Exploitation of Child and Labour in China

Discussion in 'China' started by badguy2000, Jul 30, 2012.

  1. badguy2000

    badguy2000 Respected Member Senior Member

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    street begging is a human right abuses by far more serious than such a training

    pls remeber: many indian kids are begging in street while many chinese kids are accepting such acute training.......
     
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  3. Predator

    Predator Regular Member

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    Re: Olympics: The difference between India and China is… family

    ^ oh really, no child beggars in china? then read on

    The Truth About Beggars in China

    The beggars in China are a heartbreaking situation. The poorest of families are scammed into giving away their young children for money to survive. There are promises that money will be sent back to the parents. These children disappear to another town, another province, and are then forced to be slaves their whole lives. They never see their family again. The parents never see any money.

    There are a lot of beggars in the cities. They are everywhere you look, where people are shopping, on the overpass street bridges, at bus stops, on any street corner. I have been told that they come in from the countryside in droves in the summertime.

    Cruel Amputations to Children Beggars in China
    In order to elicit sympathy and collect more money, the children usually have one or more of their limbs cruelly amputated. These poor children and young adults pull themselves along the streets, filthy, on their bellies or on low wheeled carts. It is pitiful and heart-wrenching to watch. When giving money to the beggars in China, they don’t benefit from the money. It is organized crime that takes all the money. For the beggars, there is no way out. No one will help them escape their life of misery and they are usually too incapacitated to do anything else.

    Beggars in China run by Organized Crime
    When living in Guangzhou, there was a young beggar girl on the street everyday without a coat. It was cold, so we gave her money to buy a coat, but everyday, she came back and sat on the cold sidewalk without a coat. We thought maybe she didn't know how to buy herself a coat, so we bought her a coat, thinking that would solve the problem. But much to our surprise, she showed up the next day, in the same place, sitting on the cold cement - with no coat. It was staged - all to create more sympathy and collect more money from those with big hearts.

    Very often, a child pauper will run up to you,dirty, thin, with no shoes, and try to sell you a flower. They will know a few words of English and try to tell you how beautiful you are. They will hold on to your sleeve and walk with you. It is difficult to shake them off. Sometimes, several children will come up and hang on to you and you have to pry them off your clothes. Close by will be an adult supervising them. It is all organized. It is good to know a few words of Chinese so you can work yourself free.

    Beggars in China for Life Threatening Needs
    Sometimes on the street, someone will kneel down on the pavement, write a message in chalk on the ground - or on a scrap piece of paper, describing their most horrible predicament, and bow to the ground endlessly, for hours and hours, begging for money to help them in their most hopeless situation. Often, it is someone begging for money for a family member or close friend who needs surgery, but has no money. Or it could be that someone has lost their job or their home and need money to eat.

    Beggars in China from Disfiguration or Accidents
    Then there are those who become paupers out of necessity. Through some accident, they have become disfigured in some way and cannot find work because of their disablement or their looks. Their family often disowns them. This is truly sad – and begging is their only form of income for survival. But it is hard to tell who is who.

    Beggars in China for Sport
    And then there are those who are beggars for sport. It is reported that those who beg for a living actually bring in more money per month than the average worker, so some people are faking be destitute or impoverished and just taking the handouts instead of working for a living. Begging has become their career!

    Chinese Hate Them
    Most Chinese hate the people who are begging and tell them bluntly to go away. They are disgusted by their appearance and that they ask for money.

    Foreigners Easy Target
    Foreigners are an easier target for those in the begging occupation. Be careful if you decide to give some loose change. They can be aggressive and get quite close to you and want more. If I felt I wanted to give something - I would often get my money out and wallet back into my zippered bag before I approached someone who looked destitute or had their hand out for money. Sometimes, I would give a meal or drink - instead of giving cash. At least that way, money would not be passed on to the unscrupulous people using the beggars - and the paupers would get a drink or a meal - at the very least.

    There was one occasion when I was shopping on a Saturday afternoon when a teenage girl approached me and asked me if I would give her money for a meal. She told me, in pretty good English, that she and her friends had traveled from a distant province to try to find a job in Guangzhou. There were 6 of them. On the train, their money had been stolen - and they hadn't eaten for more than a day. I knew that this type of thing does happen on trains - and I took pity on them. Rather than giving them cash, I took them to a close by restaurant and ordered up a meal for them, paid for it and left. From the way they tore into their food, I felt satisfied that their story was true. When I told my husband how I had helped these girls, he was livid. He was concerned for my safety, walking around by myself. He thought I might have been conned and had my money stolen or gotten into some kind of danger. I never thought of that. However, it was something to consider. My bleeding heart had wanted to bring them all home for the night and ask my husband if he would give them a job in his factory, but I guess it was a good thing I didn't! There is just so much going on that you don't know about as a foreigner. Too many con games.

