Flooding makes 60,000 homeless in Sindh

Discussion in 'Members Corner' started by Blackwater, Aug 18, 2011.

  1. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    KARACHI: Devastating rains have triggered floods in southern Pakistan, affecting at least 700,000 people and forcing 60,000 from their homes, officials said Wednesday.


    Villages have been flooded and crops destroyed in Pakistan’s Sindh province, one of the worst-hit areas in the unprecedented floods of 2010 that affected 21 million people and caused losses of $10 billion.

    “At least 700,000 people have been affected by the floods caused by the recent rains in the six districts of Sindh province,” Sajjad Haider Shah, an official in the provincial disaster management authority, told AFP.

    “Some 60,000 people have been rendered homeless, who have migrated to safer areas,” Shah said, adding that 30 people had been killed in the past week.

    Another senior government official confirmed the number of people affected.

    Sindh chief minister Syed Qaim Ali Shah told reporters overnight that one million people had been affected, but provided no details.

    Tens of thousands of people are still living in emergency camps after last year’s floods and British charity Oxfam has accused Pakistan of failing to invest in prevention measures, making it vulnerable to further disaster.

    The army and navy are using helicopters and boats to rescue people who are trapped by the fresh floodwaters, said Kazim Jatoi, the chief administrator in Badin district.

    “The soldiers of the army and navy are relentlessly shifting people from the dangerous places to the safer areas,” Jatoi said.

    Pakistan’s government came under enormous criticism last year from victims of the floods who said ministers did little to help.

    Pakistan’s largest charity, the Edhi Foundation, called for a comprehensive relief effort Wednesday to help those at risk.

    “We are providing food and necessary items to the people to survive, but that is not much and more people and organisations will have to intervene in the situation,” Edhi Foundation’s Anwer Kazmi told AFP.

    Jatoi said makeshift relief camps had been set up in 150 school buildings, but said there was an urgent need for tents and food.

    “We are trying to provide every family a shelter, which requires a large number of tents.”

    Shah, the disaster management authority official, said crops had been destroyed and houses flooded.

    “Badin is the most affected district, where more than half the total people have been displaced,” he said.

    Rains have also caused havoc in the districts of Tando Mohammad Khan, Mirpurkhas, Thar, Umerkot and Tando Allahyar.

    The meteorological office has forecast more rain in coming days.:tsk::tsk::tsk:

    Flooding makes 60,000 homeless in Sindh | Provinces | DAWN.COM
     
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  3. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    [​IMG]

    Poor pakistani" kabhi babebesi ne mara ,kabhi bekhudi ne mara":pound::pound::pound:


    Too many affectees and too few goods compelled flood victims to start snatching away relief goods.




    After the PM had left and when the scrambling started, the police personnel present on the scene baton-charged the people to bring the situation under control.



    Some affectees sustained injuries while others had to run away empty handed in a bid to escape the baton charge.



    Those who had to go without any relief goods complained that despite sitting through the Prime Minister s speech all they received was baton charge.



    Earlier, Prime Minister Gilani who was on a day-long visit to witness the damages caused by heavy rains and flooding, directed the National Disaster Management Authority to provide tents, food, medicines and all other facilities to the displaced at the relief camps set up at different locations.
     
  4. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Fact Sheet 01: Pakistan Floods-2011

    Latest News
    Written by Advocacy and Research Unit
    August 17, 2011
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    With the recent onslaught of monsoon season, some 750,000 people are affected in Pakistan’s provinces of Punjab and Sindh killing up to 25 people. District Badin in Sindh emerged as the most severely hit area.


    The district comprises of 5 Talukas (Badin, Shahheed Fazil Rahu, Talhar, Matli and Tando Bago) and has a total area of 6,726 square kilometers. According to the 1998 census of Pakistan, it had a population of 1,136,636 of which 16.42% were urban. Headquartered at the city of Badin the district is situated between 24°-5` to 25°-25` north latitude and 68 21’ to 69 20’ east longitude and is bounded on the north by District Hyderabad on the east by Mirpurkhas and Tharparkar districts on the south the Arabian Sea and Rann of Kutch, which also forms part of the disputed boundary with India, and on the west it is bounded by districts Thatta and Hyderabad.
    1.The District has 46 Union councils; out of which 16 are completely under water. The major cause of flood is the breaches in canals and drains, especially the Left Bank Outfall Drain (LBOD), that remain unplugged.
    2.The ongoing catastrophe has affected a population of little more than 100,000 in Badin alone.
    3.The configuration of IDPS in District Badin is as follows



    S. No

    Name of Taluka

    Number of IDPs



    1

    Matli

    2,878



    2

    Talhar

    4,163



    3

    Tand Bago

    11,247



    4

    Badin

    14,087



    5

    Shahheed Fazil Rahu

    3,676

    4.In Badin, nearly 80 percent of the crops are destroyed and 1500 villages are flooded.
    5.As reported by the media, people of the area demanded Rs. 100 million in financial support, 200 suction pumps. 2,000 tents, 50 boats and 100,000 ration bags
    6.Three irrigation canals were affected: Phuleli Canal, Akram Wah Canal and Guni Canal.
    7.Fresh breaches are developing in water ways and drains inundated another 20 villages, including the village of Golarchi.
    8.As many as 36,204 people in 144 relief camps have been accommodated. The number included 8,240 women and 20,253 children.
    9.The total number of people rescued in Badin is 362,400 and Pakistan Army alone has rescued 200 families in Badin and provided medical care to 500 people.
    10.In Mirpurkhas some 15,000 people have taken shelter in make ragged make-shift tents along roads and in school building, where the army has been called out to rescue them
    11.Damage to cotton crops, which is already in harvesting stages, in Badin is 80 percent and 20-30 percent in Mirpurkhas area.


