Ganges Water & Farakka Dam

Discussion in 'Subcontinent & Central Asia' started by rockey 71, Apr 7, 2016.

  1. rockey 71

    rockey 71 Regular Member

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    Ganges flow in country lowest since ’96 treaty

    April 6, 2016 12:46 am·

    Mustafizur Rahman



    The Ganges, flowing through Bangladesh, was at its lowest ever during March 2016, since the signing of the water sharing treaty with India in 1996, adversely affecting agriculture and biodiversity in one-thirds of the whole country.



    Bangladesh’s share of water in the cross-border river at Farakka point in India was recorded at a quantum of only 15,606 cusec in the last 10 days of March, down from the historical average flows of 29,688 cusec during the time, according to the Joint Rivers Commission, Bangladesh.



    ‘Bangladesh received the lowest ever flows at the Ganges in March since the 1996 treaty on the sharing of Ganges waters,’ a senior official at the JRC in Dhaka told New Age on Tuesday.



    The total water flow at the Farakka point fell to 50,606 cusec in March from 72,335 cusec in January, the JRC data released on April 3 showed.



    ‘The Ganges scenario this time is very bad. The average water flows on both sides have fallen,’ JRC, Bangladesh member Md Zahid Hossain Jahangir said.



    He said Bangladesh had from time to time raised its concerns through ‘proper channel’ to India over the fall in the flows of the Ganges, known as Padma inside Bangladesh.



    ‘India received the guaranteed share of 35,000 cusec of water in the last 10 days of March, and we got the same amount in the 10 days prior, as stipulated in the treaty,’ the JRC member said.



    The Ganges flows in Bangladesh began to fall since January this year due to ‘unilateral withdrawal’ of waters upstream in India, said officials concerned.



    Bangladesh-India joint committee members are expected to monitor the Ganges flows at Farakka point next week to see whether lower riparian Bangladesh was receiving water in accordance with the treaty, a senior JRC official in Dhaka told New Age.



    The 1996 treaty on sharing of Ganges water stipulated joint monitoring of the Ganges flows at two sharing points, Farakka feeder canal in India and Hardigne Bridge point in Bangladesh.



    The bilateral treaty provides for sharing the Ganges flows during the dry season, spanning January 1 and May 31. For the sharing, the dry months are split into 15 periods each of 10 days. And the treaty allocates separate shares to the two countries for each 10-day period.



    ‘In the event flow at Farakka falls below 50,000 cusecs in any 10-day period, the two governments will enter into immediate consultations to make adjustments on an emergency basis, in accordance with the principles of equity, fair play and no-harm to either party,’ says the treaty.



    Bangladesh received 35,387 cusecs of Ganges water at the Hardinge point against 50,154 cusec indicative share stipulated in the treaty for the last 10 days of January this year.



    The indicative schedule in the treaty was worked out on the basis of 40-year average flows from 1949 to 1988.



    Water resources minister Anisul Islam Mahmud at a recent discussion in the city said that the Ganges water flows inside Bangladesh had fallen drastically in March, affecting lives and livelihood in Khunla and Rajshahi regions.



    He said that the US$ four-billion Ganges Barrage Project must be implemented to meet the acute water crisis and also to protect biodiversity in the country’s south and north.



    The minister said salinity was increasing in the Khulna belt due to low flow in the cross-border river Padma while people in Rajshahi region were facing acute water crisis and depending more on ground water.



    The salinity intrusion rose abruptly in the south-western part of the country immediately after the commissioning of the Farakkah Barrage over the trans-boundary river Ganges by India in 1975.



    Increasing salinity was affecting crop production and shrinking fresh water availability in the country’s south-western region, posing threat to lives and livelihood in around one-thirds of the whole country, said water experts.



    Bangladesh and India share 54 common rivers and until now they could manage only one agreement, that for sharing the Ganges waters for 30 years starting 1996.





    http://newagebd.net/...ince-96-treaty/
     
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  3. rockey 71

    rockey 71 Regular Member

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    20 Mar 2016, 17:14:10

    BD sees drastic fall in Padma water flow this time


    Dhaka, Mar 20: Water Resources Minister Anisul Islam Mahmud on Sunday said Bangladesh experienced a drastic fall in the Padma River’s water flow during this dry season.



    “Generally, we get at least 65,000 Cusec (cubic feet per second) of water in the Padma River, but we got only 25,000 Cusec of water in the river during dry season this year,” he told the inaugural session of a conference.



    The minister said he did not know why the water flow rapidly declined in the Padma River this year, and his ministry is now looking into the matter to identify the reasons.



    Twelve non-government organisations, including Bangladesh Paribesh Andolan (BAPA), Water Rights Forum, Transparency International Bangladesh (TIB), Nijera Kori and Bangladesh Water Integrity Network, jointly organised the two-day National Water Rights Conference 2016 at Krishibid Institution auditorium in the capital.



