High Crime Rate of US/West and India, a Study

Discussion in 'Religion & Culture' started by santosh10, Oct 26, 2014.

  1. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

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    High Crime Rate of US/West and India, a Study

    United States incarceration rate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    While Americans represent about 5 percent of the world's population, nearly one-quarter of the entire world's inmates have been incarcerated in the United States in recent years.[3] Imprisonment of America's 2.3 million prisoners, costing $24,000 per inmate per year, and $5.1 billion in new prison construction, consumes $60.3 billion in budget expenditures. :facepalm:

    we find its rise mainly since 1970, as below :ranger:

    =>
    Whole World

    [​IMG]

    List of countries by incarceration rate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



    => U.S. most armed country with 90 guns per 100 people | Reuters
     
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  3. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Top 10 Countries With Highest Reported Crime Rate
    August 26, 2013

    For the development and survival of any country the most important thing is the inside peace of that country. For this peace it is important that all of the people in that country should follow all of the regulations and also secure the people’s rights. But, when if the residents of a country stop following these rules and regulations and start snubbing the rights of other people then the peace of that country disturb and crime rate is getting high. This increase in crime rate can affect the development and the international image of that country and foreign visitors and companies hesitate to come here and invest their money in the country. To control the situation it is necessary that the police department and all of other legal departments take proper action to eliminate or reduce this crime rate. This crime can be of any type social or civil but it cause problem when the world becomes familiar with it. Here we are labeling the top ten countries with highest reported crime rate

    1. United States

    [​IMG]

    It is the most astonishing reality we have found, that in our list we have the United States is at the top with the total figures of reported crime 11,877,218. This is really a shock that a country which is a super power and always talks about peace and anti terror is having such kind of situations internally. :facepalm:

    2. United Kingdom

    The largest and the great United Kingdom is at the second number in all of the countries with highest reported crime. This is a shock but a fact for all of us that a state like United Kingdom is having the total figure of reported crime is 6,523,706. There is really a need to control over the situation. :facepalm:

    3. Germany

    We have found the Germany on the number three in the highest reported crime with the figures of 6,507,394 in this year which is really a big figure. A lot of people became the victim of different criminal activities on daily bases and all of the law enforcement agencies are still struggling to eliminate these factors.

    4. France

    On the next number it is France, it is at the fourth position with the total reported crime of 3,771,850. Like the other countries France is also a well developed and establishes country but it is also facing the same situation with respect to the crime. It is observed that in all of these countries a well settled gang and mafias are working which are the causes of increase in crime rate.

    5. Russia
    A country with the eight largest economies of the world and which was a super power and still considered as the most powerful and developed state have a terrific reported crime of 2,952,370. With these figures the Great Russian Federation is at the fifth position in the top ten countries rated with respect to the highest crime. Besides all of the international achievements and technological developments the country is failed to come over with the criminal situation of the country.

    6. Japan
    With the total crime of 2,853,739, the technological leading country Japan is at the number six in the countries having highest crime rate. It is a fact that Japan has made a lot of achievements in the field of technology and ruling the technological world but besides this is also have a huge crime and criminal network. In this situation the country and its residents have to face a lot of issues and problems, not only the residents but the visitors also have to be careful while moving in the country. There are number of cases reported by the tourists that their luggage has been robbed.

    7. South Africa
    South Africa is at the number seven in our list with the total reported crime of 2,683,849. The country of 53 million people having eleven official languages is also having a huge crime rate in it. This crime rate includes the crimes and criminals from street robbers, thief and gangster to all of the major mafias and smugglers. Besides this there are approximately 500,000 women are being raped every year but these are not the reported rape cases at all. :facepalm:

    8. Canada
    A North American country with some of its amazing international representation is at the eight positions in the top countries with highest crime rate. The total reported crime of a year in Canada is 2,516,918. As a whole the police and law enforcement agencies are working on the elimination of crime but some of the rural and urban areas of the country having major gangs with deep roots and breeding such criminal activities. Besides robbery, murder and theft smuggling and black marketing is also common in Canada. Like the other developments country have developed itself for crime as well.

    9. Italy
    With the total reported crime of 2,231, 550 Italy is at ninth number in the top ten countries with highest crime rate. Traditionally, Italy is famous for its beauty and amazing infrastructure within water but the real face of its beauty is horrible and we can see it in this statistics. There are some of major mafias are working in Southern Italy and have jammed he lives of the people and gradually it is expanded to the United States. The nine percent of the total gross domestic production of Italy is earned by these mafias. It is at the 47th position in the 62 countries having highest murder rate and at the 43rd position in the top 65 countries with highest rape rate. :facepalm:

    10. India

    [​IMG]

    India is at the tenth position in the list of countries with the highest crime rate. The total number of reported crime in India is 1,764,630 in the last year. The main cause of this crime in India is its population and inflation, having a huge number of people and the failure to provide the proper earning resources to them is a default of the government. Besides this there are huge underworlds gangs are in India which are exploiting its roots and the parties of religious extremism are also creating criminals in the shape of extremist who murder the people from opposite religion or sect. majorly in the big centers of the country like Delhi and Mumbai the crime rate is higher than others. :ranger:

    Top 10 Countries With Highest Reported Crime Rate | Allzinfo.com
     
  4. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Top 10 Countries With Highest Reported Crime Rate

    S.No.:- Country: Total Crimes

    1 United States 11,877,218
    2 United Kingdom 6,523,706
    3 Germany 6,507,394
    4 France 3,771,850
    5 Russia 2,952,370
    6 Japan 2,853,739
    7 South Africa 2,683,849
    8 Canada 2,516,918
    9 Italy 2,231,550
    10 India 1,764,630

    Top 10 Countries With Highest Reported Crime Rate

    =>
    =>
    here again, something more to tell the high performing story of South Africa as below, which hardly has population closed to 50million but has handsomely outperformed India of 1.30 billion population in the list as below :ranger:

    =>
     
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  5. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Total Crimes Per 100,000 population for the above 3 Democratic Countries :thumb:

    1st; United States of America: 11,877,218/3100 = 3831.36

    2nd; United Kingdom/ Britain: 6,523,706/ 640 = 10,193.29 :tsk:

    3th; India: 1,764,630/12500 = 141.17 :india:

    and hence, in terms of Prison Population per 100,000 population, overall Pictures of the 2 largest Democracies of the world, India and USA, is as below. and with the influence of Western Culture on India, which IS mainly based on drinks and drugs, it will be interesting to see, how long will it really take for India to move from East to West in this picture as below :thumb:

     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2014
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  6. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

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    one more look we may have as below :ranger:

     
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  7. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Influence of Western Culture on Indian Society

    India is a secular country where the people have the freedom to practice any religion and also to convert into another religion of their choice. So, all the cultures are freely accepted and respected by the Indians. It’s an environment to cultivate or build oneself ethically, socially and in all other aspects that lead an all over human development. :india:

    Every culture is a combination of some good and bad features. All in one, culture means ‘a way of life’. Every geographical body has its own custom viz. culture. People of different nations are recognized by their culture. :thumb: One should be proud on its impressive traditions. It is the responsibility of all citizens to preserve their own ethnicity.