    Beggars in China - The Horrible Truth
     
  4. huaxia rox

    huaxia rox Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Olympics: The difference between India and China is… family

    yes there r young beggars in prc but i think much fewer than those in india and to say the least their eyeballs r not dug out by their controllers systematically.....
     
  5. satish007

    satish007 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Olympics: The difference between India and China is… family

    Mr. ROX, Indian know the fact, but it is not good two countries compare whose worse. only correct way is Chinese able to help them or please quiet.
    Many countries,organizations are helping poor families. hopefully more Chinese will join them.
    and please notice my Avator, Sikh don't like beggar, they opinion is noboby should be beggar, if there is one, that means they really need help, they will help proactive
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2012
  6. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Re: Olympics: The difference between India and China is… family

    Again everything of Chinese people boils down to money.

    Is being a family and living as a family a disgusting distraction in China?

    So instead of enjoying life as a family, all you are interested is making money.

    That is why you all are so ruthless and without emotions!
     
  7. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Re: Olympics: The difference between India and China is… family

    No there are no beggars in China.

    It is western propaganda!

    Those pictures are false and doctored.

    Isn't that right?
     
  8. huaxia rox

    huaxia rox Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Olympics: The difference between India and China is… family

    yes....its about money to some extent in many cases of what has been mentioned here otherwise some of these children could become beggars coz their families r poor....sad yet ture......but i m sure they want their children to make money via sports rather than making money on the street via begging........which is more human???
     
  9. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Re: Olympics: The difference between India and China is… family

    Now just see this western propaganda aimed to insult and make China lose face


    ********************************************

    Charity in China: The Low Down on Street Begging

    f you live in a Chinese east coast metropolis, with all its Western brand paraphernalia, it's easy to forget that China is still a developing country. In a typical month you're likely to see more chauffeured Rolls Royces than hand tended rice paddies. It won't be too long however, before China does what it does best and upsets your established perceptions. Street beggars, often terribly disfigured by untreated medical conditions or industrial accidents, serve as stark evidence that not all Chinese are riding their country's wave of development. And if you're a Westerner, it is quite probable that soon into your stay in China, you'll be approached by a beggar and reminded of the true nature of your expat reality. This article will take a look at why Western expats are particularly singled out by Chinese beggars, what kinds of beggars there are in China and what you should do if approached for money.

    Why foreigners are first targets

    The obvious answer to the first question is that for many poor Chinese there still exists an association between being white and being wealthy. As a white Westerner myself, I was once reminded of this fact while walking down a street in China with a black, Western friend, when an elderly lady directed her request for money solely at me. My friend asked her with mock indignation why she hadn't approached him, and she confidently replied while pointing at me 'because he is richer'.

    Another more subtle aspect influencing begging behaviour, especially in more rural areas, is the philanthropic legacy left by late 19th and 20th century American and British missionaries who, in the course or cause of their conversion work, established many schools, health clinics and other free services. (For an excellent insight into the rights and wrongs of missionary work in China, check out Hilary Spurling's biography of Pearl Buck, 'Burying the Bones'). It's probably a combination of different cultural associations and assumptions, which leads to Western foreigners being targeted by China's under-privileged. And perhaps in truth, there's no definitive answer as the life circumstances that lead to someone ending up begging on the street in China are so variable.

    Indeed, this fact is reflected in the many different types of beggars that can be found on the streets of China. Very broadly speaking, and for the purposes of this article, they can be divided into four categories:

    1) Those in need of medical treatment

    It is fairly common to see beggars with open wounds requiring immediate medical attention. There are also large numbers with chronic illnesses or genetic deformities which have led to destitution. Often these individuals will have a brief written history of their condition displayed in front of where they sit, sometimes including medical receipts for treatment received so far. China does not have a fully funded public health system and so considering the severity of some of the medical conditions you often see, it is probable they really are unable to afford treatment.

    2) The elderly

    Elderly beggars are commonly weather beaten, arthritic Chinese villagers, no longer able to perform their agricultural work. In general, Chinese society has a much more cohesive and supportive family structure towards older generations than in the west, but of course cases exists where these family ties have broken down. Considering most elderly Chinese will have a traditional and conservative mindset, their willingness to suffer 'loss of face' by asking strangers for money makes it more likely than not that they are in genuine need.

