Heroes of the Motherland

Discussion in 'Defence & Strategic Issues' started by A.V., May 9, 2009.

  1. A.V.

    A.V. New Member

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    this particular sticky thread is dedicated to the war heroes of the country who made us proud over the ages please mention their acts of bravery in as much detail as you can .

    remember this thread is a tribute to the brave men to act accordingly please.
     
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  3. SATISH

    SATISH DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

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    Lt. Arun Khetarpal


    On 16 December 1971, the Squadron Commander of ‘B’ Squadron, the Poona Horse asked for reinforcement as the Pakistani Armour which was superior in strength, counter attacked at Jarpal, in the Shakargarh Sector. On hearing this transmission, Second Lieutenant Arun Khetarpal who was in ‘A’ Squadron, voluntarily moved along with his troop, to assist the other squadron. En route, while crossing the Basantar River, Second Lieutenant Arun Khetarpal and his troop came under fire from enemy strong points and RCL gun nests that were still holding out. Time was at a premium and as critical situation was developing in the ‘B’ Squadron sector, Lieutenant Arun Khetarpal, threw caution to the winds and started attacking the impending enemy strong points by literally charging them, overrunning the defence works with his tanks and capturing the enemy infantry and weapon crew at pistol point. In commander of his troop was killed. Second Lieutenant Arun Khetarpal continued to attack relentlessly until all enemy opposition was overcome and he broke through towards the ‘B’ Squadron position, just in time to see the enemy tanks pulling back after their initial probing attack on this squadron. He was so carried away by the wild enthusiasm of battle and the impetus of his own headlong dash that he started chasing the withdrawing tanks and even managed to shoot and destroy one. Soon thereafter, the enemy reformed with a squadron of armour for a second attack and this time they selected the sector held by Second Lieutenant Arun Khetarpal and two other tanks as the points for their main effort. A fierce tank fight ensured ten enemy tanks were hit and destroyed of which Second Lieutenant Arun Khetarpal was severely wounded. He was asked to abandon his tank but he realised that the enemy though badly decimated was continuing to advance in his sector of responsibility and if he abandoned his tank the enemy would break through, he gallantry fought on and destroyed another enemy tank, At this stage his tank received a second hit which resulted in the death of this gallant officer.

    Second Lieutenant Arun Khetarpal was dead but he had, by his intrepid valour saved the day; the enemy was denied the breakthrough he was so desperately seeking. Not one enemy tank got through.

    Second Lieutenant Arun Khetarpal had shown the best qualities of leadership, tenacity of purpose and the will to close in with the enemy. This was an act of courage and self-sacrifice far beyond the call of duty.
     
  4. SATISH

    SATISH DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

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    MAJOR SHAITAN SINGH
    13 KUMAON (IC 7990)
    Major Shaitan Singh was commanding a company of an infantry battalion deployed at Rezang La in the Chushul sector at a height of about 17,000 feet. The locality was isolated from the main defended sector and consisted of five platoon-defended position. On 18 November 1962, the Chinese forces subjected the company position to heavy artillery, mortar and small arms fire and attacked it in overwhelming strength in several successive waves. Against heavy odds, our troops beat back successive waves of enemy attack. During the action, Major Shaitan singh dominated the scene of operations and moved at great personal risk from one platoon post to another sustaining the morale of his hard-pressed platoon posts. While doing so he was seriously wounded but continued to encourage and lead his men, who, following his brave example fought gallantly and inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy. For every man lost to us, the enemy lost four or five. When major Shaitan Singh fell disabled by wounds in his arms and abdomen, his men tried to evacuate him but they came under heavy machine-gun fire. Major Shaitan Singh then ordered his men to leave him to his fate in order to save their lives.

    Major Shaitan Singh’s supreme courage, leadership and exemplary devotion to duty inspired his company to fight almost to the last man. In the Indo-China war of 1962, the Ahirs (almost all of them hailing from the Ahirwal region of Southern Haryana) of 13 Kumaon Regiment set an unparallel example in the military history of India by defending their motherland at Rezang La in Ladakh district of Jammu & Kashmir.

    The battle of Rezang La, a ridge overlooking the strategic Chushul plains in Ladakh, is one of the most glorious chapters in the history of the Indian army and has been compared by some military historians with the famed battle of Thermopylae. In the unequal war of 1962 against the Chinese where the Indian army rarely stood to fight, the Ahir Charlie Company from 13 Kumaon, led by Major Shaitan Singh, decided that until they were alive the Chinese weren’t going to have a look-in on Chushul, at 17,000 ft. Of the 120 defenders, only three survived, seriously wounded. The rest, including Major Shaitan Singh (who was awarded Param Vir Chakra), were discovered after the winter, frozen, mostly holding their weapons but with no ammunition. This was a genuine ‘last man-last round’ defense and many times more Chinese were killed, the evidence again being frozen bodies on the slopes. Of the 120 soldiers, 114 were Haryanavi Ahirs.

