Hate campaign against Ahmadiyya Islamic minority in south London

Discussion in 'China' started by ajtr, Oct 23, 2010.

  1. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Hate campaign discovered against south London Ahmadiyya Islamic minority


    An international hate campaign by Islamic fundamentalists against a minority sect has spread to Britain and is causing a dangerous rift in south London’s Muslim community.

    The situation has been likened to the "beginnings of the Holocaust" by a leading expert who is urging the police to act.

    Lord Avebury, the long-serving vice-chairman of the Parliamentary Human Rights Group, said the extremist views were being imported from Pakistan and compared the vilification of Ahmadiyya Muslims with the beginnings of the Holocaust.

    Our investigation has revealed shocking examples of Ahmadi residents, businessmen and politicians being demonised and ostracised by UK Islamic fundamentalist group Khatme Nabuwat (KN).

    Ahmadi-owned businesses have been boycotted and face ruin, while employers have been pressurised into sacking Ahmadi workers.

    The hate campaign even infected the General Election result after a campaign to discourage Muslims voting for an Ahmadi Liberal Democrat candidate in Tooting.

    There are an estimated 13,000 Ahmadi Muslims living and working in south west London, who were drawn to the area after its first mosque was built in Southfields.

    Ahmadiyya Muslims differ from mainstream Islam by believing the second coming of the Messiah has already happened and is embodied by their founder, Mirza Ghulam Ahmad.

    Their two main mosques are the London Mosque, built in 1926 in Gressenhall Road, Southfields, and the massive Bait-ul-Fatah mosque in Morden, built in 2003 – which their website claims is the largest mosque in Western Europe.

    Since then, many Ahmadis who have fled religious persecution in Pakistan have come to live in Merton, Wandsworth, Kingston and Lambeth.

    Since being established in 1884, the movement is followed by 160m people in 190 countries worldwide and actively promotes humanitarian efforts under the motto: “Love for all, hatred for none”.

    They have a highly active public relations team, which within the past year has promoted community initiatives on behalf of the entire Muslim community, such as an advertising campaign launched in February on London’s bus network.
     
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  3. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Officials Announce Plan to Relocate Ahmadiyah Families to a Deserted Island


    Jakarta. A district head in West Nusa Tenggara announced plan to relocate 20 Ahmadiyah families to a deserted island, a move many say is both discriminatory and inhumane.

    “We are trying to protect Ahmadiyah members,” Zaini Arony, district head of West Lombok, said on Monday, as quoted by Antara.

    Zaini said he had discussed the matter with religious figures and members of society, adding that it had been agreed that Ahmadiyah members would be relocated to an island in Sekotong subdistrict.

    He claimed the local government feared a repeat of an incident in February 2006 when thousands of mainstream Muslims burned homes belonging to Ahmadiyah members in the district.

    The incidents left as many as 137 people homeless, all of whom had to be escorted by police officers to a temporary shelter in the provincial capital, Mataram.

    In August, at least 20 families left the shelter and returned to the district. Zaini said their return was rejected by a number of groups.

    Zafrullah Pontoh, the president of the Indonesian Ahmadiyah Congregation (JAI), told the Jakarta Globe that the West Lombok government had never discussed the matter with the sect. “The local government is trying to banish Ahmadiyah from West Lombok,” he said.

    Followers of Ahmadiyah, a sect founded in India in 1889, profess that the group’s founder, Mirza Ghulam Ahmad, is the last prophet, a belief that runs counter to mainstream Islamic beliefs that reserve that claim for the Prophet Muhammad.

    The nation’s highest authority on Islamic affairs, the Indonesian Council of Ulema (MUI), issued a fatwa in 2005 against the Ahmadiyah, calling its teachings blasphemous. And the government issued a joint ministerial decree in 2008 banning its members from practicing their faith in public or spreading its beliefs.

    Ulil Abshar Abdalla, founder of the Liberal Islam Network and a Democratic Party politician, said the government must remain neutral and not support calls of intolerance against Ahmadiyah from mainstream Muslim groups.