    Indian culture is richly known in other parts of the world since the ancient age. Its multi-diverse flavour has been consistently unique in its very own way. Manners, traditions, living and trading patterns etc. are one of the graceful components of Indian culture. The most important feature of Indian culture is its values. These values are deeply rooted within the heart, mind, body and soul of its dwellers. :coffee:

    But, the influence of western culture started in India during the 19th century when the british established their colony in the country.
    Western culture, considered as the most advanced culture on globe, has started surmounting its flavour on Indian roots. Western culture has always shown its influence on Indian society. This could be for the multiple reasons like fascination, dreamy autonomy etc., which are somehow absent in Indian culture. Western culture conveys and promotes the ideas and values of advanced civilization across people of India.

    There are ample of good things found in the western culture, which every Indian should proudly learn and adopt.:thumb: But what about the negative influences of the western culture? Every package comes with pros and cons. Indians should definitely use the culture strain before getting diluted under the flow of any cultural influence. The leading reasons for such impact are pursuit of wealth and power of Western media.

    The culture of India has been shaped not only by its long history, unique geography and diverse demography, but also by its ancient heritages. Regarded by some historians as the “oldest living civilization of Earth”, the Indian tradition dates back to 8,000 BC and has a continuous recorded history for over 2,500 years.

    Westernization should not affect the core traditions of Indian society but may change the lifestyle and apparent characteristics of the society with the graceful add-ons like punctuality, trustworthiness, loyalty, professionalism should be welcomed and adored. :ranger:

    These changes are like the betraying our old way of life, which we obtained through our ancestors. Updating is necessary but getting washed-off in influence is wide of the mark. If this continues, days will not be far away when the famous Indian civilization would be buried not by others but by the Indian themselves. :ranger:

    Due to globalization the rich culture of India is disappearing. The most impact is of western culture on India culture. Western culture is based more on materialistic factors where as our culture has a spiritual base.

    The culture of India is been disappearing by many ways the youths in India do not respect their elders, the families in India live separate. And thus have lost contacts with their other relatives the big point which is making the culture of India to disappear in bollywood the dressing style of the actresses, the slang word used in movies are been influenced the youth to bad step of life. The young ones try to act the same as these actors do which is very bad to the culture of India.

    The lack of morals, the lacking faith in God, having late night parties, the influence of drugs and alcohols, least interest in Indian languages like Sanskrit, Hindi, Celebrating mothers day, fathers day, valentine day, fools day etc rather than celebrating our Indian festivals and thus wasting their precious time of life, Thinking to be independent at an early age :facepalm:

    So, I strongly say that accept good from that and try to know our Indian culture more than u definitely change mind. :truestory:

    Western Culture Influence Indian Society | Palem Srikanth Reddy
     
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  8. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

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    India must Maintain and Reduce The Traditional Crime Rate, at any Price

    Japan must be considered as a Role Modal to build a Prosper India, with Lower Crime Rate too :india:

    here, we have a legend to learn from the mistakes of today's industrialized nations, and we find there are mainly 2 categories of Developed Nations. one with very low crime rate, which includes Japan, Taiwan, Singapore, Korea type Asian Industrialized nations. while on the other side we find US and many other Wealthy Countries gained wealth along with very high crime rate too, no matter how much Welfare/Social Security/Medicare etc they provide to their people. and India must learn from these nations, there must be a study on the high crime rate of US/West, before India become a Rich nation.

    we have data's of 2008 as below, before recession in US so it does mean that this analysis explains the peak of US, it had till 2008. and there must be a common consensus among all the political parties, systems of India that India must maintain 400 or below criminal incidents per 100,000 population in future too, even if it maintain low growth rate also, but we want crime rate of India to be lower than what it traditionally maintained till 2008, as below.

    for example, Indian politicians, bureaucrats, senior position holders in security agencies may sit altogether and discuss, "what if India register only 2% growth rate for the next 20 years, will it help us maintain the current crime rate, with a space to reduce it too? and even if we get (-)ve growth rate from today, is it a better option as compare to have high growth rate and then have a very high Crime Rate society like Rich US/West? or, we may learn something from Japan, which has Buddhist background, means having some similarities with Indian cultural background too, to maintain low crime rate, along with high Growth Rate :india:"

    =>

    The Role Modal of Asia, The Japan

    here we find Japan's prison rate at very close to India, even if its the most advanced nation of Asia, while owning the best technologies of world, which was developed by the Japanese people itself, (in contrast to USA which mostly hired migrant professionals.) and the reason behind it, the "Likelihood of being a Vitim" is itself very low at 13.11, the lowest due to their Cultural Background, i think. here we find Japan refusing to accept that being a rich nation means for high crime rate too :truestory:

    .
     
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  9. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

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    @Ray

    sir, here its a simple case, "the society where criterion of getting success in life isn't education, people are then more willing to commit crimes to go high in life/ have luxury in life." the very first conclusion of crime rate comparison among the above 3 democratic countries......
     