    Anisul Islam Mahmud said the water flow in the Teesta River also drastically declined to 355 Cusec during the dry season last year with Bangladesh getting 1200-1300 Cusec of water this time on average.



    About water crisis in the Barind region, he said once the proposed Ganges Barrage Project is implemented, the water would be diverted to the rivers of the Barind region, resolving its persisting water crisis.



    The Barind region is the largest Pleistocene era pysiographic unit in Bangladesh covering most of Dinajpur, Rangpur, Pabna, Rajshahi and Bogra, which faces drought during every dry season for lack of water.



    Apart from the water crisis in the Barind region, Mahmud said water problems in the country’s southwestern region would be addressed removing the salinity by ensuring the water flow of the rivers of the region if the barrage project is implemented.



    He said the government is committed to implementing the Ganges Barrage Project while a feasibility study of the project has already been completed and the government is working to mobilise fund to implement the project.



    About the people’s right to water, the Water Resources Minister said if Bangladesh is able to manage its rivers, canals and wetlands, it will be possible to ensure the people’s right to water.



    To do so, he said, now the Water Resources Ministry is implementing projects involving local people so that they can maintain water resources on completion of the projects.



    Chaired by Nijera Kori coordinator Khushi Kabir, the inaugural session of the water conference was addressed, among others, by member of parliamentary standing committee on Water Resources Ministry AKM Fazlul Haque, member of parliamentary standing committee on the Environment and Forests Ministry Md Yasin Ali and Bapa secretary general Abdul Matin, according to UNB. –RH





    http://www.thefinanc...016/03/20/22130
     
  4. saty

    saty Tihar Jail Banned

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    Hey rockey, do you know how many dams BD constructed(storage) and how much cu-secs of water discharged(wasted) into sea annually?

    As far as i know BD has very few dams and millions of water dumped into sea.
     
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  5. rockey 71

    rockey 71 Regular Member

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    1.We are the lower Brahmaputra-Gangetic delta. Not the right location for building dams. In any case, dams are now discouraged by environmentalists. We have only one hydel dam over R Karnafuli built by the Americans in the 60's. It is hardly of any use these days.

    2. The issue here is the unilateral and unlawful as well as unethical withdrawal of waters from ALL our rivers upstream by India.
     
  6. saty

    saty Tihar Jail Banned

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    What!! means you don't have any dam. :facepalm:

    Bro... In any circumstances you must have few dams to store (waste-dumping into sea) water.Future is not easy for all of us.BD is a small country and have some xyz problems but FEW DAMS are MUST.If not possible ask any Indian/Chini companies we are building number of dams every year may build 3 or 4 in BD too .
     
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  7. Bornubus

    Bornubus Senior Member Senior Member

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    Uttarakhand,UP,Bihar and West Bengal have first right over Ganga Water.It is the way it is and will of ALLAH.
     
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  8. rockey 71

    rockey 71 Regular Member

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    March 29, 2015

    Ganges Barrage Project blessing for country

    Say experts

    Unb, Dhaka



    [​IMG]



    The proposed Ganges Barrage Project will be a blessing for Bangladesh since the country is a low riparian area facing water-related problems, according to experts.



    Noted water expert Prof Ainun Nishat said the Ganges Barrage Project should be implemented as soon as possible to protect the country's south-western region, including the Sundarbans.



    The government has already completed the feasibility study and design of the proposed 2.1km long Ganges Barrage Project at Pangsha of Rajbari, some 98km downstream from the Farakka Barrage built in the Paschimbanga state of India.



    The proposed project has a reservoir to augment the flow of water and its equal distribution, in both dry and wet season, over the Ganges dependent area. The project will meet the demand of the Ganges water for agriculture, fisheries, ecosystems and navigation, experts and officials say.



    Director (water resources) of Dhaka-based Centre for Environmental and Geographic Information Services M Sarfaraz Wahed said Bangladesh will benefit from the project in all aspects -- salinity will be reduced considerably and all dead rivers of the region will be recharged after implementation of the project.



    He said the Gorai river system with its augmented flow will provide an improved navigational route to and from Mongla, the country's second seaport.



    Environmental expert Dr Atiq Rahman said the Ganges Barrage is a long-standing project which has been discussed in the last several decades.



    "Obviously, Bangladesh will benefit from the project but it's necessary to conduct vigorous environmental, social and climate impact assessments before implementation of the project," he said.



    Official sources said the increased water flow through the Hisna-Mathabhanga, Gorai-Modhumati and Chandana-Barasia systems will reduce environmental degradation in the Ganges dependent area. The surface water salinity will be reduced due to increased upstream water flow.



    About US$4 billion is needed to implement the Ganges Barrage Project, but the annual incremental benefit of the project will be Tk 7,340 crore, which means the cost of the barrage project will be returned within five years, they claimed.



