Gen VK SIngh's Book Courage & Conviction

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by Ray, Nov 9, 2013.

  1. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Gen VK Singh attacks PM's 'indecisiveness'

    Highlighting prime minister Manmohan Singh’s lack of courage and ability to take quick decisions, former army chief General VK Singh in his autobiography, Courage and Convictions, has said the PM was unable to implement his promised aid programmes in the neighbouring countries and even could not handle his own officers, who had overstretched the Tatra truck scandal issue.

    Blaming the PM directly for lacking conviction, while announcing such aid programmes, General Singh mentioned a stalled road project worth Rs 20cr promised to Mayanmar. During Army Day reception in 2012, Singh asked the general about his just concluded visit to Myanmar. “And when I raised the issue of financial aid package of about Rs20 crore, I had come to know from my counterpart in Myanmar, the prime minister replied, ‘General saab, ab yeh procedural problems hain,” said the general, who expected Singh to take on bureaucracy and enforce his aid programme in order to mend relations with the neighbouring country. The general claimed that Singh used to express his helplessness in matters that should have been trivial.

    “Had the task (Maynmar road project) been given to the army, we would have handed over the road rollers in less than a week. No wonder then that none of our neighbours trust us,” he wrote, wondering why to make such offers at first place, when the government cannot live with them.
    General Singh wrote, he had lost the count of prime minister promising him that he was trying to sort out one issue or the other.

    He has also dragged Sigh’s office blaming it for the controversy over his age as well as the Tatra truck scandal. Blaming a senior bureaucrat in the PMO for “orchestrating” the issues, he said name of this officer was “cropping up regularly” and his relatives had been given plots in the BEML complex – the PSU that assembles Tatra trucks in India. Gen Singh also referred a retired army general as a ‘middleman’, who had offered him a bribe of Rs14 crore.

    In the book, General Singh mentioned his confrontation with the then union home minister P Chidambaram who, according to him, had made up mind to deploy army in the naxal-hit areas. “I told him, it is a socio-economic and governance issue and needs to be addressed accordingly.”
    Singh wrote, arguing, the naxal problem was different from the challenges in Jammu and Kashmir and the North-East, where army was engaged in containing insurgency.

    Gen VK Singh attacks PM's 'indecisiveness' - India - DNA
     
    Ankit Purohit likes this.
  2.  
  3. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    re: Gen VK SIngh's Book Courage & Conviction

    Jawaharlal Nehru had paranoia of military coup: Gen VK Singh

    NEW DELHI: India's first prime minister Jawaharlal Nehru was paranoid about a military coup, and the country's leadership failed to keep the army prepared in the eventuality of the Chinese attack in 1962, former army chief Gen VK Singh has said.

    VK Singh's last few months in office saw him in a legal tussle with the government concerning his age.

    In his autobiography "Courage and Conviction", which was released Friday, VK Singh said Nehru's daughter Indira Gandhi not only inherited the leadership of the country from her father but also never stopped looking over her shoulder.

    "Since independence, the top political leadership in the country has been haunted by the possibility of a military takeover. It is no secret that people around Nehru exploited his paranoia of a military coup and started chipping away at the army in an evolving civil-military relationship," Singh wrote in his book.

    Singh has written the book with writer-filmmaker Kunal Verma.

    He said the appointment of Sardar Baldev Singh as India's "first defence minister - a man known for his political 'fix it' ability rather than military acumen - set the tone for the future".

    Singh also said that if Nehru had his way, Field Marshal KM Cariappa would never have been the army chief.

    "(Gen K.S.) Thimayya's popularity as an individual would give prime minister Nehru more nightmares than the Chinese on the border. When the attack did come in October 1962, the Indian Army was engaged in 'Op Amar' where they were building houses while our ordnance factories were making coffee percolators," the book said.

    "Thorat, Prem Bhagat, SK Sinha - they were all dumped by the wayside. Indira Gandhi not only inherited the leadership of the country from her father, she too never stopped looking over her shoulder.