    This battle inspired MS Sathyu’s (1964) gut-wrenching classic movie, 'Haqeeqat', starring Dharmendra and Balraj Sahni. On this horrific battle, Major-General Ian Cardozo, in his book ‘Param Vir, Our Heroes In Battle’ writes, “When Rezang La was later revisited dead jawans were found in the trenches still holding on to their weapons... every single man of this company was found dead in his trench with several bullet or splinter wounds. The 2-inch mortar man died with a bomb still in his hand. The medical orderly had a syringe and bandage in his hands when the Chinese bullet hit him... Of the thousand mortar bombs with the defenders all but seven had been fired and the rest were ready to be fired when the (mortar) section was overrun.”

    The heroes who were awarded the Vir Chakra in 1962 defending Rezang La were Naik Hukum Chand (posthumous), Naik Gulab Singh Yadav, Lance-Naik Ram Singh (posthumous), Sub. Ram Kumar and Sub. Ram Chander. All hailed from the Rewari district of Haryana, where a Rezang La memorial has been placed in their memory in Gudiani village.
     
  5. SATISH

    SATISH DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

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    Col Hoshiar Singh

    During the Indo-Pak war of 1971, the 3rd battalion of the Grenadiers was given the task of establishing a bridgehead across the Basantar River in the Shakargarh Sector from 15 - 17 December 1971. The river was covered with deep minefields on both sides and protected by well-fortified defence by the Pakistani army. Major Hoshiar Singh, Commander of 'C' Company, was ordered to capture the Pakistani locality of Jarpal. The Pakistani army reacted and put in sharp counter attacks. Major Hoshiar Singh went from trench to trench, motivating his command and encouraging his men to stand fast and fight as a result his company repulsed all the attacks inflicting heavy casualties on the Pakistani army. Though seriously wounded, Major Hoshiar Singh refused to be evacuated till the ceasefire. Throughout this operation, Major Hoshiar Singh displayed most conspicuous gallantry, indomitable fighting spirit and leadership in the highest traditions of the Army. He was honoured with the highest Indian wartime gallantry medal, the Param Vir Chakra. He was also Mentioned-in-Despatches.
     
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  6. Su-47

    Su-47 Regular Member

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    Major Som-Nath Sharma - 1947

    Major Som Nath Sharma (1923–1947) was the first recipient of the Param Vir Chakra, the highest Indian gallantry award. He was awarded the medal posthumously for his bravery in the Kashmir operations in November 1947. He died while evicting Pakistani infiltrators and raiders from Srinagar Airport during the Indo-Pak war of 1947-48 in Kashmir. He belonged to the 4th Kumaon Regiment.

    Major Som Nath Sharma was born on 31 January 1923 in Dadh, Kangara District of Himachal Pradesh. He came from a well-known military family, his father, Major-General Amar Nath Sharma, was also a military officer as were his brothers Lt. General Surindar Nath Sharma (retired as the Engineer-in-chief) and General Vishwa Nath Sharma (retired as Chief of Army Staff, 1988-1990), and his sister Major Kamla Tewari (Medical Doctor).He did his schooling in Sherwood College, Nainital. He was commissioned into the 4th Kumaon Regiment of the Indian Army (then British-Indian Army) on 22 February 1942. He also saw combat during the second World War in the Arakan Operations.

    His company was airlifted to Srinagar on 31 October 1947. His right hand was in a plaster cast as a result of injuries sustained in the hockey field previously but he insisted on being with his company in combat and was given permission to go. On 3 November 1947, Major Somnath Sharma's company (D Company of 4 Kumaon) was ordered on a fighting patrol to Badgam Village in the Kashmir Valley. He was soon surrounded by the enemy from three sides and his company sustained heavy casualties from the ensuing artillery bombardment. He realized the importance of holding onto his position as both the city of Srinagar and the airport would be vulnerable if it were lost. Under heavy fire and outnumbered seven to one, he urged his company to fight bravely, often exposing himself to danger as he ran from post to post.