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  10. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

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    A Crime mainly Means for its Seriousness

    and i repeat, "Incarceration Rate is the best way to measure Crime Rate as we do know that long term imprisonment is applicable to serious crimes only. means, if there were few fighting on the streets then you would be released within days if no serious injuries. but if someone died, or someone was raped, then obviously you would go for a very long."

    its so simple that, there might be so many driving offenses which can result is penalty only in most of cases, while a crime does means for its seriousness, like robberies/ murders/ serious assaults/ rape/ drugs smuggling etc....... even having small amount of drugs for personal use isn't a punishable offense in Australia, but smuggling drugs does means for 10years+ imprisonment, and here we mainly look on the Incarceration Rate comparison.

    as we do know that even if many types of small crimes go unpunished in a developing country, like driving offenses etc, the major crimes like murders/rapes/robberies can't go unnoticed as we do have proper identities of civilians/IDs of people in developing countries like India/Indonesia/ Philippines/Vietnam type countries, and here we again find "Incarceration Rate" comparison of our interests :thumb:

     
  11. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Relationship of Drugs Consumption with US's Incarceration Rate


    here we need someone from US to give the reasons. we have a credible online warrior of US, @WGEwald , he may help us here.....

    while my own experience states, less money they have since 2008 Recession, then less drugs they consume since then this way, and then we find the curve as below on fall. check this curve declining since 2008 recession :tsk:



    => have a careful look on the curve as below and compare it with the above curve. the 2008 Recession, and then fall of Drugs consumption has a direct relation in fall of Incarceration Rate of US, as below. check the curve carefully :ranger:

    and yes, we do find Japan at the bottom as below.......

    =>

    and this is how "Welfare Society" of US is compared with a "non-Welfare" Society of India. we have a good example of Buddhist background Japan as below too, the most advanced/rich nation of Asia with owing the best technologies of world, to have an example/role modal to build future of India :india:

    United States incarceration rate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
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  12. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    There are too many Joe the Plumber and Sarah Palins.

    Can't blame them.

    They are the icons of their society inspite of way out opportunities and facilities.
     
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  13. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

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  14. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Hate groups, citizen militias surge in U.S. as race and economy fuel tensions

    WINSTON-SALEM, North Carolina — The number of hate and anti-government groups in the United States continued to rise last year, fueled by racial tensions, conspiracy theories and anger over economic inequality, according to a report by the Southern Poverty Law Center.

    The most explosive growth came from the so-called Patriot movement, whose adherents view the federal government as their enemy. :ranger:

    The Patriot movement reached a peak in 1996, a year after right-wing extremist Timothy McVeigh set off a truck bomb outside the Oklahoma City federal building, killing 168 people. McVeigh and a co-conspirator were convicted, and McVeigh was executed.

    The number of Patriot groups, a largely rural phenomenon sometimes referred to as the militia movement, increased to 1,274 groups in 2011 from 824 in 2010, the report released on Thursday said.

    The number of those organizations has swelled in recent years since the economy slumped into recession and Democratic President Barack Obama, the country’s first black president, was elected in 2008, said the law center, which has tracked extremist groups for three decades.

    A backlash against federal bail outs of the bank and auto industries, and discredited allegations that Obama was not born in the United States and therefore disqualified to be president, provided believers with the rationale to join such groups, according to the report.

    Heated political rhetoric from this year’s presidential campaign could attract more adherents, said Mark Potok, senior fellow at the center and editor of the report.

    “The campaign season has simply added fuel to the fire,” Potok said. These groups vehemently oppose Obama and abhor the possibility that he could be re-elected to a second term in November. “To them, that’s a horror show,” Potok said. The center counted 1,018 hate groups in the United States last year, up from 1,002 in 2010. The number of groups have been increasing since 2000, when the center counted 602.

    Potok said it was hard to gauge how many Americans are members of hate groups, but estimated the number was between 200,000 and 300,000 people.


    The U.S. election campaign season has simply added fuel to the fire

    The center also estimated that some 300,000 Americans were part of the so-called “sovereign citizens” movement who flout most laws, do not pay federal taxes and even refuse to obtain driver’s licenses.

    The report’s findings echoed comments last month in Washington by the FBI about a growing threat of violence by members of these “sovereign citizen” groups.

    Stuart McArthur, deputy assistant director in the FBI’s counterterrorism division, told a news conference that routine encounters with police can turn violent “at the drop of a hat.” He cited shootings of police officers after routine traffic stops in Arkansas and Texas the past two years.

    Convictions of such extremists, mostly for white-collar crimes such as fraud, increased to 18 each in 2010 and 2011 from 10 in 2009, the FBI said.

    Most members of hate groups and anti-government organizations have not committed crimes, Potok said. But the center’s report highlighted recent examples where authorities accused militia members of plotting violence.

    In one case, authorities accused four Georgia members of a militia group of plotting to obtain explosives and produce the deadly toxin ricin, with which they intended to attack government officials.

    In Michigan, seven members of a Midwestern militia group called the Hutaree are standing trial on charges that they plotted to kill police to spark a wider insurrection.

    The law center also found the number of groups specifically targeting gays and lesbians rose to 27 in 2011 from 17 in 2010, and the number of anti-Muslim groups jumped to 30 from 10. :ranger:

    But the number of so-called “nativist extremist” groups who harass people they suspect of being illegal immigrants appeared to be in decline. The number of those groups dropped to 184 in 2011 from 319 the year before.

    The center attributed the decline in part to the push in some states for laws aimed at cracking down on illegal immigrants, the report said. “Nativist groups have lost the wind in their sails as their issue has been co-opted by politicians,” Potok said.

    The Southern Poverty Law Center was formed in the early 1970s to defend the legal rights of African Americans following the civil rights reforms of the 1960s. It was instrumental in some convictions of members of white supremacist groups such as the Ku Klux Klan for civil rights abuses against blacks. It has broadened to other issues in recent years.

    Hate groups, citizen militias surge in U.S. as race and economy fuel tensions | National Post
     
  15. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

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    List of countries by intentional homicide rate

    we also have Murder rate as below. here, India won't be said doing good in this picture, while comparing "Absolute Number" of murders as below :ranger:
    => India tops world murder count - The Times of India

    but we do have Pakistan from this region here to put a competition with South Africa in this picture as below:-


    => @Ray

    here we do give a credit to China to keep the list better for whole Asia as below, with high population and low murder rate.....

     
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  16. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Rape Rate

    and yes, high performing USA, along with South Africa too, in this category has always been a news to world :ranger:

    here we can get data about India from the post#7, at around 1.5 per 100,000 population. which puts it among the East European countries like Belarus, Ukraine in the list as below

    Rape Statistics | Statistic Brain

    =>

    A Sharp Rise in Rape Cases in India

    here, for the year 2008

    Rapes in Welfare society of US = 93,934/ 3100 (100,000) = 30.3 :toilet:
    Rapes in non-Welfare society of India = 18,357/ 125,00 (100,000) = 1.47

    (considering population of US at 310 million and India 1.25billion.)


    and again we have Rape Statistics of India for 2011 as below

    and here, as per the above 2 news, we do see a 33% jump in rape numbers in India within just 3 years. (18,359 in year 2008 to 24,206 rapes by 2011)

    here, when did Ms Sunny Leone came to India, no offence but just a question :facepalm:

    isn't it good to keep people living in slum, not to dream for luxury life/fun, until we may reduce population of India, until India may provide a good life to them all? as discussed in the post#7 too?
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2014
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  17. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Afghanistan worst place in the world for women, but India in top five

    [​IMG]
    A woman works at a sunflower field at Kunwarpur village, east of Allahabad, India. Her country has been ranked the fourth worst in the world for women.