    "The examples are endless, the lesson the same. If you want to spook the system, raise the spectre of a military takeover. It always works," the book says.

    The book has been published by Aleph book company.

    Jawaharlal Nehru had paranoia of military coup: Gen VK Singh - The Economic Times
     
    Ankit Purohit likes this.
  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    re: Gen VK SIngh's Book Courage & Conviction

    Indira Gandhi to generals: VK Singh targets all in book

    The first army chief to take the government to court when they changed his age, General VK Singh now speaks out in his autobiography ‘Courage and Conviction’ on the age row, corruption in high places and a ring side view on the conflicts he participated in since the ’71 war. Excerpts:

    [​IMG]


    Operation Bluestar

    By the end of May 1984, the situation in Punjab was becoming extremely tense. In May 1984, Indira Gandhi called for a conference at her residence. It was attended by the Chief of army staff (COAS), General Arun Shridhar Vaidya, the DGMO, General CM Somanna, and the Western Army Commander who had come down from Chandimandir, Lieutenant General Krishnaswamy Sundarji.

    Indira Gandhi had discussed the situation within the Golden Temple, and asked the Western Army Commander if the entire group of militants could be flushed out. General Sundarji had responded positively, reportedly saying that if there was a requirement to clear the Golden Temple, he would have it cleared in no time.

    Sundarji’s belligerent stance put the COAS in an awkward situation. As the chief, with General Somanna by his side, began to explain the reasoning behind this advice, Indira Gandhi impatiently cut him short and asked him why he was anticipating problems when the army commander on the ground was confident of resolving the issue.

    General Sundarji always looked to be a man in a tremendous hurry, and it was felt that he was too willing to do things without getting into the details of the matter.

    This set the ball rolling for what was to be one of India’s darkest chapters —Operation Blue Star. Indira Gandhi also unwittingly created a situation where Army headquarters now had to play a secondary role to Western Command in planning the operation.

    The moment General Sundarji pulled the carpet from under the COAS’s feet, military logic had been compromised and each subsequent decision was guided by political rather than operational logic.

    [​IMG]
    A file photo of Army brass including the then Army chief General Arun Sridhar Vaidya (extreme right) after Operation Blue Star at the Golden Temple in Amritsar

    Operation Brasstacks

    Towards the end of 1986, India had begun its preparations for Exercise Brasstacks. The war game was one of the largest ever to have been planned, involving thousands of troops and armour...

    Lieutenant General RN Mahajan from the Kumaon Regiment had taken over from Somanna. General K Sundarji was elevated to the top job.

    Mahajan finished briefing the chief, stating categorically that there was nothing discernible which suggested any problems. Sundarji, however, was not convinced. ‘Look at their (Pakistan’s) 10 Corps again,’ he insisted, ‘why is it moving troops to the north?’

    This Pakistani formation was based around Murree and movement to the north would particularly impact the border in Jammu and Kashmir.

    We re-examined every piece of information from every possible angle. …there was nothing that suggested even the slightest deviation to the Pakistani position that could be viewed suspiciously.

    It almost seemed as if he was now second-guessing himself and in the process losing his nerve. He then issued an order that stunned the DGMO and everybody else in the room, ‘Move one of Army HQ’s reserves opposite the 10 Corps area.’

    ..(a) call came from Pakistan’s DGMO on the hotline to his Indian counterpart. The Pakistani general said that there were other (troop) movements that did not fit into the overall profile.

    With war hysteria building up all around, hundreds of thousands of people evacuated the area. War seemed imminent, with both the Indian and Pakistani Prime Ministers issuing threats to each other.

    War in Sri Lanka

    …the LTTE, President Jayewardene, working with the Indian diplomat corps in Colombo, succeeded in selling to Rajiv Gandhi an agreement that could never have worked. The third person in this chain was General Sundarji, the army chief, who, in my opinion, had demonstrated time and again that the more complex and dangerous the situation on the ground, the greater the chance of the army charging in with bluster and bravado.

    Within the first month, we had demonstrated to ourselves and also to the LTTE that we had no clear-cut objectives, and were just rushing from one location to the other.

