"Fighting to the End: The Pakistan Army's Way of War"

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by Ray, Jun 9, 2014.

  1. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    "Fighting to the End: The Pakistan Army's Way of War"



    An interesting summary that is worth listening to.

    Interesting comments on Pakistan's interest in Kashmir and Afghanistan and how the US cannot take these areas as necessary for its security requirement and instead it is an ideological issue that cannot be satiated.

    Since Pakistan was founded in 1947, its army has dominated the state. The military establishment has locked the country in an enduring rivalry with India, with the primary aim of wresting Kashmir from it. To that end, Pakistan initiated three wars over Kashmir-in 1947, 1965, and 1999-and failed to win any of them. Today, the army continues to prosecute this dangerous policy by employing non-state actors under the security of its ever-expanding nuclear umbrella. It has sustained a proxy war in Kashmir since 1989 using Islamist militants, as well as supporting non-Islamist insurgencies throughout India and a country-wide Islamist terror campaign that have brought the two countries to the brink of war on several occasions. In addition to these territorial revisionist goals, the Pakistani army has committed itself to resisting India's slow but inevitable rise on the global stage.
    Despite Pakistan's efforts to coerce India, it has achieved only modest successes at best. Even though India vivisected Pakistan in 1971, Pakistan continues to see itself as India's equal and demands the world do the same. The dangerous methods that the army uses to enforce this self-perception have brought international opprobrium upon Pakistan and its army. And in recent years, their erstwhile proxies have turned their guns on the Pakistani state itself.

    Why does the army persist in pursuing these revisionist policies that have come to imperil the very viability of the state itself, from which the army feeds? In Fighting to the End, C. Christine Fair argues that the answer lies, at least partially, in the strategic culture of the army. Through an unprecedented analysis of decades' worth of the army's own defense publications, she concludes that from the army's distorted view of history, it is victorious as long as it can resist India's purported drive for regional hegemony as well as the territorial status quo. Simply put, acquiescence means defeat. Fighting to the End convincingly shows that because the army is unlikely to abandon these preferences, Pakistan will remain a destabilizing force in world politics for the foreseeable future.

    Despite Pakistan's efforts to coerce India, it has achieved only modest successes at best. Even though India vivisected Pakistan in 1971, Pakistan continues to see itself as India's equal and demands the world do the same. The dangerous methods that the army uses to enforce this self-perception have brought international opprobrium upon Pakistan and its army. And in recent years, their erstwhile proxies have turned their guns on the Pakistani state itself.

    Why does the army persist in pursuing these revisionist policies that have come to imperil the very viability of the state itself, from which the army feeds? In Fighting to the End, C. Christine Fair argues that the answer lies, at least partially, in the strategic culture of the army. Through an unprecedented analysis of decades' worth of the army's own defense publications, she concludes that from the army's distorted view of history, it is victorious as long as it can resist India's purported drive for regional hegemony as well as the territorial status quo. Simply put, acquiescence means defeat. Fighting to the End convincingly shows that because the army is unlikely to abandon these preferences, Pakistan will remain a destabilizing force in world politics for the foreseeable future.
    http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/fighting-to-the-end-c-christine-fair/1117308839?ean=9780199892709
     
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  3. Neo

    Neo Senior Member Senior Member

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  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    I wonder where it has been discussed.

    I saw the link in Small War Journal and have just about finished listen to it.

    Most fascinating.

    It has still not come to India. I am already ordering for a copy.

    I will be sending the author my article that was published long ago and the Pak Military and Governance in a professional journal. It will add to her repertoire of the rational.

    Personally I feel that all those who are in the military should read it and so should our politicians like Modi and Jaitley so as to get a different view that is not the stereotype.
     
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  5. Neo

    Neo Senior Member Senior Member

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  6. Neo

    Neo Senior Member Senior Member

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    I am curious about your article. Do you have a link?
    Thanks!
     
  7. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    No that magazine does not have a link, but long ago I reproduced some parts in the WAB when discussing the issue with IIRC one Aryan.

    One of the issues was the jockeying (especially during the formative years) that was their between the Mohajir who were better educated and controlled all instruments of democracy (political, bureaucratic, legal and commerce) wherein they made the 'sons of the soil' who were feudal and illiterate second class (in a manner of speaking) and the military, who were the backbone of the son of the soil and how they clawed back their share in the sun, they being all from the 'son of the soil' stock and how Kashmir came to their rescue.

    And so started the seesaw of Pak governance.
     
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  8. Neo

    Neo Senior Member Senior Member

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    I wonder if its still there, I haven't posted in WAB for months and my 9000+ posts.are gone. :cry:

    Are you referring to Aryan from the first PDf? He was a good guy, I wonder if he's still active.

    Your fights with Aryan and Asim were a treat, I mis that.:sad:
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2014
  9. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Asim became a friend.

    It was however great to debate with him.
     
  10. tarunraju

    tarunraju Moderator Moderator

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    Yeah right, Pakis do fight to the end. Perfectly explains the 90,000+ POWs we took in 1971. :rolleyes:
     
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