    3) Children

    Child beggars often work in pairs and many seem to share the features of having a runny nose and dirty, over-sized clothes. You may also see children dressed in school uniform with written notes stating that their parents are unable to afford school tuition fees. If you have lived in China for even a small amount of time you are probably aware that China has documented cases of child beggars organised and exploited by adult gangs. If you pay attention it is often possible to see adult individuals directing children's begging activities on the streets.

    4) Street performers
    Street performers are often elderly musicians playing traditional Chinese instruments such as the erhu or pipa. There is a long history of street performers in China, one of the more recent famous examples being Abing (Hua Yanjun), who was a blind erhu player active in the first half of the 20th century.

    Deciding who or if to give money to someone on the street is obviously not a China specific dilemma but a personal moral choice applicable anywhere. It is not this article's intention to force an absolute answer as there isn't one! Burdened with complex cultural associations and the fact that whatever your employment or salary, as an expat you are probably earning above the average Chinese wage, you might feel morally compelled to give money to beggars.

    Or perhaps you want to contribute directly and immediately towards alleviating the pain of someone with an obvious medical problem. Maybe it's even that after a maddening ride on a crowded public transportation system after a day at work, it is easier for convenience’s sake to doll out a couple of Yuan to a child beggar in order to ward off their often quite insistent begging techniques.

    A greater bang for your buck

    All of these reasons for giving money are perfectly understandable. However, if you're serious about providing lasting benefit to those you see in need on the street, and you want to be certain your money is not encouraging exploitation, it is a better idea to donate to an organised charity operating in China. Even as far back as 2005, the Ministry of Civil Affairs announced there to be 280,000 NGOs operating in China. These take the form of government organised NGOs (GONGOs), foreign NGOs, or grass root Chinese NGOs, of which there are thousands catering to specific causes. If you do choose this route for giving, with a quick search on the internet it shouldn't be hard to find a charity working with the social group you'd like to help.

    Here are a few links that you may find useful:

    宝鸡新星流浪儿童援助中心 (street children charity established by Doctors Without Borders)
    China Development Brief | Reporting the latest news on China's social development (directory of international NGOs in China)
    企业社会责任机构指南 (China Association for NGO Cooperation)

    Charity in China: The Low Down on Street Begging– Expat Corner | eChinacities.com


    ******************************

    China should immediately send out letters rogatory for this most disgraceful slander of such a fine and fair nation that has no beggars like China!

    As I said before, China does not copy anyone, even for begging.

    They are the ones who are the Real McCoy for everything!
     
  10. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Re: Olympics: The difference between India and China is… family

    To use poor people to fulfil national aim would be exploitation.

    Exploitation of children, who are not mature enough to make their own decisions, is against human rights.

    Being poor does not mean the child will become beggars.

    In a Communist system every citizen is supposed to be looked after by the State so that they have the basic necessities and are not impoverished and definitely do not have to beg!

    Have you not noticed that even in a developed country like the UK, they are dead against the NHS being junked?

    If it is junked, the UK will be a nation of beggars because they will not be able to pay the huge medical bills.

    It is the least that citizens can expect - basic necessities. And if it is to paid for, it should be reasonable and within limits and not exploitative.

    Even Obama is trying to do it in the USA.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2012
    satish007 likes this.
  11. satish007

    satish007 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Olympics: The difference between India and China is… family

    you touch Chinese sore spot. good post, yes, CCP forget they should let Chinese common wealth.
     
  12. huaxia rox

    huaxia rox Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Olympics: The difference between India and China is… family

    its the families that choose to send their children to soprts trainning centers and how this is against human rights??

    to send your children on the streets to become beggars after digging out their eyeballs on purpose is more humanity and not against human rights??

    and your hindu children r mature enough to make their own decisions to beome hindus when they r very young???

    and your hindu system is supposed to send your children on the street??
     
  13. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Re: Olympics: The difference between India and China is… family

    You make a mistake and show your abject ignorance.

    India is not a Hindu State.

    Unlike China which has forced people through coercion etc to become Han and so the Han population in China is 93%, in India Hindus do not have such a huge percentage. And more so, they don't force people to covert to Hindus as the Hans have done in China. If Hindus did so, India would not be having the second/ third largest Muslim population in the world.

    Your post indicates that you also have no idea of China.

    But then I don't hold that against you, since your country does not allow media freedom to report the truth in its holity.