    [​IMG]
    A file photo of the mechanised infantry section of the Indian Peace Keeping Force in action against the LTTE in Sri Lanka. (HT photo)

    Gen JJ Singh’s fixed the line of succession

    With the benefit of hindsight, some facts are clear.

    General JJ Singh had taken over as the COAS in 2004 and his own tenure was to run till the end of September 2007. It is now an established fact that he had, within months of taking charge, initiated the ‘look down policy’ that would give a clear idea as to what the line of succession would, or could be.

    At this stage, it was probably brought to JJ’s notice that if the COAS could truncate my tenure as the chief to a two-year period, then the path could be cleared for the officer of his choice, and perhaps the choice of other in the government, to take over in 2012.

    While all the others had to be ‘fixed’ in their brigadier to major general boards, or by other delaying tactics that allowed the designated favourite to overtake them, in the overall scheme of things it was probably an imperative that I become the chief, but only for a limited period.

    PMO official and the Tatra scam

    But the bigger shock was yet to come. Having first looked at BEML and the Tatra truck while looking at procurements as part of the Transformation Study, I asked for more information, especially as an order for approximately 700 additional vehicles were awaiting Army HQ’s nod.

    This just wasn’t making any sense. We were continuing to pay BEML almost four times what the vehicles were costing them. What was even more amazing was the fact that the chairman and managing director of BEML had been at the helm for 12 years, and his networking skills had plugged him into a lot of ‘helpful’ friends.

    There were murmurings that the relatives of a senior bureaucrat at the PMO had been given plots in the BEML housing society and the son of a top official at the Planning commission had been living in the BEML guest rooms for more than a year.

    ‘Don’t ask too many questions, sir,’ I was advised by those in the know of the procurement business. ‘The trail goes right up to a very high official in the PMO.’

    "'Don't ask too many questions sir,' I was advised by those in the know of the procurement business. 'The trail goes right up to a very high official in the PMO (prime minister's office)'."


    These words of General Vijay Kumar Singh on the Tatra truck scandal and many other controversies that dogged his tenure as the 26th army chief of India will find a mention in a tell-all autobiography -- Courage and Conviction -- that hits the stands on Friday.

    Tatra trucks, in service of the army for nearly 20 years, were being imported by government-run Bharat Earth Movers Limited. There were whispers that the vehicles were being imported though the government had mandated that they be manufactured locally.

    Once Gen Singh took up the matter, the CBI launched an investigation. Singh claims he was advised against raising the issue because the link went straight up to a senior official in the PMO but hasn't identified the official.

    The 363-page book, co-authored with writer and film-maker Kunal Verma and published by Aleph Books, blames ex-army chief and former Arunachal Pradesh governor Gen JJ Singh of "fixing" the army's line of succession.

    The former chief, who was involved in a much publicised age row with the government, claims JJ Singh manipulated promotion boards to ensure that the Bikram Singh, the serving army chief, could take over from him.

    Singh took over as the army chief on March 31, 2010 from Gen Deepak Kapoor.

    Singh, who took the government to the Supreme Court over the age row, says throughout his career, his year of birth had been accepted as 1951. The sudden change was made after several other officers who could have been in the race to be the army chief, were "removed".

    While Singh had to withdraw the case, he has always blamed government officials and one of his predecessors for the change in age. Had 1951 been accepted as his year of birth, Singh would have continued to be the army chief for another year-- till May 2013.

    The court recently started contempt proceedings against him for comments he made about the case.

    Singh also claims that his effort to weed out corruption led to a powerful clique conspiring against him.

    Singh, who early in his carrier served in the sensitive Military Operations directorate and had a ring-side view of Operation Bluestar, when the army entered the holiest Sikh shrine the Golden Temple in 1984. He blames the then Western army commander Lt Gen K Sundarji for undermining senior army officers and misleading Prime Minister Indira Gandhi.