    “It needs time to correct religious indoctrination [in mainstream Muslim] that spur hatred towards Ahmadiyah. It needs time to reach cultural maturity to accept different views,” he said.

    “However, I am saddened that the government is supporting this cultural immaturity and making it a political policy.”
     
  4. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Worshippers told at Tooting Islamic Centre to boycott Ahmadiyya shops


    Ahmadi shopkeepers face financial ruin after clerics demanded a boycott of their shops.

    Imam Suliman Gani, of the TIC, admitted he personally pleaded with the owner of the Lahore Halal Meat in Tooting not to sell his business to an Ahmadi man.

    He said: “Since the Qadianis are routinely deceptive about their religion, there was a potential risk of Muslims being offered meat that wasn’t necessarily halal.

    “Can you imagine the uproar in the Jewish community if it was found that a shop selling purportedly kosher food was not doing so?

    “If there is any deception involved in the provision of halal meat, naturally, we will prefer to err on the side of caution.”

    Mr Gani offered no evidence to support claims the meat might be non-halal and later admitted if the meat came from the same supplier as before [which it did] “there would be no issue”.

    One leaflet, the origin of which is not known but was posted on the wall of the Streatham Mosque, called for a boycott on Lahore Halal.

    Another Ahmadi butcher, who came to London in 2001 after fleeing Pakistan, won an employment tribunal last month after being sacked in March.

    Employment Judge Baron accepted Azizur Rahman, owner of Haji Halal Meat in Upper Tooting Road, pressured his employee to convert to the Sunni Muslim faith.

    The tribunal heard: “Mr Rahman said he had been told that if he continued to employ the claimant then his customers would cease to patronise him.

    “Mr Rahman referred specifically to pressure being placed on him by the head of the Sunni sect who had helped Mr Rahman to gain admission for his daughters to single sex school for girls.”

    Mr Rahman claimed he had been influenced by a conference held by KN at the TIC on March 28, where worshippers were ordered to boycott Ahmadi-run shops.

    During that conference Mr Gani shared a stage with KN Abdul Rehman Bawa. Mr Bawa said: “I don’t know why our sisters or mothers are talking with these Qadiani and making friendships ... I know in this road, Tooting high street, all of the shops who are selling to Qadiani.

    “Don’t make friends with them... they are trying to deceive you, they are trying to convert you from Islam to Qadianism.”

    The owner of one Tooting halal butchers said his trade had fallen by nearly 50 per cent in three months. He said: “We have lost so much business because some people refuse to come here just because I am Ahmadi. They use words against me like ‘Kafir’, which means I am not Muslim.

    “I’ve lived here for 13 years and lots of people know me in Tooting, but this situation has become so much worse now.”

    A Wandsworth police spokesman said an investigation into the alleged hate crimes was ongoing.
     
  5. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Tooting election race infected by anti-Ahmadiyya hate campaign


    Hatred and threats towards the Ahmadiyya community even infected the general election race in Tooting.

    Since being re-elected in May with a slim majority of 2,524 after fierce opposition from Conservative candidate Mark Clarke, Sadiq Khan has gone on to become Shadow Justice Secretary.

    But Nasser Butt, who stood against him for the Liberal Democrats and is an Ahmadi, spoke out about a campaign to prevent him being elected because of his religion.

    An election hustings at the Tooting Islamic Centre (TIC) on April 14 turned into a dangerous farce after hardliners shut down proceedings.

    After arriving at the TIC, mixed-race Tory candidate Mark Clarke had to be locked into a room for his own safety after he was mistaken for Mr Butt by fundametalists.

    Mr Clarke’s election agent, Andre Walker, said: “We had to be locked in a room for our own security. The mosque committee were embarrassed by it and it was tense for a while...it was clear Nasser’s arrival would have been dangerous and a real problem. There was anger an Ahmadi was running.”

    During the incident, Mr Butt said he received a phone call from a committee member who told him it would be best if he did not come to speak as had been arranged.

    It has also emerged worshippers were given precise orders at the TIC to urge Muslims not to vote for Ahmadi candidates.

