Ex-Indian Army officer wanted in 1996 murder kills himself and family in California

Discussion in 'Internal Security' started by ejazr, Jun 10, 2012.

  1. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Ex-Indian Army officer wanted in 1996 murder kills himself and family in California, authorities say | Fox News

    A former Indian Army officer wanted in a 1996 killing in his native country killed his wife and two of their children in their California home Saturday before apparently taking his own life, authorities said.

    Avtar Singh called Selma police at around 6:15 a.m. and told them that he had just killed four people, Fresno County Sheriff's Deputy Chris Curtice said.

    Selma police asked for assistance from the Fresno County Sheriff's Office because Singh was known to have a military background and was wanted by authorities in India for allegedly killing a human rights lawyer in 1996 in the disputed Kashmir region, Curtice said.

    When a sheriff's SWAT team entered the home they found the bodies of Singh, a woman believed to be his wife and two children, ages 3 and 15, Curtice said. All four appeared to have died from gunshot wounds.

    A 17-year-old boy also found in the home was suffering from severe head trauma and was "barely alive," Curtice said. The teen was taken to a hospital where he underwent surgery. His condition wasn't known.

    Singh fled to the United States after he was accused of killing lawyer Jaleel Andrabi in Indian-controlled Kashmir's main city, Srinagar.

    Andrabi disappeared in March 1996 at the height of an anti-India uprising, and his body was recovered 19 days later in a local river. He had been shot in the head and his eyes gouged out.

    Singh, 47, was arrested by Selma police in February 2011 when his wife reported that he had choked her, Selma Police Chief Myron Dyck said shortly after that arrest. After Singh was taken into custody, police discovered that he was being sought in India.

    Several days later, India requested that the United States arrest and extradite Singh. It wasn't clear on Saturday why Singh had remained free since the request.

    Dyck didn't immediately return a call seeking comment Saturday about the 2011 arrest, and Selma police referred questions about Saturday's incident to Fresno County sheriff's officials.

    Selma police last had contact with Singh about two months ago when he called to complain that reporters wouldn't leave him alone because of the murder warrant, Fresno County Sheriff Margaret Mims told the Fresno Bee (Sheriff: Selma man kills wife, sons before killing self - Updates - fresnobee.com ).

    Singh owned and operated Jay Truck Lines, a trucking company in Selma. Alli Adan, a driver for the company, said he spent time with Singh this past week, including Friday night, and Singh acted normally.

    "He was a nice guy," Adan told the newspaper. "I couldn't believe it because I didn't think he could do something like this."
     
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  3. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Re: Ex-Indian Army officer wanted in 1996 murder kills himself and family in Californ

    For those who don't know the case, this is about Jaleel Andrabi who case was investigated and the army officer indicted. There was an extradition request pending with the US which they refused to honour. Similar to like the case with David Headley or Rana in the Mumbai case.

    Something to note is the unfavorable response by the US in extradition requests from India and this is not the only case.
     
  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Re: Ex-Indian Army officer wanted in 1996 murder kills himself and family in Californ

    Avtar Singh is a very common Sikh name.

    I wonder which Avatar this is.
     
  5. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    Re: Ex-Indian Army officer wanted in 1996 murder kills himself and family in Californ

    Extradition treaty between India and the US
     
  6. Zoravar

    Zoravar Regular Member

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    Re: Ex-Indian Army officer wanted in 1996 murder kills himself and family in Californ

    An article was published on this issue months back(I even posted it on DFI).They let him escape to USA because he threatened to blow the lid off these killings as he claimed that he did not act alone.The judge hearing the matter was transferred ,presumably to protect Maj. Avtar Singh.
    Ps.Found the post and here's a link to the article which was published a few months back.

    http://www.openthemagazine.com/article/nation/the-man-who-knows-too-much

    Here's a link to an article posted after the suicide.

    http://www.tehelka.com/story_main53.asp?filename=Ws110612JAMMU.asp
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2012
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  7. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Re: Ex-Indian Army officer wanted in 1996 murder kills himself and family in Californ

    The Hindu : Opinion / Editorial : The truth must still be told

    “Iwill open my mouth,” Major Avtar Singh had told the journalist, Hartosh Singh Bal, last year. “I will not keep quiet.'' This weekend, Singh, facing extradition proceedings for his alleged role in the brutal 1996 murder of Kashmiri human rights activist and lawyer Jalil Andrabi, shot himself, his wife, and their two young children, at their home in Selma, California. In weeks to come, theories about what led Singh to engage in his savage act will likely proliferate. There is only one fact, though, that we can be certain of: no one will ever now know what he might have told a judge about the murder of Andrabi. The basic facts about the Andrabi case, though, are well known. In 1996, Jammu and Kashmir Police investigators established during a High Court-mandated inquiry that Andrabi was kidnapped from his home by a unit of former terrorists working with the Indian Army. The lawyer had been involved in documenting instances of human rights abuses by the security forces. Days later, his mutilated body was found floating in the Jhelum. The five men alleged to have killed Andrabi also turned up dead days later. From the custodial testimony of Muhammad Ashraf Khan, part of the covert unit working with Major Singh, police learned that the officer had executed Mr. Andrabi. For his part, Singh sought to discredit Mr. Khan's testimony, saying it was implausible that he would have made a murder confession to a man who was not his friend.

    Even if Singh will now never be brought to trial, there are questions the Indian government needs to answer about the Andrabi case. Major Ashok ‘Bulbul' Clifton, Singh's superior at the time of the murder, has never been formally questioned. It has also never been explained how Major Singh succeeded in leaving the country, and why the government repeatedly stalled judicial efforts to locate him. These questions, among others, are important not just in and of themselves, but also because of what they mean for the future of Jammu and Kashmir. Last year, former Orissa High Court Chief Justice Bilal Nazki, who had earlier ordered the investigation into Andrabi's death, said the case symbolised “what is wrong with Delhi's approach to Kashmir.” “There is demand for a solution to Kashmir outside the ambit of the Constitution,” Justice Nazki said, “but if the government gives people all the rights enshrined in the Constitution and puts in place effective systems, this place will change.” He is right. For many, this appeal might seem utopian — but making sure the truth about Jalil Andrabi's murder doesn't die with the killings in Selma will be a small step in that direction.
     

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