    He says political considerations overtook military logic leading to the botched operation that would eventually cost Gandhi her life and triggered a spiral of violence in Punjab that continued till early 1990s. Gen Sundarji, he says, would make another strategic blunder a few years later, almost bringing India and Pakistan to the brink of war.

    The book also blames the ministry of defence for the slow pace of military modernisation and talks about how a critical post was kept vacant during his tenure to prevent modernisation.

    Indira Gandhi to generals: VK Singh targets all in book - Hindustan Times
     
    Ankit Purohit likes this.
  5. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Hope that this book does not rake up muck from any side!
     
  6. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Messages:
    24,272
    Likes Received:
    11,275
    Location:
    BANGalore
    You think?
     
  7. pankaj nema

    pankaj nema Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2009
    Messages:
    3,450
    Likes Received:
    1,407
    Sir this book is precisely intended to do just that ie raise muck

    But Gen V K Singh has made a few cardinal mistakes ; if I may say so

    He has criticised two people who are not only Great But have made such a contribution to India
    for which they will always be remembered with awe and gratitude

    1 Criticised Madam Indira Gandhi for Bluestar

    Indira Gandhi not only created History but also changed Geography ie 1971

    SO her other mistakes ie Bluestar and Emergency are pardonable

    2 Gen Sundarji is the General who has MADE Indian Army the FORCE it is Today
    Gen V K Singh cannot even hold a Candle to General Sundarji

    General Sundarji was the first General who Understood the Importance and POWER
    of Armour and Mechanised Forces

    Before General Sundarji Indian Army was predominantly an Infantry Force
    where the soldiers were expected to just lay down their lives for the country

    The Operation Brasstacks and Exercise Chequerboard in Sumdorung Chu
    ie A Two Front Situation was for the first time India had Handled and Faced
    WITHOUT loosing either Territory or Face

    History will always remember General Sundarji as the General who truly TRANSFORMED
    Indian Army's Force Structure and Fighting doctrines

    or in simple words General Sundarji made the Indian Army so strong that the PAKIS simply
    Get " Brown salwars " when Indian Army Strike Corps are Positioned at their door
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2013
  8. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Rightly or wrongly, Gen VK Singh has too many controversies going.

    Whenever anyone accuses someone, that someone defends himself.

    That leads to more controversies and dirtying the water.
     
    Yusuf likes this.
  9. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    I would not deify anyone.

    Everyone takes decisions under grave and stressful conditions.

    They cannot be right all the time.

    Then there are many sides to the same issue.

    Strike Deep is a very proactive policy, but given the nuclear tangle, it may not be feasible unless the nuclear arm of Pakistan is de-fanged.

    Therefore, the next best solution was evolved - what is popularly known as Cold Start.

    Yes, Gen Sunderjee was a dynamic man.

    Gen Suderjee did bring in mechanisation.

    But it was based on the Threat Perception and was for complementary strategic manoeuvres, and depending on its outcome, be more proactive for the jugular.

    However, where is India's issue with Pakistan?

    The deserts or the plains of Pakistani Punjab?

    Even if we won a whole lot of territory, we would still have to give it back.

    The nub of the issue is Kashmir. We do not have to give back anything we capture as per the Simla Agreement.

    Therefore, Infantry continues to be the decision making arm, even if it does not give the armchair observer the thrill of an action filled film thriller!

    Has Gen VK Singh commented adversely o Chequerboard?

    And by the way, it was an Infantry action.


    Likewise, Indira Gandhi.

    Great woman. Iron Lady.

    But he was very political chameleon.

    That is why she could twiddle all around her little finger.

    But then would she be right always?