    A secret recording of a meeting at the TIC, two days before polling day on May 3, revealed Imam Suliman addressed the meeting alongside Harris Bokhani, speaker from an unknown organisation.

    Mr Bokhani is heard to tell the audience: “The majority of Muslims in this area are voting Lib Dem, because they think Nasser Butt is a Muslim.

    “If you don’t go in and speak to them, they’re not going to do it. They’re fed up of hearing it from the imams. They want to hear it from you. They need to you go into the community and say ‘Why are you supporting the Qadiani community?’”

    Mr Khan told this paper last week he was not aware of the incident until days later and did not know about the pair being locked in a room.

    He rejected claims the Muslim vote played an important role in his re-election, claiming he had support from faith leaders across the religious spectrum.

    He said: "It's really important everyone in the community gets along. One of the hallmarks of Tooting is that people with different rules and religions have got along so well for so long.

    "If there's any section of our community that feels vulnerable or discriminated against, there’s a responsibility on the rest of us to reach out and ensure this doesn’t happen.

    "There are theological differences but we shouldn’t just tolerate each other, we should respect each other.

    "My job as MP is to represent everyone in the community, irrespective of the size of the community and religious beliefs."

    TIC Imam Suliman Gani told us this week: “We never recommend any political candidate on religious grounds.

    “Like all organisations, we only recommend political candidates based on how their stated policies affect our community.

    “The Ahmadiyya community has been actively distributing leaflets claiming they are the only Muslims who love peace and harmony and thereby maligning the vast Muslim community.

    “So, as an example, unless an Ahmadi candidate renounced such maligning of Muslims by the community he belongs to, we would not recommend him as he/she would be antithetical to the perception of our peace-loving community in such delicate times.”
     
  6. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Relgious hate leaflets found in Tooting, Streatham and Kingston

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    Hate Leafllet: Khatme Nabuwwat warns muslims to beware
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    Boycott plea: Leaflet written in Somali found in Streatham mosque

    Inflammatory leaflets have been distributed across south London as part of a targeted ideological campaign against the Ahmadiyya community.

    Some of the literature is produced by anti-Ahmadi group KN, whose spokesmen delivered speeches at the TIC in Tooting, Streatham mosque and the Kingston mosque.

    One KN leaflet, Deception of the Qadiyani, was recently displayed in the window of the Sabina Hair and Cosmetic shop in Mitcham Road, Tooting.

    When we confronted staff to ask why they had put up these leaflets, a worker said: “These people are not Muslims. I did it myself.

    “They don’t believe that prophet Mohammed is the last prophet.”

    In August, Kingston police launched an investigation into suspected Ahmadi hate crime after leaflets were allegedly distributed in Kingston on July 6.

    Kingston police confirmed a teenage Ahmadi girl, who did not want to be named, gave them a statement claiming the leaflet, which was written in Urdu, said: “Kill a Qadiyani and doors to heaven will be open to you”.

    Police said they were appealing for information, but were not in possession of the leaflet, which was allegedly handed to the girl outside the Bentall Centre in Kingston town centre.
     
  7. Agantrope

    Agantrope Senior Member Senior Member

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    No Religion teaches hatredness. It is only few because of the few people's self interest made all the religion looks silly. Because of the few islamic fanatics, people are labelling all the people of that faith as terrorist. This is really a bad trend and will keep the whole world on the boil.
     
  8. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

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    So much for Zaid Hamid's 'Islamic Ummat" and "Islamic Unity"..LOL! Now what does that idiot have to say about this? Ahmediyyas are the most tormented community in Pakistan despite an ahmediyya proposing formation of Pakistan first.
     
  9. maomao

    maomao Veteran Hunter of Maleecha Senior Member

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    pakistan with its wretched Failed State ideology of mercenary work is spreading its testicles across globe, they are not just the worst human beings but born to terrorize the world and this Ahmediyya issue is no different, whoever do not go by what a mullah have to say is Kafir or a Munafiq in the eyes of the followers, and all this is happening under the nose of Politically Correct and Multicultural UK, and other soon to be jihadi sh1th0le nations are following the suite.
     