    Targeted violence against female public officials, dismal healthcare and desperate poverty make Afghanistan the world's most dangerous country in which to be born a woman, according to a global survey released on Wednesday.

    The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Pakistan, India and Somalia feature in descending order after Afghanistan in the list of the five worst states, the poll among gender experts shows.

    The appearance of India, a country rapidly developing into an economic super-power, was unexpected. It is ranked as extremely hazardous because of the subcontinent's high level of female infanticide and sex trafficking.

    Others were less surprised to be on the list. Informed about her country's inclusion, Somalia's women's minister, Maryan Qasim, responded: "I thought Somalia would be first on the list, not fifth."

    The survey has been compiled by the Thomson Reuters Foundation to mark the launch of a website, TrustLaw Woman, aimed at providing free legal advice for women's groups around the world.

    High maternal mortality rates, limited access to doctors and a "near total lack of economic rights" render Afghanistan such a threat to its female inhabitants. "Continuing conflict, Nato airstrikes and cultural practices combine to make Afghanistan a very dangerous place for women," said Antonella Notari, head of Women Change Makers, a group that supports women social entrepreneurs around the world.

    "Women who do attempt to speak out or take on public roles that challenge ingrained gender stereotypes of what is acceptable for women to do or not, such as working as policewomen or news broadcasters, are often intimidated or killed."

    The "staggering levels of sexual violence" in the lawless east of the DRC account for its second place in the list. One recent US study claimed that more than 400,000 women are raped there each year. The UN has called Congo the rape capital of the world.

    "Rights activists say militia groups and soldiers target all ages, including girls as young as three and elderly women," the survey reports, "They are gang raped, raped with bayonets and some have guns shot into their vaginas."

    Pakistan is ranked third on the basis of cultural, tribal and religious practices harmful to women. "These include acid attacks, child and forced marriage and punishment or retribution by stoning or other physical abuse," the poll finds.

    Divya Bajpai, reproductive health adviser at the International HIV/Aids Alliance, added: "Pakistan has some of the highest rates of dowry murder, so-called honour killings and early marriage." According to Pakistan's human rights commission, as many as 1,000 women and girls die in honour killings annually.

    India is the fourth most dangerous country. "India's central bureau of investigation estimated that in 2009 about 90% of trafficking took place within the country and that there were some 3 million prostitutes, of which about 40% were children," the survey found.

    Forced marriage and forced labour trafficking add to the dangers for women. "Up to 50 million girls are thought to be 'missing' over the past century due to female infanticide and foeticide,", the UN population fund says, because parents prefer to have young boys rather than girls.

    Somalia, a state in political disintegration, suffers high levels of maternal mortality, rape, female genital mutilation and limited access to education and healthcare.

    Qasim added: "The most dangerous thing a woman in Somalia can do is to become pregnant. When a woman becomes pregnant her life is 50-50 because there is no antenatal care at all. There are no hospitals, no healthcare, no nothing.

    "Add to that the rape cases that happen on a daily basis, and female genital mutilation being done to every single girl in Somalia. Add to that famine and drought. Add to that the fighting [which means] you can die any minute, any day."

    Monique Villa, the chief executive of the Thomson Reuters Foundation, said: "Hidden dangers – like a lack of education or terrible access to healthcare – are as deadly, if not more so, than physical dangers like rape and murder which usually grab the headlines.

    "In Afghanistan, for instance, women have a one in 11 chance of dying in childbirth. In the top five countries, basic human rights are systematically denied to women.

    "Empowering women tackles the very roots of poverty. In the developing world when a woman works, her children are better fed and better educated because they spend their money for their family."

    The survey was based on responses from more than 200 aid professionals, academics, health workers, policymakers, journalists and development specialists chosen for their expertise in gender issues.

    Each country was also ranked in terms of six risk factors including: health, discrimination and lack of access to resources, cultural and religious practices, sexual violence, human trafficking and conflict-related violence.

    In terms of individual risk categories, Afghanistan was deemed to be the most dangerous for health, economic/discrimination and non-sexual violence; the Congo is most plagued by rape and sexual violence; and India has most problems with trafficking.

    "You have to look at all the dangers to women, all the risks women and girls face," said Elisabeth Roesch, who works on gender-based violence for the International Rescue Committee in Washington.

    "If a woman can't access healthcare because her healthcare isn't prioritised, that can be a very dangerous situation as well."

    The TrustLaw website has been in existence for some time, linking up local NGOs and social entrepreneurs with established law firms who are prepared to offer legal advice on a pro-bono basis. The groups are vetted by Transparency International.

    More than 450 law firms are already involved including some from China. Among those that have recently benefited have been the charity Riders for Health, which delivers medicine to remote villages, and reviewed its contracts in Nigeria.

    Afghanistan worst place in the world for women, but India in top five | World news | The Guardian
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2014
  18. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

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    @Ray

    its really hard for India to be ranked high in Western Ranking, good to see India in top five in some of their rankings. :peace:

    here, a typical western mind is used to please India here, even if its below Somalia, at least its above Pakistan :facepalm:


    in fact, I have habit of reading western ranking stating, "indian women ranked below pakistani women as they don't sit on the nude beaches, similar to western women." "indian kids on the second last rank by UN, as they dont take drugs from schooling, including mass sex since 13-14 year age too." "india is more violent than US with 'staggering' 799 deaths by guns last years while the same score was well above 11,000 in US by guns last year." bla bla

    Bluffs of Superiority, based on publicity of greatness, without any credibility or proper educational background


    while the state of Welfare Society of US is as below :facepalm:

     
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  19. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

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    NATIONAL POLICY FOR THE EMPOWERMENT OF WOMEN(2001)

    Introduction

    The principle of gender equality is enshrined in the Indian Constitution in its Preamble, Fundamental Rights, Fundamental Duties and Directive Principles. The Constitution not only grants equality to women, but also empowers the State to adopt measures of positive discrimination in favour of women.