    Food for thought!
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2013
  10. pankaj nema

    pankaj nema Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2009
    Messages:
    3,450
    Likes Received:
    1,407
    @ Ray Sir

    Sir Criticising Gen JJ Singh; PM Manmohan SIngh ; Gen Deepak kapoor ;
    and writing about Scams and corruption is One thing
    But when VK Singh has Included the names of Indira Gandhi and General
    Sundarji ; his motives become obvious

    He only wants the sale of his stupid book

    Though I did support him in his Date of Birth controversy because
    Gen JJ Singh and Deepak Kapoor and PM Man Mohan Singh all were involved
    directly and the PM simply closed his eyes but this book is another matter
    where in he has dragged in Indira Gandhi and Gen Sundarji

    Similarly IPKF disaster was Not the fault of Gen Sundarji
    It was Rajiv Gandhi's idea and Sundarji had to go along with it

    Bluestar was also NOT Indira Gandhi's Fault

    She did not ask Akalis to store Arms in Golden Temple and declare a war on India

    Even TODAY we see New Political forces are Propped up to split votes in Three / Four parts
    like MNS in Maharashtra and TRS in Andhra and IUML in Kerala

    So Indira Gandhi was Also doing the same thing ie a counter force against Akalis
    But Bhindrawale was another kettle of fish and what happened was inevitable
     
  11. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    One requires to study issues from a variety of sources before coming to any conclusion, which even so, may not be 100% right.

    An analyst does not go by the popular stories, but looks deeper, but even so the real truth is hard to unravel.

    I really would not know Gen VK Singh's motive behind the book or its content.
     
  12. pankaj nema

    pankaj nema Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2009
    Messages:
    3,450
    Likes Received:
    1,407
    @ Ray Sir

    Cold start is a much needed modification of the Sundarji Doctrine
    based on the Paki sensitivities

    But the Force composition and structure remains the same

    Instead of three Big strike Corps you have 8 or More IBGs
    with heavy artilerry and air power also thrown in

    What Sundarji did prove to the Pakis through Brasstacks
    and again in April 1990 though the COAS was different at that time
    that Indian Army will destroy them completely in a high intensity battle of attrition

    The Threat of India's Massive Armoured thrust into Pakistan has kept the
    Paki Activities in Kashmir below India's retaliatory threshold

    Otherwise what prevents Pakistan from sending Lakhs of Jihadis at once
    across the LOC

    Ie A Much bigger Operation Gibraltar

    Because of the Fear that then the Indian Army will come inside mainland Pakistan
    and it will all be over for them
     
  13. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Read more about Brasstacks &its effects.

    It was dynamic & bold, but then everything good has its cost.
     
  14. Eesh

    Eesh Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2013
    Messages:
    393
    Likes Received:
    162
    Location:
    New Delhi
    II am sure that in 1984 Western Army Command was located at Shimla, not Chandimandir.
     
  15. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Should have deterred them from doing Kargil.

    But it did not.

    Just a point for consideration.
     