    When heavy casualties adversely affected the firing power of his company, Major Sharma, with his right hand in plaster, took upon himself the task of filling the magazines and issuing them to men, operating light machine guns. While he was busy fighting the enemy, a mortar shell exploded on the ammunition near him. His last message to Brigade HQ received a few moments before he was killed was: "The enemy are only 50 yards from us. We are heavily outnumbered. We are under devastating fire. I shall not withdraw an inch but will fight to our last man and our last round."
     
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  7. Su-47

    Su-47 Regular Member

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    Karam Singh-1948

    Tithwal in Jammu and Kashmir was captured on 23 May 1948. After that date, the enemy made numerous attempts to recapture Richmar Gali, and thence Tithwal. On 13 October 1948, coinciding with Id, the enemy decided to launch a brigade attack to retake Richmar Gali, and bypassing Tithwal, advance into the Srinagar Valley . Lance Naik Karam Singh was commanding a section at Richmar Gali.

    The enemy commenced its attack with heavy shelling of guns and mortars. The fire was so accurate that not a single bunker in the platoon locality was left unscathed.

    Communication trenches caved in. Bravely, Lance Naik karam Singh went from bunker to bunker, giving succor to the wounded and urging the men to fight.

    The enemy launched eight separate attacks that day. In one such attack, the enemy managed to obtain a foothold in the platoon locality. Immediately, Lance Naik Karam Singh, who was severely wounded by then, with a few men, hurled himself in a counter-attack and evicted the enemy after a close quarter encounter which accounted for many enemy dead, having been dispatched by the bayonet.

    Lance Naik Karam Singh proved himself to be a dauntless leader of men in crisis. Nothing could subdue him and no amount of fire or hardship could break his spirit.
     
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  8. Su-47

    Su-47 Regular Member

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    Rama Raghoba Rane - 1948

    On 8 April 1948, Second Lieutenant Rama Raghoba Rane, Bombay Engineers, was ordered to be in charge of the mine and roadblock clearing party at Mile 26 on the Naushera-Rajouri road which passes through very hilly country.

    At 1100 hours, on that date near Nadpur South, just as Second Lieutenant Rane and his party were waiting near the tanks to start the work of clearing the mines ahead, the enemy started heavy mortaring of the area, with the result that two men of the mine-clearing party were killed and five others including Second Lieutenant Rane were wounded. The officer at once reorganized his party and started work for the tanks to go on to their position. Throughout the day he was near the tanks under heavy enemy machine-gun and mortar fire.

    After the capture of Barwali Ridge at about 1630 hours, although knowing that the enemy had not been completely cleared of the area, Second Lieutenant Rane took his party ahead and started making a diversion for the tanks to proceed. He worked on till 2200 hours that night in full view of the enemy and under heavy machine-gun fire.

    On 9 April he again started work at 0600 hours and worked on till 1500hrs when the diversion was ready for the tanks to proceed. As the armoured column advanced, he got into the leading carrier and proceeded ahead. After proceeding about half a mile he came across a roadblock made of pine trees. He at once dismounted and blasted the trees away. The advance continued. Another 300 yards and the same story was repeated. By this time it was getting on to 1700 hours. The road was curving round the hill like a snake. The next roadblock was a demolished culvert. Second Lieutenant Rane again got on with the job. Before he could start work, the enemy opened up with their machine-guns, but with super courage and leadership he made a diversion and the column proceeded ahead. The roadblocks were becoming numerous but he blasted his way through. It was now 1815 hours, and light was fading fast. The carrier came across a formidable roadblock of five big pine trees surrounded by mines and covered by machine-gun fire. He started removing the mines and was determined to clear the roadblock but the armoured column commander appreciating the situation got the column into a harbour area.

    On 10 April 1948 at 0445 hours, Second Lieutenant Rane again started work on the roadblock in spite of machine-gun fire with the support of one troops of tanks. With sheer will power he cleared this roadblock by 0630hours. The next thousand yards was a mass of roadblocks and blasted embankments. That was not all. The enemy had the whole area covered with machine-gun fire but with superhuman efforts, in spite of having been wounded, with cool courage and exemplary leadership and complete disregard for personal life, he cleared the road by 1030 hours.

    The armoured column proceeded ahead and got off the road into the riverbed of the Tawi but Second Lieutenant Rane continued clearing the road for the administrative column. The tanks reached Chingas by 1400 hours. Second Lieutenant Rane appreciating that the opening of the road was most vital, continued working without rest or food till 2100 hours that night.

    On 11 April 1948, he again started work at 0600 hours and opened the road to Chingas by 1100 hours. He worked on that night till 2200 hours clearing the road ahead.
     