    Within the framework of a democratic polity, our laws, development policies, Plans and programmes have aimed at women’s advancement in different spheres. From the Fifth Five Year Plan (1974-78) onwards has been a marked shift in the approach to women’s issues from welfare to development. In recent years, the empowerment of women has been recognized as the central issue in determining the status of women. The National Commission for Women was set up by an Act of Parliament in 1990 to safeguard the rights and legal entitlements of women. The 73rd and 74th Amendments (1993) to the Constitution of India have provided for reservation of seats in the local bodies of Panchayats and Municipalities for women, laying a strong foundation for their participation in decision making at the local levels.

    1.3 India has also ratified various international conventions and human rights instruments committing to secure equal rights of women. Key among them is the ratification of the Convention on Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) in 1993.

    1.4 The Mexico Plan of Action (1975), the Nairobi Forward Looking Strategies (1985), the Beijing Declaration as well as the Platform for Action (1995) and the Outcome Document adopted by the UNGA Session on Gender Equality and Development & Peace for the 21st century, titled "Further actions and initiatives to implement the Beijing Declaration and the Platform for Action" have been unreservedly endorsed by India for appropriate follow up.

    1.5 The Policy also takes note of the commitments of the Ninth Five Year Plan and the other Sectoral Policies relating to empowerment of Women.

    1.6 The women’s movement and a wide-spread network of non-Government Organisations which have strong grass-roots presence and deep insight into women’s concerns have contributed in inspiring initiatives for the empowerment of women.

    1.7 However, there still exists a wide gap between the goals enunciated in the Constitution, legislation, policies, plans, programmes, and related mechanisms on the one hand and the situational reality of the status of women in India, on the other. This has been analyzed extensively in the Report of the Committee on the Status of Women in India, "Towards Equality", 1974 and highlighted in the National Perspective Plan for Women, 1988-2000, the Shramshakti Report, 1988 and the Platform for Action, Five Years After- An assessment"

    1.8 Gender disparity manifests itself in various forms, the most obvious being the trend of continuously declining female ratio in the population in the last few decades. Social stereotyping and violence at the domestic and societal levels are some of the other manifestations. Discrimination against girl children, adolescent girls and women persists in parts of the country.

    1.9 The underlying causes of gender inequality are related to social and economic structure, which is based on informal and formal norms, and practices.

    1.10 Consequently, the access of women particularly those belonging to weaker sections including Scheduled Castes/Scheduled Tribes/ Other backward Classes and minorities, majority of whom are in the rural areas and in the informal, unorganized sector – to education, health and productive resources, among others, is inadequate. Therefore, they remain largely marginalized, poor and socially excluded.

    Goal and Objectives

    1.11 The goal of this Policy is to bring about the advancement, development and empowerment of women.The Policy will be widely disseminated so as to encourage active participation of all stakeholders for achieving its goals. Specifically, the objectives of this Policy include

    (i) Creating an environment through positive economic and social policies for full development of women to enable them to realize their full potential

    (ii) The de-jure and de-facto enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedom by women on equal basis with men in all spheres – political, economic, social, cultural and civil

    (iii) Equal access to participation and decision making of women in social, political and economic life of the nation

    (iv) Equal access to women to healthcare, quality education at all levels, career and vocational guidance, employment, equal remuneration, occupational health and safety, social security and public office etc.

    (v) Strengthening legal systems aimed at elimination of all forms of discrimination against women

    (vi) Changing societal attitudes and community practices by active participation and involvement of both men and women.

    (vii) Mainstreaming a gender perspective in the development process.

    (viii) Elimination of discrimination and all forms of violence against women and the girl child; and

    (ix) Building and strengthening partnerships with civil society, particularly women’s organizations. :thumb:


    Policy Prescriptions

    Judicial Legal Systems

    Legal-judicial system will be made more responsive and gender sensitive to women’s needs, especially in cases of domestic violence and personal assault. New laws will be enacted and existing laws reviewed to ensure that justice is quick and the punishment meted out to the culprits is commensurate with the severity of the offence.

    2.2 At the initiative of and with the full participation of all stakeholders including community and religious leaders, the Policy would aim to encourage changes in personal laws such as those related to marriage, divorce, maintenance and guardianship so as to eliminate discrimination against women. :thumb:

    2.3 The evolution of property rights in a patriarchal system has contributed to the subordinate status of women. The Policy would aim to encourage changes in laws relating to ownership of property and inheritance by evolving consensus in order to make them gender just.

    Decision Making

    3.1 Women’s equality in power sharing and active participation in decision making, including decision making in political process at all levels will be ensured for the achievement of the goals of empowerment. All measures will be taken to guarantee women equal access to and full participation in decision making bodies at every level, including the legislative, executive, judicial, corporate, statutory bodies, as also the advisory Commissions, Committees, Boards, Trusts etc. Affirmative action such as reservations/quotas, including in higher legislative bodies, will be considered whenever necessary on a time bound basis. Women–friendly personnel policies will also be drawn up to encourage women to participate effectively in the developmental process.

    Mainstreaming a Gender Perspective in the Development Process

    4.1 Policies, programmes and systems will be established to ensure mainstreaming of women’s perspectives in all developmental processes, as catalysts, participants and recipients.Wherever there are gaps in policies and programmes, women specific interventions would be undertaken to bridge these. Coordinating and monitoring mechanisms will also be devised to assess from time to time the progress of such mainstreaming mechanisms. Women’s issues and concerns as a result will specially be addressed and reflected in all concerned laws, sectoral policies, plans and programmes of action.

    Economic Empowerment of women

    Poverty Eradication

    5.1 Since women comprise the majority of the population below the poverty line and are very often in situations of extreme poverty, given the harsh realities of intra-household and social discrimination, macro economic policies and poverty eradication programmes will specifically address the needs and problems of such women. There will be improved implementation of programmes which are already women oriented with special targets for women. Steps will be taken for mobilization of poor women and convergence of services, by offering them a range of economic and social options, along with necessary support measures to enhance their capabilities

    Micro Credit

    5.2 In order to enhance women’s access to credit for consumption and production, the establishment of new, and strengthening of existing micro-credit mechanisms and micro-finance institution will be undertaken so that the outreach of credit is enhanced. Other supportive measures would be taken to ensure adequate flow of credit through extant financial institutions and banks, so that all women below poverty line have easy access to credit.

