in her early age.
    Third, obviously he has the freedom to denouce CCP's influence in HK. Isn't that CCP promised? It looks like that CCP keep its word.
     
  9. mki

    mki Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2011
    Messages:
    295
    Likes Received:
    196
    Location:
    Christchurch
    First: the article says the number of people is 400000 according to organizers and officially its 63000. can you even count 63 individual from the snap? ( i can't, may be i need to eye checkup).
    Second: Its god gift to majority of East Asian, Chinese and Japanese people about the age. They look lot younger that actual. ( 2 years back before getting committed i asked one Chinese lady (she was smoking hot) for date. I thought she is 25-26 year old but after date i got to know she is 47... :toilet:)
    Third: you can not believe CCP's word. You never know when they change their act. After all CCP and Paki are best friend.
     
  10. s002wjh

    s002wjh Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,209
    Likes Received:
    126
    lol one queens photo and you think everyone there want rule by an old hag. the protest was about the new HK leader, not about support of UK queen. if someone in US hold a sarah palin photo, is that mean everyone want sarah palin to be president lol
     
  11. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Even one picture of the Queen should not be acceptable to the Communist regime.

    Would the Americans allow a picture of Osama bi Laden Mao held aloft (to indicate they are better than the US democracy) when some protest march has been organised in front of the White House?

    Age of the protester does not matter.

    He is entitled to denounce anything that he wants, but he should not indicate that the old regime of the imperialists is better than the regime of the Communists and their proteges.

    His 'statement' is indicative that the Communist regime is reprehensible and disgusting and it was better when the Chinese were under the Imperialists.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2012
  12. billyong

    billyong Guest


    "Even one picture of the Queen should not be acceptable to the Communist regime."
    LOL It's 2012! not 1945 in UK! You can hold anything you went in China as long as you following the LAW! No one care!

    "Would the Americans allow a picture of Osama bi Laden Mao held aloft (to indicate they are better than the US democracy) when some protest march has been organised in front of the White House?"

    Dude !Are you for real ???Of course you can held MAO in front of the White House! What's wrong with that?? He is on every damn Chinese's money!(BTW check out Mike Tyson's arm!)
    bi Laden is a terrorist!when did your queen became a terrorist??
     
  13. agentperry

    agentperry Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2010
    Messages:
    3,022
    Likes Received:
    678
    Location:
    delhi
    they want rule of crown back. red carpet worse then brit exploitative rule.
     
  14. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2009
    Messages:
    3,173
    Likes Received:
    422
    Well, the communist regime can do nothing about it. Hongkong's current political system decides that CCP cannot control it directly but influence it.

    Since when China declare that UK or the queen as the enemy of china?

    It does! Your age means how much first hand knowledge you got about UK rule! I bet this guy has no idea that Hongkongness had no right to select their leaders before 1996 direct or indrect. Cursing CCP's hand in Hongkong is fine, but using UK as their example is quite funny.

    CCP doesn't stop him from expressing his own opinion. Everyone has his or her reason to be unsatisfied with life - CCP has lots more serious problems to face, really don't have time or energy for his concerns unless the majority of chinese has the same concern.
     
  15. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2009
    Messages:
    3,173
    Likes Received:
    422
    So, what is your point?

    Maybe you cannot tell the age of a chinese. But my friend, I am very confident that I can, simply because I am a chinese.

    I don't believe any gov's word, I see what they do: so far, CCP still keeps its word--you didn't see the police or army standing in their way, right?
     
  16. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    If they can 'influence' the quasi democracy of Hong Kong, they can 'influence' anything in Hong Kong. 'Influence' is the polite lexicon in the Communist dictionary for 'control'.



    Since when did the US declare Mao as the enemy of the US? But try taking out a demonstration with a Mao's photo stating that Communism should replace US democracy!



    If that were so that age matters, I presume it would preclude you from being so authorative about many things in China that was well before your time.

    Has the Communist regime banned all books about Hong Kong's history that people are kept ignorant?

    I am sure that could be so, since ignorance is the ideal way how a repressive and authoratative dictatorship controls its people.


    China has problems but sure it knows how to bring demonstrations to a stop e.g. Tienanmen Square, Tibet, Xinjiang and so on. Possibly in Hong Kong that would not be possible because there are too many foreigners and so the ruthless repression will get a huge publicity of the horrors the Chinese Govt perpetuates over its 'wayward' citizens.
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2012
  17. Sunder singh

    Sunder singh Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2012
    Messages:
    535
    Likes Received:
    143
    Location:
    FROM NAINITAL NOW IN CHENNAI
    may chinese r infected with stochom sndrom.
    they r happy even in oppersive enviroment or may they themself r ccp member.
     
    amitkriit likes this.
  18. mylegend

    mylegend Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2011
    Messages:
    430
    Likes Received:
    96
    The title is inaccurate, for the most part, people are against CCP's rule. Most of protesters really cared about mainland issue such as Tiananmen Square and the mysteries death of Li Wangyang. If the issue is against China, then no one will even care much of those issue.
     
  19. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2009
    Messages:
    3,173
    Likes Received:
    422
    In communist dictionry, there is no such word of "influence". That is the invention of democracy, so you can't blame CCP for following the rule of democratic rule.
    How about since the date Mao declared US as his country's de faco enemy by sending the troops into korea and vietname to fight against USA?
    How about since Bin Laden declared his personal responsiblity for 911?


    Yes, that is why I just always repeat the historic knowledge taught by my parents and my grandparents.

    See, my friend, you are making some wrong assumptions again: before 1980, maybe; after 1980, that is a mission impossible.




    Your assumption is wrong again, or I would say -- outdated!
    Before 2000, that maybe true.
    After 2000, CCP has changed its policy-from stopping an demonstration to preventing it from escalation.
    Generally, CCP prefer negotiating or let the demostration go first and try to calm people down. If the demostration develops to an violent conflct no matter which side, that means some officials drop the ball. You can be sure that someone will lose his position later.
    Of course, I bet the indian or western media/tv didn't tell you that.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2012
  20. satish007

    satish007 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2011
    Messages:
    1,458
    Likes Received:
    202
    Location:
    China
    The Muslim women is funny, she doesn't understand what's the posters are protesting, she should use Ray's queen picture.
    She need work hard to catch up Ray's level.
    glad to see China join the protesting country family like India. (actually HK, but HK is part of China now)
    Chinese should have more protesters in other places. CCP should allow protesters protest everything
    such as , CCP sucks or return south tibet to China, get out from China, India backstabber.
    BTW, looks some HK guys are not very serious, protesters should show some angry.happy protesting does not make sense,
    only French do that.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2012
  21. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    That is why it is false to believe that there is democratic processes in China, when actually it is an autocratic regime that is a dictatorship in the extreme!


    China declares things like petulant children.

    But where has the US declared China as the enemy.

    What about Bin Laden?

    US has merely declared him a criminal to be brought to justice and which they did.

    The same way the CCP declared the Gang of Four as criminals!




    You prove my point.

    Or have you no faith in your parents and grandparents?



    There is nothing impossible.

    Imagine Mao's Ideology was jettisoned overnight! The ideology that the Chinese swore by and even went on to massacre people during the Cultural Revolution!

    If that could happen, then anything can happen.

    It is not a Tom Cruise movie! ;)





    Yesterday is outdated today.

    History isn't.

    History that even China cannot deny.
     

Share This Page