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  9. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Captain Vikram Batra

    Captain Vikram Batra (September 9, 1974 - July 7, 1999) was an officer of the Indian Army, posthumously awarded the Param Vir Chakra, India's highest award for valour, for his actions during the 1999 Kargil War in Kashmir between India and Pakistan.

    Captain Vikram Batra was awarded the Param Vir Chakra, India's highest military honor on 15 August 1999, the 52nd anniversary of India's independence. His father Mr. G.L. Batra received the honor for his deceased son from the President of India, the late K.R. Narayanan.
    Captain Vikram Batra, 13 JAK Rifles, and his Delta Company was given the task of recapturing Point 5140. Nicknamed Sher Shah ('Lion King' in Hindi) for his unstinting courage, he decided to lead the rear, as an element of surprise would help stupefy the enemy. He and his men ascended the sheer rock-cliff, but as the group neared the top, the enemy pinned them on the face of the bare cliff with machine gun fire. Captain Batra, along with five of his men, climbed up regardless and after reaching the top, hurled two grenades at the machine gun post. He single-handedly killed three enemy soldiers in close combat. He was seriously injured during this, but insisted on regrouping his men to continue with the mission. Inspired by the courage displayed by Captain Batra, the soldiers of 13 JAK Rifles charged the enemy position and captured Point 5140 at 3:30 a.m. on 20 June 1999. His company is credited with killing at least eight Pakistani soldiers and recovering a heavy machine gun.
    The capture of Point 5140 set in motion a string of successes, such as Point 5100, Point 4700, Junction Peak and Three Pimples. Along with fellow Captain Anuj Nayyar, Batra led his men to victory with the recapture of Point 4750 and Point 4875. He was killed when he tried to rescue an injured officer during an enemy counterattack against Point 4875 in the early morning hours of 7 July 1999. His last words were, "Jai Mata Di." ('Hail the Goddess of Victory'). For his sustained display of the most conspicuous personal bravery and leadership of the highest order in the face of the enemy, Captain Vikram Batra was awarded the Param Vir Chakra.
     
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  10. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Kuldip Singh Chandpuri

    Kuldip Singh Chandpuri held the post of a Major in Indian Army's 23rd Bn, Punjab Regiment during the time of 1971 war when Pakistan army attacked the Longewala post in the state of Rajasthan (India). Kuldip Singh Chandpuri and his company numbered 120 soldiers and were responsible for defending the post of Longewala in Rajasthan, India. Kuldip Singh Chandpuri and his men were at considerable odds against the 2000-3000 strong assault force of the 51st Infantry Brigade of the Pakistani Army- backed by the 22nd Armored Regiment. Despite heavy odds Kuldip Singh Chandpuri and his company did not abandon the post and held the 2000-3000 strong Pakistani Army at bay for the full night until the Indian Air Force arrived in the morning.
    Major Kuldip Singh Chandpuri exhibited dynamic leadership in holding his men and command together against an incomparable attacking force and in leading his men to hold the attacking Pakistan Army from progressing ahead. Showing exceptional courage and determination, Kuldip Singh Chandpuri first decided not to abandon the command and he inspired his men moving from bunker to bunker encouraging them in beating back the enemy till reinforcements arrived. In this heroic defense, Kuldip Singh Chandpuri and his 23rd Bn Punjab Regiment (120 Soldier) inflicted heavy casualties on the Pakistani Army (2000-3000 Soldiers) and forced them to retreat leaving behind twelve tanks. In this action, Major Chandpuri displayed conspicuous gallantry and leadership and was awarded Maha Vir Chakra (MVC) by the Indian Army.
    The entire battle was portrayed in the superhit movie "Border (film)" in which Sunny Deol played the role of Major Kuldip Singh Chandpuri. Major Kuldip Singh Chandpuri retired as a Brigadier from the Indian Army.
     
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  11. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Nirmal Jit Singh Sekhon

    Flying Officer Nirmal Jit Singh Sekhon was an officer of the Indian Air Force and the posthumous recipient of the only Param Vir Chakra awarded to an Indian Air Force Personnel. Fg. Off Sekhon's award was in recognition of his lone and fatal defence of Srinagar Air Base during an air raid during the 1971 Indo-Pak War. Fg Offr Sekhon, a Sikh, was born on July 17, 1943 at village Rurka in Ludhiana District, Punjab. He was the son of Warrant Officer Hon. Flight Lieutenant Trilok Singh Sekhon. He was commissioned into the Indian Air Force on June 4, 1967 as a Flying Officer.