    Women and Economy

    5.3 Women’s perspectives will be included in designing and implementing macro-economic and social policies by institutionalizing their participation in such processes. Their contribution to socio-economic development as producers and workers will be recognized in the formal and informal sectors (including home based workers) and appropriate policies relating to employment and to her working conditions will be drawn up. Such measures could include:

    Reinterpretation and redefinition of conventional concepts of work wherever necessary e.g. in the Census records, to reflect women’s contribution as producers and workers.

    Preparation of satellite and national accounts.

    Development of appropriate methodologies for undertaking (i) and (ii) above.


    Globalization

    Globalization has presented new challenges for the realization of the goal of women’s equality, the gender impact of which has not been systematically evaluated fully. However, from the micro-level studies that were commissioned by the Department of Women & Child Development, it is evident that there is a need for re-framing policies for access to employment and quality of employment. Benefits of the growing global economy have been unevenly distributed leading to wider economic disparities, the feminization of poverty, increased gender inequality through often deteriorating working conditions and unsafe working environment especially in the informal economy and rural areas. Strategies will be designed to enhance the capacity of women and empower them to meet the negative social and economic impacts, which may flow from the globalization process.

    Women and Agriculture

    5.5 In view of the critical role of women in the agriculture and allied sectors, as producers, concentrated efforts will be made to ensure that benefits of training, extension and various programmes will reach them in proportion to their numbers. The programmes for training women in soil conservation,social forestry, dairy development and other occupations allied to agriculture like horticulture, livestock including small animal husbandry, poultry, fisheries etc. will be expanded to benefit women workers in the agriculture sector.

    Women and Industry

    5.6 The important role played by women in electronics, information technology and food processing and agro industry and textiles has been crucial to the development of these sectors. They would be given comprehensive support in terms of labour legislation, social security and other support services to participate in various industrial sectors.

    5.7 Women at present cannot work in night shift in factories even if they wish to. Suitable measures will be taken to enable women to work on the night shift in factories. This will be accompanied with support services for security, transportation etc.

    Support Services

    5.8 The provision of support services for women, like child care facilities, including crèches at work places and educational institutions, homes for the aged and the disabled will be expanded and improved to create an enabling environment and to ensure their full cooperation in social, political and economic life. Women-friendly personnel policies will also be drawn up to encourage women to participate effectively in the developmental process.

    Social Empowerment of Women

    Education

    6.1 Equal access to education for women and girls will be ensured. Special measures will be taken to eliminate discrimination, universalize education, eradicate illiteracy, create a gender-sensitive educational system, increase enrolment and retention rates of girls and improve the quality of education to facilitate life-long learning as well as development of occupation/vocation/technical skills by women.Reducing the gender gap in secondary and higher education would be a focus area. Sectoral time targets in existing policies will be achieved, with a special focus on girls and women, particularly those belonging to weaker sections including the Scheduled Castes/Scheduled Tribes/Other Backward Classes/Minorities.Gender sensitive curricula would be developed at all levels of educational system in order to address sex stereotyping as one of the causes of gender discrimination.

    Health

    6.2 A holistic approach to women’s health which includes both nutrition and health services will be adopted and special attention will be given to the needs of women and the girl at all stages of the life cycle. The reduction of infant mortality and maternal mortality, which are sensitive indicators of human development, is a priority concern.This policy reiterates the national demographic goals for Infant Mortality Rate (IMR), Maternal Mortality Rate (MMR) set out in the National Population Policy 2000.Women should have access to comprehensive,affordable and quality health care. Measures will be adopted that take into account the reproductive rights of women to enable them to exercise informed choices, their vulnerability to sexual and health problems together with endemic, infectious and communicable diseases such as malaria, TB, and water borne diseases as well as hypertension and cardio-pulmonary diseases. The social, developmental and health consequences of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases will be tackled from a gender perspective.

    6.3 To effectively meet problems of infant and maternal mortality, and early marriage the availability of good and accurate data at micro level on deaths, birth and marriages is required. Strict implementation of registration of births and deaths would be ensured and registration of marriages would be made compulsory.

    6.4 In accordance with the commitment of the National Population Policy (2000) to population stabilization, this Policy recognizes the critical need of men and women to have access to safe, effective and affordable methods of family planning of their choice and the need to suitably address the issues of early marriages and spacing of children.Interventions such as spread of education, compulsory registration of marriage and special programmes like BSY should impact on delaying the age of marriage so that by 2010 child marriages are eliminated.

    6.5 Women’s traditional knowledge about health care and nutrition will be recognized through proper documentation and its use will be encouraged. The use of Indian and alternative systems of medicine will be enhanced within the framework of overall health infrastructure available for women.

    Nutrition

    6.6 In view of the high risk of malnutrition and disease that women face at all the three critical stages viz., infancy and childhood, adolescent and reproductive phase, focussed attention would be paid to meeting the nutritional needs of women at all stages of the life cycle. This is also important in view of the critical link between the health of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women with the health of infant and young children. Special efforts will be made to tackle the problem of macro and micro nutrient deficiencies especially amongst pregnant and lactating women as it leads to various diseases and disabilities.

    6.7 Intra-household discrimination in nutritional matters vis-à-vis girls and women will be sought to be ended through appropriate strategies. Widespread use of nutrition education would be made to address the issues of intra-household imbalances in nutrition and the special needs of pregnant and lactating women. Women’s participation will also be ensured in the planning, superintendence and delivery of the system.

    Drinking Water and Sanitation

    6.8 Special attention will be given to the needs of women in the provision of safe drinking water, sewage disposal, toilet facilities and sanitation within accessible reach of households, especially in rural areas and urban slums.Women’s participation will be ensured in the planning, delivery and maintenance of such services.

    Housing and Shelter

    6.9 Women’s perspectives will be included in housing policies, planning of housing colonies and provision of shelter both in rural and urban areas. Special attention will be given for providing adequate and safe housing and accommodation for women including single women, heads of households, working women, students, apprentices and trainees.

    Environment

    6.10 Women will be involved and their perspectives reflected in the policies and programmes for environment, conservation and restoration. Considering the impact of environmental factors on their livelihoods, women’s participation will be ensured in the conservation of the environment and control of environmental degradation. The vast majority of rural women still depend on the locally available non-commercial sources of energy such as animal dung, crop waste and fuel wood. In order to ensure the efficient use of the seenergy resources in an environmental friendly manner, the Policy will aim at promoting the programmes of non-conventional energy resources. Women will be involved in spreading the use of solar energy, bio gas, smokeless chulahs and other rural application so as to have a visible impact of these measures in influencing eco system and in changing the life styles of rural women.