    Fact Sheet 01: Pakistan Floods-2011 - CWS-P/A
     
  5. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    what Pak govt is doing ???hmmm importing more missile from china claiming that they are theres:tsk::tsk:

    Every year its the same story,same floods,same randi rona by pak, same blaming India for realising water:tsk::tsk:
     
  6. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Pakistan flood crisis as bad as African famines, UN says

    [​IMG]


    A "humanitarian crisis of epic proportions" is unfolding in flood-hit areas of southern Pakistan where malnutrition rates rival those of African countries affected by famine, according to the United Nations.

    In Sindh province, where some villages are still under water six months after the floods, almost one quarter of children under five are malnourished while 6% are severely underfed, a Floods Assessment Needs survey has found.

    "I haven't seen malnutrition this bad since the worst of the famine in Ethiopia, Darfur and Chad. It's shockingly bad," said Karen Allen, deputy head of Unicef in Pakistan.

    The survey reflects the continuing impact of the massive August floods, which affected 20 million people across an area the size of England, sweeping away 2.2m hectares of farmland.

    The figures were alarming, Neva Khan, of Oxfam, said.

    "Emergency aid right after the floods saved many lives, but, as these figures show, millions are at serious risk," she said.

    Kristen Elsby, a Unicef official, called it a "humanitarian crisis of epic proportions".

    But the figures highlight a broader truth: that Sindh, a ragged province where poor peasants toil under powerful landlords, has long had some of the worst poverty levels in South Asia.

    "This sort of thing doesn't happen overnight. It indicates deep, slow-grinding poverty," said Dorothy Blane, of Concern.

    The most recent nutrition survey across Pakistan in 2002 found a national malnutrition rate of 13.2%. The survey of 786 households, jointly carried out by the UN, aid agencies and the government, recorded global malnutrition rates of 23.1% in northern Sindh and 21.2% in the southern part of the province.

    The survey was done in early November but Pakistan's government, reluctant to publish the figures, delayed their publication, according to several aid officials. Figures for southern Punjab, which was also badly hit, have yet to be finalised.

    Sindh is Pakistan's third largest province and home to some of the country's deepest inequalities. Karachi is a bustling business hub of more than 16 million people. But in the countryside, feudal traditions are strong, illiteracy is rife and government services are often non-existent.

    Health workers in refugee camps hosting flood victims from rural Sindh reported that some expectant mothers had never seen a doctor.

    Across Pakistan, most of the 14 million people who fled their homes in August are rebuilding their lives. According to the UNHCR some 166,000 people are living in 240 camps and roadside settlements, down from 3.3 million in October.

    Much western aid has been pumped into a scheme to give flood victims direct financial aid, starting with a payment of £150. Some aid workers say it is prone to corruption.

    The UK donated £114m which funded shelter for 1.3 million people and clean water for 2.5 million.

    But more money is urgently needed. A UN appeal for $2bn to help people survive until this summer has only 56% of the funding.

    Before the floods the western aid effort in Pakistan focused on the north-west, where an earthquake struck in 2005 and military operations against the Taliban have displaced millions.

    After the floods, aid workers admit to being caught offguard by the problem in Sindh. "It was a real wake-up call," said one.

    Some villages in northern Sindh remain under water, and where the water has cleared, irrigation systems lie destroyed, raising concerns for the next harvest this summer.

    And some things will take more than food or shelter to solve. A majority of children in flood-affected areas suffer from anxiety, depression and phobias, according to a study by Save the Children.

    Of the children surveyed, 70% expressed fear of "people, water, open places and darkness", it found.

    Pakistan flood crisis as bad as African famines, UN says | World news | The Guardian
     
  7. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Sutlej flood hits crops, 20 villages:shocked::shocked::whistle::whistle::tsk::tsk:



    KASUR: Standing crops over 10,000 acres and more than 20 villages were affected by a medium flood as the level of water released by India:lol::lol::shocked::shocked::sad::sad: in the Sutlej rose to 88,0000 cusecs on Wednesday.

    The situation in Hakowla, Bhakhiwind, Chanda Singhwala, Mahiwala, Mustayki and Kalanger villages is alarming but people are reluctant to leave their places despite hectic efforts being made by the district administration.

    The administration, however, claimed that the situation was under control and it had made arrangements to cope with any eventuality.

    At least 12 houses collapsed in Hakowla but there was no loss of life. The inhabitants are using boats but reluctant to leave their homes.

    Floodwater in Bhikhiwind, Chanda Singh, Mahiwala, Mustayki, Kalanger and Dhoop Sari inundated roads and streets. Crops of maize, rice and fodder have been inundated.

    After the surge at Bakarkay post, floodwater entered Jallokay village and Rescue 1122 staff evacuated about 25 people.

    People in the affected areas are feeling worried because of light rain and cloudy weather throughout the day.

    According to villagers, the administration distributed cooked food and other items for Sahar and Iftar.

    Sutlej flood hits crops, 20 villages | Newspaper | DAWN.COM
     
  8. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Yeah impotent pakistani cant make dams on there side and blame India for realising water, blame India for kashmir, blame India for Palestine:sad::sad:,, corrupting there society through bollywood, wats next??:shocked::shocked::whistle::whistle::confused::confused:
     

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