    On 14 December 1971, Srinagar airfield was attacked by a wave of six PAF F-86 jets. Flying Officer Sekhon was on readiness duty at that time. Soon the enemy aircraft attacked the airfield, strafing ground targets. Under heavy fire from the attacking aircraft, Flying Officer Sekhon was able to achieve takeoff in his Folland Gnat and he engaged the attacking Sabres. In the ensuing air battle Sekhon scored a direct hit on one Sabre and set another ablaze.The latter was seen heading away towards Rajauri, trailing smoke.The four remaining Pakistani Sabres pressed the attack, and after a lengthy dog-fight at tree-top level Sekhon's aircraft was hit, and he was killed. The remaining Pakistani aircraft returned to Pakistan without pressing the attack on Srinagar airfield and its surrounding areas. The bravery, flying skill and determination displayed by Flying Officer Sekhon earned him the highest wartime gallantry medal, Param Vir Chakra. His skill was later praised in an article by Salim Baig Mirza, the pilot who shot him down.
     
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  12. Su-47

    Su-47 Regular Member

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    Abdul Hamid - 1965

    At 0800 hours on 10 September 1965 Pakistan forces launched an attack with a regiment of Patton tanks on a vital area ahead of village Cheema on the Bhikkiwind road in the Khem Karam Sector. Intense artillery shelling preceded the attack. The enemy tanks penetrated the forward position by 0900 hours. Realising the grave situation, Company Quarter Master Havildar Abdul Hamid who was commander of a RCL gun detachment moved out to a flanking position with his gun mounted on a jeep, under intense enemy shelling and tank fire. Taking an advantageous position, he knocked out the leading enemy tank and then swiftly changing his position, he sent another tank up in flames. By this time the enemy tanks in the area spotted him and brought his jeep under concentrated machine-gun and high explosive fire. Undeterred, Company Quarter Master Havildar Abdul Hamid kept on firing on yet another enemy tank with his recoilless gun. While doing so, he was mortally wounded by an enemy high explosive shell.

    Havildar Abdul Hamid’s brave action inspired his comrades to put up a gallant fight and to beat back the heavy tank assault by the enemy. His complete disregard for his personal safety during the operation and his sustained acts of bravery in the face of constant enemy fire were a shining example not only to his unit but also to the whole division and were in the highest traditions of the Indian Army.
     
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  13. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Captain Mahendra Nath Mulla

    Captain Mahendra Nath Mulla was an officer of the Indian Navy and the Captain of the INS Khukri, who went down with his ship during the 1971 war on the old tradition, "captains don't abandon their ships.". He was awarded Maha Vir Chakra posthumously for displaying conspicuous gallantry and dedication to duty.
    He was born on 15 May 1926 in Gorakhpur in Uttar Pradesh and was commissioned in the Indian Navy on 01 May 1948.
    In 1971 Indo-Pakistani War Captain Mulla was a senior officer of frigates squadron of Indian Navy. He was given command of INS Khukri and was tasked to locate and destroy a Pakistani submarine in North Arabian Sea. During these operations on the night of 9 December 1971,INS "Khukri" was hit by torpedoes fired by a Pakistan submarine and sank.
    Captain Mulla decided to ask the crew to abandon the ship and without regard to his personal safety he supervised the arrangements for rescue of his shipmates in a very cool, calm and methodical manner.
    His action and behaviour and the example he set have been in keeping with highest tradition of Military of India.
     
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  14. Su-47

    Su-47 Regular Member

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    Lieutenant Colonel Ardeshir Burzonji Tarapore - 1965

    On 11 September 1965, the Poona Horse Regiment under the command of Lieutenant Ardeshir Burzarji Tarapore was assigned the task of delivering the main armoured thrust for capturing, Phillora in the Sialkot in Pakistan. As a preliminary to making a surprise attack on Phillora from the rear, the regiment was thrusting between Phillora and Chawinda when it was suddenly counter-attacked by the enemy’s heavy armour from Wazirwali. Lieutenant Colonel AB Tarapore who was then at the head of his regiment, defied the enemy’s charge held his ground and gallantry attacked Phillora with one of his squadrons supported by an infantry battalion. Though under continuous enemy tank and artillery fire, Lieutenant Colonel Tarapore remained unperturbed throughout this action, and when wounded refused to be evacuated.

    On 14th September 1965, though still wounded he again led his regiment to capture Wazirwali. Such was his grit and determination that unmindful of his injury he, again gallantry led his regiment and captured Jassoran and Butur – Dograndi on 16 September. His own tank was hit several times, but despite the odds he maintained his pivots in both these places and thereby allowed the supporting infantry to attack Chawinda from the rear.