    Science and Technology

    6.11Programmes will be strengthened to bring about a greater involvement of women in science and technology. These will include measures to motivate girls to take up science and technology for higher education and also ensure that development projects with scientific and technical inputs involve women fully. Efforts to develop a scientific temper and awareness will also be stepped up. Special measures would be taken for their training in areas where they have special skills like communication and information technology. Efforts to develop appropriate technologies suited to women’s needs as well as to reduce their drudgery will be given a special focus too.


    Women in Difficult Circumstances

    6.12 In recognition of the diversity of women’s situations and in acknowledgement of the needs of specially disadvantaged groups, measures and programmes will be undertaken to provide them with special assistance. These groups include women in extreme poverty, destitute women, women in conflict situations, women affected by natural calamities, women in less developed regions, the disabled widows, elderly women, single women in difficult circumstances, women heading households, those displaced from employment, migrants, women who are victims of marital violence, deserted women and prostitutes etc. :india:

    Violence against women

    7.1 All forms of violence against women, physical and mental, whether at domestic or societal levels, including those arising from customs, traditions or accepted practices shall be dealt with effectively with a view to eliminate its incidence. Institutions and mechanisms/schemes for assistance will be created and strengthened for prevention of such violence , including sexual harassment at work place and customs like dowry; for the rehabilitation of the victims of violence and for taking effective action against the perpetrators of such violence. A special emphasis will also be laid on programmes and measures to deal with trafficking in women and girls.

    Rights of the Girl Child

    8.1 All forms of discrimination against the girl child and violation of her rights shall be eliminated by undertaking strong measures both preventive and punitive within and outside the family. These would relate specifically to strict enforcement of laws against prenatal sex selection and the practices of femalefoeticide, female infanticide, child marriage, child abuse and child prostitution etc. Removal of discrimination in the treatment of the girl child within the family and outside and projection of a positive image of the girl child will be actively fostered. There will be special emphasis on the needs of the girl child and earmarking of substantial investments in the areas relating to food and nutrition, health and education, and in vocational education. In implementing programmes for eliminating child labour, there will be a special focus on girl children.

    Mass Media

    9.1 Media will be used to portray images consistent with human dignity of girls and women. The Policy will specificallystrive to remove demeaning, degrading and negative conventional stereotypical images of women and violence against women. Private sector partners and media networks willbe involved at all levels to ensure equal access for women particularly in the area of information and communication technologies. The media would be encouraged to develop codes of conduct, professional guidelines and other self regulatory mechanisms to remove gender stereotypes and promote balanced portrayals of women and men.

    Operational Strategies

    Action Plans


    10.1 All Central and State Ministries will draw up time bound Action Plans for translating the Policy into a set of concrete actions, through a participatoryprocess ofconsultation with Centre/State Departments of Women and Child Development and National /State Commissions for Women. The Plans will specifically including the following: -

    i) Measurable goals to be achieved by 2010.

    ii) Identification and commitment of resources.

    iii) Responsibilities for implementation of action points.

    iv) Structures and mechanisms to ensure efficient monitoring, review and gender impact assessment of action points and policies.

    v) Introduction of a gender perspective in the budgeting process.

    10.2 In order to support better planning and programme formulation and adequate allocation of resources, Gender Development Indices (GDI) will be developed by networking with specialized agencies. These could be analyzed and studied in depth. Gender auditing and development of evaluation mechanisms will also be undertaken along side.

    10.3 Collection of gender disaggregated data by all primary data collecting agencies of the Central and State Governments as well as Research and Academic Institutions in the Public and Private Sectors will be undertaken. Data and information gaps in vital areas reflecting the status of women will be sought to be filled in by these immediately. All Ministries/Corporations/Banks and financial institutions etc will be advised to collect, collate, disseminate and maintain/publish data related to programmes and benefits on a gender disaggregated basis. This will help in meaningful planning and evaluation of policies.

    Institutional Mechanisms

    11.1 Institutional mechanisms, to promote the advancement of women, which exist at the Central and State levels, will be strengthened. These will be through interventions as may be appropriate and will relate to, among others, provision of adequate resources, training and advocacy skills to effectively influence macro-policies, legislation, programmes etc. to achieve the empowerment of women.

    11.2 National and State Councils will be formed to oversee the conversationalist of the Policy on a regular basis. The National Council will be headed by the Prime Minister and the State Councils by the Chief Ministers and be broad in composition having representatives from the concerned Departments/Ministries, National and State Commissions for Women, Social Welfare Boards, representatives of Non-Government Organizations, Women’s Organisations, Corporate Sector, Trade Unions, financing institutions,academics, experts and social activists etc. These bodies will review the progress made in implementing the Policy twice a year. The National Development Council will also be informed of the progress of the programme undertaken under the policy from time to time for advice and comments.

    11.3 National and State Resource Centres on women will be established with mandates for collection and dissemination of information, undertaking research work, conducting surveys, implementing training and awareness generation programmes, etc. These Centers will link up with Women’s Studies Centres and other research and academic institutions through suitable information networking systems.

    11.4 While institutions at the district level will be strengthened, at the grass-roots, women will be helped by Government through its programmes to organize and strengthen into Self-Help Groups (SHGs) at the Anganwadi/Village/Town level. The women’s groups will be helped to institutionalize themselves into registered societies and to federate at the Panchyat/Municipal level. These societies will bring about synergistic implementation of all the social and economic development programmes by drawing resources made available through Government and Non-Government channels, including banks and financial institutions and by establishing a close Interface with the Panchayats/ Municipalities.


    Resource Management

    12.1 Availability of adequate financial, human and market resources to implement the Policy will be managed by concerned Departments, financial credit institutions and banks, private sector, civil society and other connected institutions. This process will include:

    (a) Assessment of benefits flowing to women and resource allocation to the programms relating to them through an exercise of gender budgeting. Appropriate changes in policies will be made to optimize benefits to women under these schemes :thumb:

    (b) Adequate resource allocation to develop and promote the policy outlined earlier based on (a) above by concerned Departments.

    (c) Developing synergy between personnel of Health, Rural Development, Education and Women & Child Development Department at field level and other village level functionaries’

    (d) Meeting credit needs by banks and financial credit institutions through suitable policy initiatives and development of new institutions in coordination with the Department of Women & Child Development.