    According to the feasibility study, once the project is implemented, agricultural production in the Ganges dependent area will increase while additional paddy production would be about 26 lakh metric tonnes, minimising the loss of paddy significantly. Additional fish production would be about 2.4 lakh metric tonnes.





    http://www.thedailys...g-country-74393

    October 26, 2015

    PM for barrage on Padma with Indo-Bangla venture

    She tells outgoing Indian High Commissioner Pankaj

    Unb, Dhaka



    Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina yesterday stressed developing Ganges Barrage on the Padma River in Bangladesh under a joint venture project between Bangladesh and India.



    She came up with the view when outgoing Indian High Commissioner in Dhaka Pankaj Saran met her at her office.



    After the meeting, PM's Press Secretary Ihsanul Karim briefed reporters.



    The government has already completed the feasibility study and design of the proposed 2.1km long Ganges Barrage Project at Pangsha in Rajbari, some 98km downstream from the Farakka Barrage built in Pashchimbanga, India.



    The proposed project has a reservoir to augment the flow of water and its equal distribution, in both dry and rainy seasons, over the Ganges-dependent area. The project will meet the demand of Ganges water for agriculture, fisheries, ecosystem and navigation. About US$4 billion is needed to implement the project. Once the project is implemented, the feasibility study says, agricultural production in the Ganges-dependent area will increase while additional paddy production would be about 26 lakh metric tonnes, minimising the loss of paddy significantly. Additional fish production would be about 2.4 lakh metric tonnes.



    Hasina expressed satisfaction over the smooth implementation of Land Boundary Agreement and its protocol on both sides.



    Appreciating Prime Minister Narendra Modi's leadership, Hasina thanked the Indian government for its cooperation with Bangladesh in energy sector. “Now we would like to go to the next step which is sub-regional cooperation,” she said.



    Referring to India's eagerness on developing Paira and other Deep Sea ports in Bangladesh, Hasina said her government has taken the due note of India's interest.



    About the ongoing discussion between India's Oil Company and Petro Bangla of Bangladesh over the construction of LPG Terminal and transportation of LPG to Tripura through Bangladesh, Hasina said her government is examining India's proposal. Pankaj Saran praised Hasina's leadership in bolstering the bilateral ties.





    http://www.thedailys...-venture-162541
     
  9. bose

    bose Senior Member Senior Member

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    India should restart the river linking project immediately and bring more land under water irrigation, Indian farmers should not be at mercy of nature ...
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2016
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  10. rockey 71

    rockey 71 Regular Member

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    1.Farakka was a sick mind's idea. It helps no Indian farmer but harms millions of BD farmers. The project's objective is to improve navigability of Kolkata Port.

    2. During 1971 War Pakistan had a plan to blow up the dam. We would be thanking them today if they had succeeded.
     
  11. bose

    bose Senior Member Senior Member

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    Kolkata port has become un usable now for big ships due to heavy silting ... Thanks to Jyoti Basu's over enthusiasm on Farakka accord...

    We would have come up with a bigger one then...
     
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  12. Dovah

    Dovah Untermensch Senior Member

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    You would probably be thanking the Pakis if they would have continue with the rape and genocide considering you are a bloody razakar,
     
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  13. Bornubus

    Bornubus Senior Member Senior Member

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    Pakis would've never done that,they know where there jugular veins lie.India can make Paki punjab desert if we want and give them very slow death,we can also contaminate their rivers with carcinogen and harmful substance to impose economic cost on Pakis.

    LT. Gen Raj Kadiyan once opined that India should dump IWT and divert its water to Punjab,Haryana and Rajasthan.

    http://www.asiantribune.com/news/2012/02/16/water-terrorism-india-overawe-pakistan


    http://tribune.com.pk/story/274344/india-pakistan-issues-forget-kashmir-terrorism-worry-about-water/

    http://www.theatlantic.com/internat...w-big-threat-isnt-terrorism-its-water/277970/
     
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  14. bose

    bose Senior Member Senior Member

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    @Bornubus It is estimated that there are some 250 rives streams [ small & big] goes into Bangladesh from India including North East India... Bangladesh is very venerable positions if India starts to Dam them or linking those river for irrigation purpose...
     
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  15. Bornubus

    Bornubus Senior Member Senior Member

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    But we should take huge advantage from Bangladesh for our water which is a precious resource.

    We should demand them free passage and relieve pressure from Chicken Neck corridor and most importantly BD should not give refuge to anti Indian elements.

    Otherwise more DAMS coming.India is world leader in Dam Making and related engineering for more than 100 Years.


    Baghmundi Dam, Purulia West Bengal



    [​IMG]

    Messanjore Jharkhand

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]



    Maithan Dam

    [​IMG]

    Muradi Dam

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

     
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  16. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    There has been a less supply of water this year. BD can play the blame game, but we have no control over nature.
     