    Inspired by his leadership, the regiment fiercely attacked the enemy’s heavy armour destroying approximately 60 enemy tanks at a cost of only 9 tank casualties, and when Lieutenant Colonel AB Tarapore was mortally wounded the regiment continue to defy the enemy.

    The valour displayed by Lieutenant Colonel AB Tarapore in this heroic again, which lasted six days, was in keeping with the highest traditions of the Indian Army.
     
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  15. Su-47

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    Major Dhan Singh Thapa - 1962

    Major Dhan Singh Thapa was in command of a forward post in Ladakh. On 20 October it was attacked by the Chinese in overwhelming strength after being subjected to intensive artillery and mortar bombardment. Under his gallant command, the greatly outnumbered most repulsed the attack, inflicting heavy casualties on the aggressors. The enemy attacked again in greater numbers after heavy shelling by artillery and mortar fire. Under the leadership of Major Thapa, his men repulsed this attack also with heavy losses to the enemy.

    The Chinese attacked for the third time, now with tanks to support the infantry. The post had already suffered large numbers of casualties in the earlier two attacks. Though considerably reduced in number it held out to the last. When it was finally overrun by overwhelming numbers of the enemy, Major Thapa got out of his trench and killed several of the enemy in hand-to-hand fighting before he was finally overpowered by Chinese soldiers.

    Major Thapa’s cool courage, conspicuous fighting qualities and leadership were in the highest traditions of our Army.
     
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  16. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Yogendra Singh Yadav

    Grenadier Yogender Singh Yadav, 18 Grenadiers, in the early morning hours of 4 July 1999 was part of the Commando 'Ghatak' Platoon tasked to capture three strategic bunkers on Tiger Hill. The approach was a vertical cliff face, snowbound at 16,500 feet. Grenadier Yadav, volunteering to lead the assault, was climbing the cliff face and fixing the ropes for further assault on the feature. Half-way up, an enemy bunker opened up machine gun and rocket fire. His Platoon Commander and two others fell to the heavy volume of automatic fire. Realising the enormity of the situation, he continued to scale the sheer cliff face alone through a volley of fire. In spite of having been hit by three bullets in his groin and shoulder, he climbed the remaining 60 feet and reached the top. He crawled up to the bunker critically injured and lobbed a grenade killing four Pakistani soldiers and neutralising enemy fire. This act was directly instrumental in facilitating the rest of the platoon in climbing up the cliff face.[1]
    Grievously injured but with reckless disregard to personal safety, Grenadier Yadav now charged on to the second bunker and neutralised it with two of his colleagues in fierce hand-to-hand combat, killing three Pakistani soldiers. This extraordinarily act motivated the rest of the platoon who quickly traversed the treacherous terrain and, braving hostile fire, charged onto the enemy to capture Tiger Hill, a vital objective. For his sustained display of bravery, Grenadier Yogender Singh Yadav was awarded the Param Vir Chakra, India's highest medal for gallantry.

    The Param Vir Chakra was announced for Yadav posthumously, but it was soon discovered that he was recuperating in a hospital, and it was his namesake that had been slain in the mission.
     
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  17. Su-47

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    Captain Gurbachan Singh Salaria - 1961

    On 5 December 1961, 3/1 Gorkha Rifles was ordered to clear a roadblock established by the gendarmerie at a strategic roundabout at Elizabethville , Katanga . The plan was that one company with 2 Swedish armoured cars would attack the position frontally and Captain Gurbachan Singh Salaria with two sections of Gorkhas and two Swedish armoured personnel carriers would advance towars this roadblock from the airfield to act as a cutting-off force.

    Captain Salaria with his small force arrived at a distance of 1500 yards from the roadblock at approximately 1312 hours on 5 December 1961 and came under heavy automatic and small-arms fire from an undetected enemy position dug in on his right flank. The enemy also had two armoured cars and about 90 men opposing Captain Salaria’s small force.

    Captain Salaria appreciating that he had run into a subsidiary roadblock and ambush and that this enemy force might reinforce the strategic roundabout and thus jeopardize the main operation, decided to remove this opposition. He led a charge with bayonets, khukris, and grenades supported by a rocket launcher. In this gallant engagement, Captain Salaria killed 40 of the enemy and knocked out the two armoured cars. This unexpected bold action completely demoralized the enemy who fled despite their numerical superiority and protected positions.

    Captain Salaria was wounded in his neck by a burst of automatic fire but continued to fight until he collapsed due ot profuse bleeding. Captain Salaria’s gallant action prevented any enemy movement of the enemy force towards the main battle scene and thus contributed very largely to the success of the main battalion’s action at the roundabout and prevented the encirclement of UN Headquarters in Elizabethville. Captain Salaria subsequently died of his wounds.