  16. Decklander

    Decklander New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2012
    Messages:
    2,654
    Likes Received:
    4,043
    Location:
    New Delhi
    In 1987 Jan/Feb, I was a Midshipman on INS Sindhudurg, We had gone out on an excercise and suddenly on 22nd Feb, we got a message at sea to return to harbour with maximum dispatch. when we reached back the harbour we were told to load full war shots compliment of missiles and guns. Everything was thrown out from the ship including our baggage and we were sleeping on canisters of 57mm ammo. We were asked to sail out asap and a sealed letter was delivered to CO with instructions to be opened on instructions. INS Sindhudurg was a small ship so we had a cipher decipher team which comprised even the midshipman who was CO's Doggy called his Staffo, which happened to be me. We sailed and after three days we got the message on OTP (One time pad). This is called the highest security protocol and is top secret. The codes once used on OTP are never ever repeated. The best part of this OTP is that even if you have the codes and code breaking book with you, you still can't break the code. We were asked to move to a position 60nm from Karachi which wud give us an attack profile on 060-240 axis. The ship went to two watch system and As we closed in on Karachi, we went to NBCD state-1 condidion Zulu with all below waterline openings shut tight with armed men posted to ensure that incase of flooding due to war damage, no one can open it from inside. I was the G-3 of the ship and 57mm mounting is what I controlled. The P-15s were with G-1, SAMs were with G-2.
    We entered pak EEZ and we had PN ships next to us. They were waiting for us. The US fleet operating off Persian gulf was passing our movements to PN. Everyday in the morning we used to have the fly past by F-14s over us. It was during that time that my CO who himself was an aviator got impressed by me and without my knowledge and consent recommended me for Aviation.
    Then suddenly we got another message from Bombay naval broadcast on HF in top secret format. We went to full war alert and for next six days we remained alert on stations with sleep time being rotated. In that SAM control station of our ship we were just four of us, G-2, myself and two sailors. We ran out of water so sea water was used in the toilets. We went crazy scartching our balls and a$$es due to the salt water. The whole body was smelling bad for want of bath as Sindhudurg did not have water cleansing system and had to carry very limited supply of fresh water which was being saved for drinking and cooking.
    Suddenly in end March, we were asked to stand down and return to harbour. When we came back and joined the hot debrief, we realised that our ship was the sacrificial goat and we were supposed to have started the war by striking Karachi harbour which wud have ensured us being sunk for sure by PN. The Operation was supposed to be Called Trident-3.
    Brasstacks was the biggest folly of our war planners if I may say so in Hindsight. People appear more informed and correct in hindsight.
    We backed down from war due to false propaganda initiated by US & Pak about their nukes and I do not agree to what has been posted by Gen VK Singh. Pak was ready for war against our excercise and we lost a great chance to finish them off. The same game was repeated in June 1990 when I was on INS Gomati and VP singh was the PM. We again buckled under the threat of nuke war with Pak under US pressure. I do not know what was the rank of Gen VK Singh in 1987 & 1990. But I was on the frontline ships of IN at that time. He seems miles off the target.
    His remarks about Blue star are also wrong. What option did we have at that time and which armed force was best equipped to deal with that situation especially when IA has stubbournly refused to let any police force be equipped with similar weapons as it has for internal defence on the lines of US national guards. This guy seems to have lost it. I have defended him on this forum but IMHO, he got what he deserved. What a bloody fool.
     
  17. parijataka

    parijataka Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2011
    Messages:
    4,893
    Likes Received:
    3,688
    Location:
    Bengaluru
    AFAIK it was Indira Gandhi who fuelled the Punjab disturbances by encouraging Bhindranwale to topple the Akalis in Punjab.

    My late father used to call Indira Gandhi `Evil Woman` for all the selfish deeds she did.

    Bangladesh war was one of the few things she got right IMO !
     
  18. roma

    roma NRI in Europe Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2009
    Messages:
    3,247
    Likes Received:
    1,861
    just speaking my mind here
    the more i hear about our 1st pm , honestly the less i want to hear about him
    can one person really be so cursed as to get almost every decision wrong ?

    or are we over-blaming him (for everything ?)
    trouble is , most rational people seem to think it was him ( who got it wrong ) !!
     
  19. Simple_Guy

    Simple_Guy Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2013
    Messages:
    938
    Likes Received:
    533
    Location:
    Delhi
    Bangladesh situation fell into the lap of Indira Gandhi. Credit to her goes for aiding Mukti Bahini.

    But credit fro the stunning victory goes to army and the Generals like Manekshaw, Arora, and Sagat SIngh.

    Indira Gandhi then lost all credit by foolishly signing Simla Agreement and returned 90,000 POWs without taking back POK. A decision that cost India dearly to this day!
     
  20. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    While Indira Gandhi may have had faults in her approach to her political adversaries and other faults, yet one cannot but credit her for her political handling internationally and political will that gave the Indian Armed Forces the right impetus to launch, conduct and bring the war to a successful conclusion.

    It is Indira Gandhi who toured extensively to create the correct international political environment that ensured no adverse effect, except for Tricky Dick and his sidekick Kissinthemanger.

    It is Indira Gandhi who ensured that the deficiencies in the Armed Forces were made up.

    It is Indira Gandhi who ensured that Russia balanced the ire and chagrin of the US and neutralised China, wherein, I believe the Russians worried China with a bit of posturing toward Sinkiang.
     
    parijataka and Yusuf like this.
  21. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    The fun and games on the book's content has started.

    I believe JJ SIngh has given his rejoinder.
     

Share This Page