    But the situation is so bad in China that the Chinese Communist controlled media is forced to report in snatches.

    Here is an eye opener for you:

    *********************

    As China's Economy Grows, So does China's Child Labour Problem


    Child labour in China is hardly a new phenomenon. For years, despite official regulations banning the employment of minors (defined by Chinese law as those under sixteen years of age), teenagers and even pre-adolescents from poorer regions of China have been drawn to the rapidly developing southern and coastal areas looking for work. For this army of juvenile labourers, employment is readily available in the workshops and factories (and to a lesser extent related industries, such as food service) that are at the heart of China's economic boom. A recent People's Daily Report cites an investigation undertaken by the government agency in charge of monitoring labour conditions in Shandong province's Jinan City. According to the report, the use of juvenile labour is most prevalent in the following industries: Toy production, textiles, construction, food production, and light mechanical work. Concerning the latter, the report concludes that child labour is particularly in demand because children have smaller hands and eyesight undamaged by years of labour, making them more desirable than adults for certain kinds of work.

    More often than not, parents of juvenile workers have little choice but to send their children off to work; as school fees increase beyond the means of most rural families, educational opportunities for rural children grow increasingly dim. Further, the earnings of children, however meager, represent a substantial portion of much-needed income to poor families. Parents of juvenile labourers rarely have a clear idea of the adverse working conditions and physical risks inherent in industrial work. Moreover, the juvenile workers learn themselves are often reluctant to complain, knowing well the critical nature of their financial contributions to the family.

    Underage labourers are particularly vulnerable to job related hazards resulting in injury and death, and this is because they tend to be less aware of workplace hazards than do adult workers. An adult working in a coal miner is generally aware of perilous conditions in which they work; a child working in a factory, on the other hand, is usually less aware of the dangers they face, making their situation all the more hazardous. Furthermore, while adult and juvenile labourers both shoulder similar burdens of financial contribution to the family, the workplace injury or death of a minor brings an even greater degree of bereavement and psychological damage to loved ones.

    A report issued by Human Rights in China (Human Rights in China 中国人权 | HRIC) in March of this year documented the tragic case of five adolescent girls who appeared to have been poisoned by carbon monoxide smoke from a coal brazier lit in the confines of their cramped factory sleeping quarters. In an attempt to hide culpability for the girl's deaths, the panicked factory manager ordered that the bodies be disposed of immediately; later investigation revealed that two of the girls had likely been buried alive. Even among a Chinese public increasingly used to news of workplace tragedy, the egregiously grim nature of this case sparked outrage and gained widespread media coverage throughout China and abroad.

    For better or worse, this case and others like it continue to shed light on the increasing problem of child labour and the adverse working conditions faced by child workers in China. Even the People's Daily, once reticent to cover potentially sensitive issues, has written extensively on the issue of child labour (1).

    Few parents understand the dangers of allowing their children to enter the workforce. This low awareness in the public about child safety and protection provides a breeding ground for both exploitation and potential disaster. In late 2003, a reporter from Guangzhou's Southern Metropolis Newspaper did investigating child labour visited a local textile factory and found workers as young as twelve years old working as much as sixteen hours per day, more during peak production season. When the reporter asked to see the young worker's sleeping quarters, they replied that the cramped 200-square meter workshop was it, and that at night they slept on or under their worktables. (2) Far from being an anomaly, the reporter found similar conditions in other nearby factories. Surveying various sites around the industrial area, the reporter wrote that the area was filled with heaps of leftover textile scraps mixed with trash, presenting a great fire hazard. The reporter felt that the entire area was "ripe for catastrophe."

    Another article published in the same paper on August 11th, 2004 concerned a primary school headmaster in Guangdong province's Huizhuo city. This headmaster was found employing students from his school in a private toy factory which he owned (3). According to the report, local labour and commercial officials found thirty-five juveniles between the ages of eight and sixteen working in the "headmaster's" factory. When informed of the illegality of his actions, the headmaster seemed surprised, and claimed to merely be offering the students an opportunity to earn money. As for the physical risk that factory work posed to his students, the headmaster said that he "would sooner risk his own life than that of one of the students."

    We have to ask ourselves how the general public can hope to be made aware of the dangers of child labour when someone like a school headmaster, clearly responsible for the protection and education of children, could be so oblivious. Unfortunately, the issue is more complex, as one of the factors leading to the rise in child labour in China is the corresponding rise in school fees. While it's natural to see this headmaster as unscrupulously using his position for personal profit, it is also possible that rising costs and a virtual cessation of academic subsidies from the government made the operation of a small, privately owned factory seem to him a logical way of helping his students to continue their educations. Without further information, it is impossible to know for sure, but taking into account the dismantling of China's once-free socialist education system, either case is a possibility.

