HAL not keenon bidding forIAF’s newtrainer

Discussion in 'Indian Air Force' started by Rajendra91, Mar 31, 2014.

  1. Rajendra91

    Rajendra91 Regular Member

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    SOURCE: IDRW
    [​IMG]
    The IAF’s long
    struggle to
    acquire new
    aircraft for
    rookie pilots has
    got a fresh twist,
    with Hindustan
    Aeronautics
    Limited showing
    no interest in a
    proposal for
    licensed
    production of the
    Swiss basic
    trainer Pilatus
    PC Mk II, even as
    a simultaneous
    hunt has been
    launched for new
    intermediate
    jets.
    HAL is making
    both basic and
    advanced
    trainers for the
    IAF. But an
    inordinate delay
    in developing the
    aircraft has
    forced the IAF to
    look at other
    options.
    The IAF’s flying
    training
    programme is
    structured in
    three stages,
    starting from the
    basic and moving
    to intermediate
    and advanced.
    The IAF uses
    different
    aircraft for
    every stage. It
    recently acquired
    Swiss Pilatus PC
    Mk II for basic
    training but it
    continues to use
    the outdated
    Kirans for
    intermediate
    stage, while the
    advanced
    programme is
    centered round
    the British Hawk
    jets.
    For the basic
    stage, the IAF
    has a
    requirement of
    181 aircraft. It
    has ordered 75
    Pilatus PC Mk II
    and has the
    option of buying
    38 more Swiss
    aircraft while
    the rest can be
    procured from
    HAL, which is
    developing the
    HTT-40.
    With the HTT-40
    programme not
    making much
    headway, the IAF
    proposed that it
    should get more
    of the Swiss
    aircraft. It
    invited bids from
    Indian
    companies,
    including HAL, to
    produce Pilatus.
    But sources from
    HAL have ruled
    out making the
    Pilatus when its
    own programme
    was underway.
    Sources said HAL
    has already spent
    around Rs 100
    crore and will go
    ahead with its
    project.
    The aircraft,
    however, is
    nowhere near its
    first flight as
    neither the
    engine nor the
    propeller has
    been finalised.
    Running out of
    time, the IAF has
    proposed that
    Pilatus should be
    built at home.
    But an internal
    assessment
    about the
    proposal has not
    found many
    takers in the
    industry in India.
    The story of the
    intermediate jet
    trainer is equally
    worrisome. HAL
    claimed it has
    made some
    headway in
    correcting design
    defects in its
    Intermediate Jet
    Trainer (IJT)
    Sitara. But IAF is
    not hopeful the
    aircraft will be
    available even
    by the end of
    2015.
    It has begun the
    process of
    hunting for a
    new IJT that will
    replace the
    Kirans, which
    were to be
    phased out in
    2013.
     
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