  17. aliyah

    aliyah Regular Member

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    ppl die less due to floods from past few year. no thanks for that??
    Israel dont even get wat ur getting. but they making there own water from sea.
    save water....water is precious.....dont only cry all time.
     
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  18. Panjab47

    Panjab47 सर्वाग्रेक्षत्रियाजट्टादेवकल्पादृढ़व्रता|੧੫| Banned

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    Should cut off all water to both bakistan.
     
  19. rockey 71

    rockey 71 Regular Member

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  20. rockey 71

    rockey 71 Regular Member

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    http://www.americanrivers.org/initiatives/dams/why-remove/

    How Do Dams Damage Rivers?
    1. Dams reduce river levels

    By diverting water for power, dams remove water needed for healthy in-stream ecosystems. Stretches below dams are often completely de-watered.

    2. Dams block rivers

    Dams prevent the flow of plants and nutrients, impede the migration of fish and other wildlife, and block recreational use. Fish passage structures can enable a percentage of fish to pass around a dam, but multiple dams along a river make safe travel unlikely.

    3. Dams slow rivers

    Many fish species, such as salmon, depend on steady flows to flush them downriver early in their life and guide them upstream years later to spawn. Stagnant reservoir pools disorient migrating fish and significantly increase the duration of their migration.

    4. Dams alter water temperatures

    By slowing water flow, most dams increase water temperatures. Other dams decrease temperatures by releasing cooled water from the reservoir bottom. Fish and other species are sensitive to these temperature irregularities, which often destroy native populations.

    5. Dams alter timing of flows

    By withholding and then releasing water to generate power for peak demand periods, dams cause downstream stretches to alternate between no water and powerful surges that erode soil and vegetation, and flood or strand wildlife. These irregular releases destroy natural seasonal flow variations that trigger natural growth and reproduction cycles in many species.

    6. Dams fluctuate reservoir levels

    Peaking power operations can cause dramatic changes in reservoir water levels — often up to 40 feet — which degrade shorelines and disturb fisheries, waterfowl, and bottom-dwelling organisms.

    7. Dams decrease oxygen levels in reservoir waters

    When oxygen-deprived water is released from behind the dam, it kills fish downstream.

    8. Dams hold back silt, debris, and nutrients

    By slowing flows, dams allow silt to collect on river bottoms and bury fish spawning habitat. Silt trapped above dams accumulates heavy metals and other pollutants. Gravel, logs and other debris are also trapped by dams, eliminating their use downstream as food and habitat.

    9. Dam turbines hurt fish

    Following currents downstream, fish can be injured or killed by turbines. When fish are trucked or barged around the dams, they experience increased stress and disease and decreased homing instincts.

    10. Dams increase predator risk

    Warm, murky reservoirs often favor predators of naturally occurring species. In addition, passage through fish ladders or turbines injure or stun fish, making them easy prey for flying predators like gulls and herons.

    More Information About How Dams and Rivers
    - See more at: http://www.americanrivers.org/initiatives/dams/why-remove/#sthash.eKNMheec.dpuf
     
  21. Navnit Kundu

    Navnit Kundu Pika Hu Akbarrr!! Senior Member

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    Agreed. The nature of that advantage is not clear but what's clear is that they receive immense benefit from our dams, and they should be made to share the construction and maintenance costs.

    BD has made all the efforts that any sane government could make to help India. It is Manmohan Sinhg's lack of initiative which scuttled the momentum. I think the utility of free passage through BD has very limited military advantage. Even if BD government gave us a signed paper assuring us the right of passage, tomorrow if we need to use the road to transport soldiers to troubled areas in NE or Myanmar or LAC, then it wont be the legal document which would be the bottleneck/force multiplier. Our enemy, (whoever we are fighting at that time), will always find ways to sneak saboteurs into Bangladesh and the only way to continue using the road would be through use of force, BD's legal and moral position notwithstanding. The legal agreement isn't worth the paper it's written on since BD doesn't have the military might to enforce it in case it is challenged by another power. We will have to enforce it ourselves.

    The best way to overcome this is to base our strategic assets like ammo manufacturing units, ammo dumps, missile defense systems and other things to be built in NE itself, so we don't have to rely on transporting those things in the first place. That's the shortest path to resupplying our troops. Once that is done, the only variable that remains floating is the troops. We can add or remove troops based on the required force structure and it can be done without reliance on hostile terrain to transport.

    Sign some sort of weapons/ammo deal with Myanamar to sell ammo to them, so that our factories and assembly lines stationed in NE remain active and profitable. When war breaks out, we can use these factories to supply our army.

    Do a quick google search and try to find out the groups which are spreading disinformation, galvanizing negative public opinion and protesting against any attempts at river linking. Hint : Communists.
     
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