    As various sources within the Chinese media have pointed out, documenting occupational health and safety problems among child labourers is inherently difficult because Chinese labour law bans child labour. One newly passed regulation makes the hiring of a minor punishable by a fine of 5000 Yuan per worker (cumulative per month of employ) and suspension of the employer's operating license. Other laws criminalize the placing of underage workers in potentially hazardous situations and forced bonding of a child for the purpose of labour (3). The problem lies not so much with regulation but lack of enforcement. Indeed, despite stiffer penalties, the problem of child labour has only become more serious in recent years. A growing economy coupled with a growing economic disparity provides a fertile ground for exploitation of societies most vulnerable members. Local governments, in a headlong rush to woo manufacturers into their districts are often reticent to enforce regulations against child labour, which might act as an impediment to local economic growth.

    The problem of juvenile labour in China is far too multifaceted to be summarized in black and white terms. To address these complexities, we suggest that further and deeper studies into the root causes of the problem be carried out. We see these root causes as being a growing economic disparity in China, a rapidly changing social structure, and a failure of the Chinese educational system to provide adequate and affordable education to all children. Until these issues are addressed, it is our belief that the problem of child labour in China will continue to grow, and as it does incidents involving the injury and death of juvenile workers will continue. (4)

    People's Daily, December 20, 2002 "Concern over phenomenon of Child labor and child victims of economic kidnapping"

    Southern Metropolis News, October 21, 2003 "Sleeping under the working table" Textile factory hiring child labor.

    Southern Metropolis News, August 11, 2004 "Primary School headmaster hires own students as child labor" the education department considers suspending headmaster
    Linked at http://www.molss.gov.cn/correlate/gl9181.htm(Chinese Only).
    As China's Economy Grows, So does China's Child Labour Problem | China Labour Bulletin
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2012
  14. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Re: Olympics: The difference between India and China is… family

    I don't blame the Chinese Govt for all this.

    To the Chinese MONEY is GOD.

    And EXPLOITATION is the BIRTHRIGHT of all Chinese!
     
  15. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Child Slave Labor in China
    by Megan Grau



    The International Labor Organization (ILO) has estimated that of the 250 million children between the ages of five and fourteen work in developing countries, 61 percent are in Asia. Although we live in an extremely modern age, there is, in fact, child slave labor present in China. Some of these children work in sweatshops. A sweatshop is a workplace where workers are subjected to extreme exploitation, including the lack of a living wages or benefits, poor and dangerous working conditions, and harsh and unnecessary discipline, such as verbal and physical abuse. Sweatshop workers are paid less than their daily expenses, thus they are never able to save any money to invest in their futures. They are trapped in a never-ending cycle (Embar, pars. 2-5).

    The exact number of child labors working in China is still unknown. China's repressive political system does not allow this information acquired directly from China, there are no Chinese non-governmental organizations (NGOs) active in this area, and foreign NGOs do not have access. Therefore, it is impossible to judge how strictly the Chinese Government enforces child labor laws or to determine the efforts of non-governmental organizations to address child labor in China (China, par.1).

    Most China-watchers conclude that child labor is increasing, particularly in areas around Hong Kong. This deduction is based on a high dropout rate from school and the hasty expansion of foreign investment in export-oriented enterprises. There is indeed increasing evidence that school children are part of the required workforce. Also, an official from the Chinese Ministry of Labor confessed that the employment of children was extremely serious in China. Although no specific Chinese industry is identifiable as a significant violator of child labor regulations, they involve a range of export industries including garments and textiles, fireworks, and toys (China, pars. 2-3).

    The Chinese Ministry of Labor admitted that the child labor situation was very serious throughout the country. It stated that exploiting child laborers has become a common occurrence. In some coastal areas and particular economic zones, such as Fujian and Guangdong, as well as Zhejiang, Sichuan, and Hubei, there are reported to be approximately four to five million-child laborers under the age of 16. Child laborers under 12 years of age are also found in Whenzhou and in some areas of Guangdong and Hainan. The children usually work 10 to 14 hours a day with half the wages of an adult.