    Captain Salaira’s personal example, utter disregard for personal safety and dauntless leadership inspired his small but gallant force of sixteen Gorkhas to hold on to their position, dominate the enemy and to inflict heavy casualties despite the enemy’s superiority in numbers and tactical position.

    Captain Gurbachan Singh Salaria’s leadership, courage, and unflinching devotion to duty and disregard for personal safety were in the best traditions of our Army.
     
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  18. Su-47

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    Naik Jadu Nath Singh - 1948

    Naik Jadu Nath Singh, a Rathore Rajput, was born on November 21, 1916 in Shahjahanpur, Uttar Pradesh. Singh was serving in the 1st Battalion of the Rajput Regiment (now the 4th Battalion in the Brigade of Guards)[1] won the Param Vir Chakra posthumously for his heroic actions in the Jammu and Kashmir operations in February, 1948.

    On February 6 in early 1948, a show of strength took place at Naushera between armed tribesmen and units of the Indian Army. The tribal force supported by the Pakistani Army was repulsed twice but they attacked a third time with increased numbers and added strength. Naik Jadu Nath Singh rushed out of his trench alone with a sten gun in his hand and he then opened devastating fire on the raiders when they came within 15 yards of the Indian posts.[2] The raiders were taken by shock and surprise and as a direct result, they wavered and then fled in wild confusion. The outpost was saved but Jadu Nath Singh was hit by 8 enemy bullets and fell down dead immediately.[3]

    For this ultimate act of personal sacrifice for the sake of the nation, Naik Jadu Nath Singh was decorated with the nation's highest award of gallantry.
     
  19. Su-47

    Su-47 Regular Member

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    Company Havildar Major Piru Singh - 1948

    Company Havildar Major Piru Singh (born 20 May 1918, Rajputana, India) was a soldier in the British Indian Army. He died in service during the Indo-Pakistani War of 1947. He was posthumously awarded the Param Vir Chakra, India's highest award for valour in the face of the enemy.


    Company Havildar Major Piru Singh, was born on 20 May 1918 in Rajasthan. He was enrolled in the 6 Rajputana Rifles on 20 May 1936. During the Jammu & Kashmir operations in summer of 1948, Pakistani raiders mounted a strong counter offensive in the Tithwal sector. The enemy also forced the Indian Army to vacate their forward positions across river Kishanganga. After the setback, Indian troops took position on the Tithwal ridge. At this juncture, 6 Rajputana Rifles was moved from Uri to Tithwal to strengthen the 163 Bde in its impending offensive in the sector. The Indian offensive commenced on 11 July 1948. The operation went on well till July 15th. The recon reports, however, revealed that the enemy was holding a high feature in the area and that its capture was essential for making any further progress. Further ahead lay another feature also held in strength by the enemy.

    The 6 Rajputana Rifles was assigned the task of securing these two features. The 'D' Company was to secure the first feature. The 'C' Company was to capture the second feature after the 'D' Company had carried out its task. The 'D' Company launched its attack on the objective at 0130 hrs on July 18th. The path to the objective was about one metre wide with deep ravines on either side. Overlooking this narrow path were the hidden enemy bunkers. The company was subjected to heavy fire and with half an hour it suffered 51 casualties. During this battle, CHM Singh was with the leading section of the company, more than half of which was mowed down by the devastating fire of the enemy. He rushed forward to deal with the enemy medium machine gun post which was playing havoc with his troops. Enemy grenade splinters ripped open his clothes and wounded several parts of his body. But this did not deter him. He still continued the advance, shouting the battle cry, "Raja Ramchandra Ki Jai". Rushing forward he bayonetted the crew of the enemy MMG, with his own sten gun, silenced the menacing gun and occupied the post. By this time all his companions lay behind either dead or wounded.

    The responsibility of clearing the enemy from the hill feature lay with him alone. Bleeding profusely he inched forward to attack the second enemy MMG post. At this juncture a grenade wounded him in the face. The blood dripping from his face almost blinded him. By now all the sten gun ammunition with him had been spent. He courageously crawled out of the occupied enemy trench and hurled grenades at the next enemy post. CHM Singh then jumped into another trench and bayonetted two enemy soldiers to death. As CHM Singh, emerged out of the second trench to charge on the third enemy bunker, he was hit in head by a bullet and was seen dropping on the edge of the enemy trench. There was an explosion in the trench which showed that the grenade had done its work. By then CHM Piru Singh's wound had proved fatal. "He paid with his life for his singularity brave act, but he left for the rest of his comrades a unique example of single-handed bravery and determined cold courage. The country is grateful," wrote Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru to Mrs. Tarawati, 75-year old mother of Company Havildar Major Piru Singh, "for this sacrifice made in the service of the Motherland, and it is our prayer that this may give you some peace and solace." Company Havildar Major Piru Singh was honoured with the highest war-time gallantry medal, Param Vir Chakra, posthumously.
     