    12.2 The strategy of Women’s Component Plan adopted in the Ninth Plan of ensuring that not less than 30% of benefits/funds flow to women from all Ministries and Departments Will be implemented effectively so that the needs and interests of women and girls are addressed by all concerned sectors. The Department of Women and Child Development being the nodal Ministry will monitor and review the progress of the implementation of the Component Plan from time to time, in terms of both quality and quantity in collaboration with the Planning Commission.

    12.3 Efforts will be made to channelize private sector investments too, to support programmes and projects for advancement of women

    Legislation

    13.1 The existing legislative structure will be reviewed and additional legislative measures taken by identified departments to implement the Policy. This will also involve a review of all existing laws including personal, customary and tribal laws, subordinate legislation, related rules as well as executive and administrative regulations to eliminate all gender discriminatory references. The process will be planned over a time period 2000-2003. The specific measures required would be evolved through a consultation process involving civil society, National Commission for Women and Department of Women and Child Development. In appropriate cases the consultation process would be widened to include other stakeholders too.

    13.2 Effective implementation of legislation would be promoted by involving civil society and community. Appropriate changes in legislation will be undertaken, if necessary.

    13.3 In addition, following other specific measures will be taken to implement the legislation effectively.

    (a) Strict enforcement of all relevant legal provisions and speedy redressal of grievances will be ensured, with a special focus on violence and gender related atrocities.

    (b) Measures to prevent and punish sexual harassment at the place of work, protection for women workers in the organized/ unorganized sector and strict enforcement of relevant laws such as Equal Remuneration Act and Minimum Wages Act will be undertaken,

    (c) Crimes against women, their incidence, prevention, investigation, detection and prosecution will be regularly reviewed at all Crime Review fora and Conferences at the Central, State and District levels. Recognised, local, voluntary organizations will be authorized to lodge Complaints and facilitate registration, investigations and legal proceedings related to violence and atrocities against girls and women.

    (d) Women’s Cells in Police Stations, Encourage Women Police Stations Family Courts, Mahila Courts, Counselling Centers, Legal Aid Centers and Nyaya Panchayats will be strengthened and expanded to eliminate violence and atrocities against women.


    (e) Widespread dissemination of information on all aspects of legal rights, human rights and other entitlements of women, through specially designed legal literacy programmes and rights information programmes will be done.

    Gender Sensitization :thumb:

    14.1 Training of personnel of executive, legislative and judicial wings of the State, with a special focus on policy and programme framers, implementation and development agencies, law enforcement machinery and the judiciary, as well as non-governmental organizations will be undertaken. Other measures will include:

    (a) Promoting societal awareness to gender issues and women’s human rights.

    (b) Review of curriculum and educational materials to include gender education and human rights issues

    (c) Removal of all references derogatory to the dignity of women from all public documents and legal instruments.

    (d) Use of different forms of mass media to communicate social messages relating to women’s equality and empowerment.

    Panchayati Raj Institutions

    15.1 The73rd and 74th Amendments (1993) to the Indian Constitution have served as a breakthrough towards ensuring equal access and increased participation in political power structure for women. The PRIs will play a central role in the process of enhancing women’s participation in public life. The PRIs and the local self Governments will be actively involved in the implementation and execution of the National Policy for Women at the grassroots level.

    Partnership with the voluntary sector organizations

    16.1 The involvement of voluntary organizations, associations, federations, trade unions, non-governmental organizations, women’s organizations, as well as institutions dealing with education, training and research will be ensured in the formulation, implementation, monitoring and review of all policies and programmes affecting women. Towards this end, they will be provided with appropriate support related to resources and capacity building and facilitated to participate actively in the process of the empowerment of women.

    International Cooperation

    17.1 The Policy will aim at implementation of international obligations/commitments in all sectors on empowerment of women such as the Convention on All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD+5) and other such instruments. International, regional and sub-regional cooperation towards the empowerment of women will continue to be encouraged through sharing of experiences, exchange of ideas and technology, networking with institutions and organizations and through bilateral and multi-lateral partnerships.


    NATIONAL POLICY FOR THE EMPOWERMENT OF WOMEN

    NATIONAL POLICY FOR THE EMPOWERMENT OF WOMEN
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2014
  20. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

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    => India Ranks Lower Than Pakistan on Gender Equality - India Real Time - WSJ

    A Short Summary about State of Women in India

    1st; there is 'no' law in India which puts Indian Women down to men. if you find any then let us know, Indian government may change it. :thumb:

    2nd; Women have more opportunities than men in India, in terms of scholarships and reservations in jobs/ exams. also, "more laws" women have to defend their interests in India, check :thumb:

    3rd; there are many and many social organizations running at present, which help Indian women in life, including helping widows/ divorcee women get married again. but yes, there is no social security as India is a developing country, its true :thumb:

    4th; now days divorce is quite commonly seen in India too. and a mother living with kids and looking for a boy friend/ new husband is not unusual now days, specially in metros, get it confirmed .
    and having consensual sex above age 18, with any cast or religion is not an offence in India......

    5th; India has a culture background, we proud on, which first means to build Sanskar/ Character in kids first, regardless a boy or a girl, and this is the 'backbone' of Indian society. the "Character Background" of Hindus....

    for example, i never had any bad habit in India, never any drinking or girl in India till the age 26, when i moved to Australia for foreign studies, while it was quite usual for me in Australia. as this is how we live in western nations. does this means, "Indian men like me are ranked lower than Pakistani men?"

    if you may, then learn from our "Character Background" or leave us. just don't destroy other parts of the world, if you can't build your own society

    'character' is something different, other than run over any girl you find in pub, can't live without drinks/drugs so this is what you want to do in rest of the world too
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2014
  21. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

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    The Measure of Empowered Women

    I made 4 posts on Mr Obama's Twitter about women empowerment as below. i think these posts may be kept here also, to keep its a record in this thread too :thumb:

    Mr Barack Obama's statement on Twitter on 23rd January 2014, ""You can judge a nation, and how successful it will be, based on how it treats its women and its girls." —President Obama"

    My Comment:-

    1st; thats true. a strong nation is defined on the level it gives priority to its weak part of society. like women/schedule caste in india

    2nd; only women/schedule caste in India get scholarships/ reservations in exams/jobs. and empowering women means, one day they will help others

    3rd; one and there is only one measure of "Empowered Women", whether they reach a day when they may help other weak parts of society too :thumb:

    4th; and Im strongly against encouraging girls only to fcuk here there, but not giving them right advises to go high in life/career :thumb:
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2014

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