  10. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Hardliners call for deaths of Surrey Muslims

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    The Ahmadiyya Muslim community during Friday prayers at Baitul Futuh Mosque in Morden, London
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    Followers of the Ahmadiyya sect in Ciampea examine their burnt-out mosque in Indonesia's West Java province earlier this month. Many Muslims in Indonesia regard Ahmadiyyah as a heretical sect and have called for it to be suppressed

    Islamic extremists have started openly calling for the destruction of a controversial Muslim sect in a major escalation of sectarian conflict within British Islam, an investigation by The Independent has revealed.

    Members of the Ahmadiyya Community have seen a significant upsurge in threats and intimidation over the past four months, sparked by an extremist attack on two of their largest mosques in Pakistan earlier this year.

    Hardline Islamists in Britain have been distributing leaflets calling for the murder of AhmadiMuslims in Kingston-upon-Thames whilst mosques have been vandalised in Newham and Crawley. Preachers in south London have also been orchestrating a boycott of Ahmadi businesses and Ofcom has had to reprimand an Islamic satellite channel for repeatedly calling the sect "Wajib-ul Qatal" - an Arabic phrase used to describe those who digress from mainstream Islam that translates as "liable for death".

    Community leaders say the upsurge in animosity towards Ahmadis is directly linked to violence in Pakistan where local Taliban militants have declared war on sects that they deem to be heretical such as the Ahmadis and the Shi'a.

    Although the Ahmadis have been targeted by extremists in the past, the combined attacks on two mosques in Lahore in May was the most brazen assault on their community yet, with 93 worshippers killed as they gathered for Friday prayers, including a number of Britons.

    Since the mid 1980s the Ahmadi community has been headquartered in Morden, south London, after their leaders were forced to flee Pakistan, the only country in the world that legally forbids them from declaring themselves Muslims. They claim to have 70 million adherents worldwide although detractors say the number is closer to two million. An estimated 15,000 live in Britain including their spiritual leader Hadhrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad.

    The Ahmadi leadership had hoped the attacks in Lahore would prompt an outpouring of sympathy among British Muslims. Instead, they say, it has emboldened a minority of extremists to openly target them in an upsurge in intimidation.

    Rafiq Hayat, national president of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community UK, told The Independent: "Through leaflet distribution, posting of hate material on websites and via programmes on satellite TV (often in Urdu and other south Asian languages) our community is being made a target of hatred and hostility by preachers of hate. The perpetrators of this act are Muslims and whilst they are certainly not representative of the vast majority of Muslims in this country, they are creating hatred in society."

    Police in Kingston-upon-Thames have opened a hate crime investigation earlier this summer when an Ahmadi woman was handed a leaflet by a man which stated: "Kill [an Ahmadi] and the doors to heaven will be open for you." In Tooting, meanwhile, some mainstream Sunni preachers have urged follower to boycotts Ahmadi businesses.

    To many orthodox Muslims, the Ahmadis are considered heretical because they believe that their 19th century founder was none other than the Mahdi - Islam's equivalent of the messiah - and the successor to the Prophet Mohamed.

    Islamic satellite channels, a rapidly expanding but largely unregulated section of the broadcast media, have played an instrumental role in recent anti-Ahmadiyya campaigning. This week Ofcom criticised the Ummah Channel for a string of three programmes broadcast shortly before and after the Lahore massacre in which clerics and callers alike said Ahmadis should be killed.

    In one programme "Seal of the Prophethood" a cleric declared: Until now, whenever one has claimed to be a prophet the Muslim nation has issued fatwa that he should be killed. It is only that at present Muslims are weak and they do not have the power to slice such a man in two parts."

    On 21 May the Ummah Channel broadcast a in which Islamic scholars debated the status of Ahmadis within Islam.

    When a caller named Asim asked for a scholar to explain whether Ahmadis were legitimate Muslims the imam replied: "Since the time of the Holy Prophet (peace be upon him) the Sahiba [knowledgeable scholars] have confirmed that anyone who believes in a prophet after the Holy Prophet is a kafir [unbeliever], murtad [apostate] and Wajib-ul Qatal [liable for death]."