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  20. Su-47

    Su-47 Regular Member

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    Subedar Joginder Singh - 1962

    Subedar Joginder Singh was the commander of a platoon of the Sikh Regiment holding a defensive position at a ridge near Tongpen La in NEFA. At 0530 hours on 23 October 1962, the Chinese opened a very heavy attack on the Bumla axis with the intention of breaking through to Towang. The leading battalion of the enemy attacked the ridge in three waves, each about 200 strong. Subedar Joginder Singh and his men mowed down the first wave, and the enemy was temporarily halted by the heavy losses it suffered. Within a few minutes, a second wave came over and was dealt with similarly. But the platoon had, by then, lost half its men.

    Subedar Joginder Singh was wounded in the thigh but refused to be evacuated. Under his inspiring leadership the platoon stubbornly held its ground and would not withdraw.

    Meanwhile the position was attacked for the third time. Subedar Joginder Singh himself manned a light machine-gun and shot down a number of the enemy. The Chinese however continued to advance despite heavy losses. When the situation became untenable Subedar Joginder Singh and the few men that were left in the position fixed bayonets and charged the advancing Chinese, bayoneting a number of them before he and his comrades were overpowered. Throughout this action, Subedar joginder Singh displayed devotion to duty, inspiring leadership and bravery of the highest order.
     
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  21. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Manoj Kumar Pandey

    Lieutenant Manoj Kumar Pandey was the son of Gopi Chand Pandey, Gomti Nagar, Lucknow-Uttar Pradesh, who was awarded Param Vir Chakra for his courage and leadership during adverse times.

    He was commissioned in the 1/11 Gurkha Rifles of the Indian Army. He forced back the intruders on June 11, 1999 at Batalik Sector in the Kargil war. He led his men to capture the Jubar top which was considered as important due to its strategic location. Quickly sizing up the situation, the young officer led his platoon along a narrow, treacherous ridge that led to the enemy position.
    While still short of the objective, the enemy fired upon the Indian soldiers effectively stalling the Indian attack. Displaying great courage, he surged ahead of his troops and charged at the enemy with a full throated battle cry through a hail of bullets.
    Although wounded in the shoulder and leg, he pressed on his solitary charge with grim determination, until he closed in on the first bunker. Then in ferocious hand-to-hand combat, he killed two of the enemy and cleared the first bunker. It was the turning point. Inspired by their leader's spontaneous valour, the troops charged at the enemy and fell upon them. Unmindful of his grievous wounds, he rushed from bunker to bunker urging his men on. Critically bleeding, he collapsed at the final bunker and finally succumbed to his injuries. But by this time he had already captured the bunker with his men.

    Lieutenant Manoj Kumar Pandey took part in a series of boldly led attacks during Operation Vijay; forcing back the intruders with heavy losses in Battlik including the capture of Jabbar Top.
    On the night of 2/3 July 1999 during the advance to Khalubar as his platoon approached its final objective, it came under heavy and intense enemy fire from the surrounding heights. Lieutenant Pandey was tasked to clear the interfering enemy positions to prevent his battalion from getting day lighted, being in a vulnerable position. He quickly moved his platoon to an advantageous position under intense enemy fire, sent one section to clear the enemy positions from the right and himself proceeded to clear the enemy positions from the left.

    Fearlessly assaulting the first enemy position, he killed two enemy personnel and destroyed the second position by killing two more. He was injured on the shoulder and legs while clearing the third position. Undaunted and without caring for his grievous injuries, he continued to lead the assault on the fourth position urging his men and destroyed the same with a grenade, even as he got a fatal burst on his forehead.
    His last words were, "Na Chodnu" (Don't Spare Them).
    This singular daredevil act of Lieutenant Pandey provided the critical firm base for the companies, which finally led to capture of Khalubar. The officer, however, succumbed to his injuries.
    Lieutenant Manoj Kumar Pandey, thus, displayed most conspicuous bravery, indomitable courage, outstanding leadership and devotion to duty and made the supreme sacrifice in the highest traditions of the Indian Army.
     
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