Genetic make up of Indian Muslims

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by SHURIDH, Nov 26, 2012.

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  1. SHURIDH

    SHURIDH Senior Member Senior Member

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    Traces of sub-Saharan and Middle Eastern lineages in Indian Muslim populations

    Eaaswarkhanth M , Haque I , Ravesh Z , Romero IG , MeganathanPR , Dubey B , Khan FA , Chaubey G , Kivisild T , Tyler-Smith C , Singh L , Thangaraj K .
    National DNA Analysis Centre, Central Forensic Science Laboratory, Kolkata, India.
    Abstract
    Islam is the second most practiced religion in India, next toHinduism. It is still unclear whether the spread of Islam in India has been only a cultural transformation or is associated with detectable levels of gene flow. To estimate the contributionof West Asian and Arabian admixture to Indian Muslims, we assessed genetic variation in mtDNA, Y-chromosomal and LCT/MCM6 markers in 472, 431 and 476 samples, respectively, representing six Muslim communities from different geographical regions of India. Wefound that most of the Indian Muslim populations received their major genetic input from geographically close non-Muslim populations. However, low levels of likely sub-Saharan African, Arabian and West Asian admixture were also observed among Indian Muslims in the form of L0a2a2 mtDNA and E1b1b1a and J(*)(xJ2) Y-chromosomal lineages. The distinction between Iranian and Arabian sources was difficult to make with mtDNA and the Y chromosome, as the estimates were highly correlated because ofsimilar gene pool compositions inthe sources. In contrast, the LCT/MCM6 locus, which shows a clear distinction between the two sources, enabled us to rule out significant gene flow from Arabia.Overall, our results support a model according to which the spread of Islam in India was predominantly cultural conversionassociated with minor but still detectable levels of gene flow from outside, primarily from Iran and Central Asia, rather than directly from the Arabian Peninsula.

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    Traces of sub-Saharan and Middle Eastern lin... [Eur J Hum Genet. 2010] - PubMed - NCBI
    I don't know if it posted earliar.
     
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  3. SHURIDH

    SHURIDH Senior Member Senior Member

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    Diverse genetic origin of Indian Muslims: evidence from autosomal STR loci.
    Eaaswarkhanth M, Dubey B, Meganathan PR, Ravesh Z, Khan FA, Singh L, Thangaraj K, Haque I.
    J Hum Genet. 2009 Jun;54(6):340-8. Epub 2009 May 8.
    National DNA Analysis Centre, Central Forensic Science Laboratory, Kolkata, India.
    Abstract
    The origin and relationships of Indian Muslims is still dubious andare not yet genetically well studied. In the light of historically attested movements into Indian subcontinent during the demic expansion of Islam, the present study aims to substantiate whether it had been accompaniedby any gene flow or only a culturaltransformation phenomenon. An array of 13 autosomal STR markers that are common in the worldwide data sets was used to explore the genetic diversity of Indian Muslims. The austere endogamy being practiced for several generations was confirmed by the genetic demarcation of each of the six Indian Muslim communities in the phylogenetic assessments for the markers examined. The analyses were further refined by comparison with geographically closest neighboring Hindu religious groups (including several caste and tribal populations) and the populations from Middle East, East Asia and Europe. We found that some of the Muslim populations displayed high level of regional genetic affinity rather than religious affinity. Interestingly, in Dawoodi Bohras (TN and GUJ) and Iranian Shia significant genetic contribution from West Asia, especially Iran (49, 47 and 46%, respectively) was observed. This divulges the existence of Middle Eastern genetic signatures in some of the contemporary Indian Muslim populations. Our study reveals that the spread of Islamic faith in the Indian subcontinent was predominantly cultural transformation associated with minor gene flow from West Asia.

    Diverse genetic origin of Indian Muslim - PubMed Mobile
     
  4. spikey360

    spikey360 Crusader Senior Member

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    :laugh:
    When I joined this forum almost 2 years ago, major topic for discussion was aircrafts and missiles.
    Now, it is about Hindus and Muslims. I congratulate everyone for this "secular" transformation.
     
  5. SHURIDH

    SHURIDH Senior Member Senior Member

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    A shared Y-chromosomal heritage between Muslims andHindus in India.
    Gutala R, et al. Show all
    Hum Genet. 2006 Nov;120(4):543-51. Epub 2006 Sep 2.
    Department of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, USA.
    Abstract
    Arab forces conquered the Indus Delta region in 711 AD: and, although a Muslim state was established there, their influence was barely felt in the rest of South Asia at that time. Bythe end of the tenth century, Central Asian Muslims moved into India from the northwest and expanded throughout the subcontinent. Muslim communities are now the largest minority religion in India,comprising more than 138 million people in a predominantly Hindu populationof over one billion. It is unclear whether the Muslim expansion in India was a purely cultural phenomenon or had a genetic impact on the local population. To address this question from a male perspective, we typed eightmicrosatellite loci and 16 binary markers from the Y chromosome in 246 Muslims from Andhra Pradesh, and compared them to published data on 4,204 males from East Asia, Central Asia, other parts of India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Iran, the Middle East, Turkey, Egypt and Morocco. We find that the Muslim populations in general are genetically closer to their non-Muslim geographical neighbors than to other Muslimsin India, and that there is a highly significant correlation between genetics and geography (but not religion). Our findings indicate that, despite the documented practiceof marriage between Muslim men and Hindu women, Islamization in India did not involve large-scale replacement of Hindu Y chromosomes. The Muslim expansion in India was predominantly a cultural change and was not accompanied by significant gene flow, as seen in other places, such as China and Central Asia.
    A shared Y-chromosomal heritage between - PubMed Mobile
     
  6. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    I guess that's what you call a member driven forum. 3 years ago religious discussion was banned and we didn't have any section for it. But there was repeated and repeated call for allowing it for " academic" interest.

    All academics pretty much got thrown out and it has become a crappy slugfest.
     
    Snuggy321 and Singh like this.
  7. SHURIDH

    SHURIDH Senior Member Senior Member

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    See it is religion & culture section.
    So genetics of indian muslim population is an important academic disscusion topic .
    The articles are from government site and its mostly academic.
     
  8. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Anyways, this has been posted earlier.
     
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