    He later added: "Until now, whoever has claimed prophethood, the Muslim Ummah has issued the fatwa for them to be killed. And all these false prophets have always been killed. It is only now that Muslims have become weak and they do not have the strength that they should cut such people into two."

    Ahmadis were also frequently referred to as "filth" who should be avoided by mainstream Muslims.

    Ofcom ruled that the Ummah Channel breached broadcasting regulations with its "abusive treatment of the religious views and beliefs of members of the Ahmadiyya community".

    A representative of Ummah Channel said the station has now broadcast apologies for the programmes. "The Ummah Channel would like to express their sincere apologies for any offence caused," the spokesperson said. "It was never the intention of the Ummah Channel to support or condone these opinions that were delivered by independent scholars during 'live' phone in shows."

    The Ahmadis say that doctrinal opposition towards their community is being spearheaded by Khatme Nubawwat Academy, a British offshoot of a Pakistani group that is dedicated to confronting Ahmadi beliefs.

    The group, whose name translates to "The Finality of the Prophet", has close connections to the Pakistani establishment and met Pakistan's high commissioner in the UK earlier this summer.

    They also held a conference in Newham on 18th June in which one of their speakers claimed that the attacks on the two mosques on Lahore were an Ahmadi conspiracy.

    Imam Suhail Bawa, a leading Khatme Nubbawat preacher, told worshippers: "This will become apparent very soon to you all that Qadiani [a derogatory term for Ahmadis] themselves are behind this whole conspiracy. [They] are responsible for whatever has happened in Lahore. This is all Qadiani conspiracy. They now come to television programs to try to "falsely" demonstrate their victimisation."

    He then went on to warn that any attempt to try and change laws in Pakistan which forbid Ahmadis from calling themselves Muslims would be met with violence on a similar scale to a previous massacre of Ahmadis in 1953 in Lahore.

    "If the anti-Qadiani laws or the blasphemy laws are touched by anyone in Pakistan," Imam Bawa said, "then the 1953 Lahore agitation against the Qadianis will be repeated in the streets once more. The streets and roads of Lahore were filled with blood in that agitation."

    Khatme Nubbawat preachers have also given anti-Ahmadi speeches in Tooting Islamic Centre.

    On the website for the group's east London offices in Forest Gate, Ahmadis are described as "nothing but a gang of traitors, apostates and infidels". The term Wajib-ul Qatal is not used although their preachers in Pakistan often use the term.

    Akber Choudhry, a spokesperson for the Khatme Nubawwat Academy, said: "[We are] an independent UK organisation that is loosely affiliated with other such organisations around the world, and one of their major goals is to counter Qadiani (Ahmadiyya) propaganda within the laws of the jurisdiction in which each such organisation is based. We condemn all atrocities being committed in Pakistan and it is our wish and desire that Pakistan be free from all war, foreign intervention and attacks on civilians."

    Asked whether he thought it was acceptable to describe a religious group as a "gang of traitors, apostates and infidels" Mr Choudhry replied: "The words 'apostates' and 'infidels' are understood differently in English than in their Islamic theological sense, especially within the Urdu-speaking Muslims, and can be replaced by terms more sensitive to the current climate in which the connotations of these words have changed quite rapidly in the past few years."

    But Mr Hayat said he believed groups like Khatme Nubawwat create an atmosphere that encourages ordinary Muslims to be hostile towards Ahmadis.

    "Freedom of speech is one thing, but incitement of hatred is another matter altogether," he said. "We appeal to the authorities to nip this in the bud; otherwise this campaign of hatred against Ahmadi Muslims today will tomorrow grow into a threat against other moderate Muslims and indeed the wider society."
     
  11. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    So pakistani immigrant in UK are spreading their pakistaniyat in UK through hate campaign against Ahmadiyas.
     
  12. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    You give an inch to Islamists they will take a kilometer from you. I think UK deserves this position given its terrorist pandering policies of past few decades. You reap what you sow.
     

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