    Much of the proof that child labor exists in China is taken from data from the large economic zone of Shenzhen. Children between the ages of 10 to 16 are working up to 14 hours a day in factories in Shenzhen. It was also recorded that girls work in awful conditions for 13 to 14 hours a day from 7 a.m.- 10 p.m. with two one-hour breaks. The China Youth News said that 44 of the 206 foreign-owned companies or joint ventures in Shenzhen employ children less than 16 years of age (China, pars. 4-5).

    The United States imports of pyrotechnics and explosives from China is approaching $1 billion. Children are working in the fireworks industry. A recent report described an explosion at a fireworks factory in Hebei that killed one child and injured 34 schoolgirls ranging from 11 to 13 years of age. Investigators found that the school children had been forced by their teachers to work for slave wages making firecrackers. The children were promised 20 fen, 2 cents, for making one long braid of firecrackers, but in reality were paid three fen, 0.3 cents. In March 2001, 42 people, most of them third and fourth-graders, were killed in an explosion at a school. The school blow up because the Chinese use young students to make fireworks in order to keep the price lower than their competitors. The younger students are required to assemble at least 1,000 fireworks a day while the older children, fifth-graders, are required to make ten times that many (Farah).

    Newspaper and journal reports indicate that children are also working in the garment and textile industries of China. Imports of apparel and textiles from China to the U.S. market are reaching beyond $4.5 billion each year. It was reported that China's number one textile firm at Qingpu employs children aged 12 to 15 years old that recruited were from the neighboring province of Anhui. In Chungsan City, a foreign textile enterprise employed about 160 child laborers and a 14 year old was killed after her hair became tangled in her machine. Journalists also found 12 year-old children sleeping two to three in a bed in dorms and working 15 hours a day for $10 per month (Lindsay).

    The International Child Labor Study staff also received numerous claims of the use of child labor in toy, sporting equipment, and game factories. The United States imports approximately $4 billion worth of toys, games, and sporting goods from China every year. A Business Week article reported that, in order to meet the holiday demand for toys, girls at a plant were ordered to work one or two 24-hour shifts each month. The average North American toy maker earns $11 an hour. In China, toy workers earn an average of 30 cents an hour.

    The enforcement of child labor laws is sometimes made difficult by counterfeit identification cards. Southeastern China workers reported the use of counterfeit IDs is fairly common. Some workers admitted that they were three or four years younger than the 16 years certified on their ID cards.

    The International Labor Organization reports that compulsory education in China is required up to age 16, yet children are reported to be dropping out of school at increasing rates. According to the U.S. State Department, Chinese press reports indicate that dropout rates for lower secondary schools (ages 12 to 15) exceed nine percent in several southern provinces, whereas the national average is 2.2 percent. An increasing group of children leaving school below the legal work age suggests the possibility of a growing child labor problem (China, pars. 10-12).

    Slave labor exists in our world today. It is not some far off problem that the people of America can do nothing about. Americans must education themselves on the issue and learn how to make a difference. These children are in need of help.

    IHS Child Slave Labor News :: Child Slave Labor in China
     
  16. huaxia rox

    huaxia rox Senior Member Senior Member

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    vocie from india.....good to hear..........try typing 'india child slavery' in google and u get this....

    Google

    try some other key words...u get some others....

    no time to post them though.....i only wanna know....r indians trying to suggest prc to learn india in this field to become a shinning prc???
     
  17. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    The point to note is, unlike you Chinese, who pretend that China has no problems, we do not run away from reality and daydream like you all!

    IIRC Did you not say that begging is not in China till it was ripped apart?
     
  18. huaxia rox

    huaxia rox Senior Member Senior Member

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    once liar always liar.....even in the US there r some begging........

    tell me when and where did i say 'that begging is not in China '???which post which line??? mr liar....
     
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  19. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Here it is.

    Typical Chinese style.

    As if you have some and we have the whole nation!

    And you don't have deformed child beggars.

    Read what common Chinese talk of begging in China

    Beggars in China and People’s Attitude | Wangjianshuo's Blog

    Someone's pants should now be on fire!
     
  20. huaxia rox

    huaxia rox Senior Member Senior Member

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    dont dodge my question mr liar....

    tell me when and where did i say 'that begging is not in China '???which post which line???
     
  21. huaxia rox

    huaxia rox Senior Member Senior Member

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    whats indian style??

    india has beggars...prc has beggars...so the two have same amounts of beggars?

    indians r poor....chinese r poor.....so personal incomes r same??equally poor??

    u dont need to tell which 1 is poorer??? u dont need to tell which 1 has more beggars?
     
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