Encounter killings by police

Discussion in 'Internal Security' started by parijataka, Jun 11, 2013.

  1. parijataka

    parijataka Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2011
    Messages:
    4,893
    Likes Received:
    3,688
    Location:
    Bengaluru
    While the most splashed around cases in media are that of Ishrat Jahan, an alleged LeT operative, and Sohrabuddin Sheikh, the top states for so-called `encounter killings` are in fact Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Maharashtra, Delhi, Andhra Pradesh and Uttaranchal. During the period 2002-2007 the National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) recorded 440 out of which only 4 were in Gujarat.

    According to the National Human Rights Commission of India, there were 440 cases of alleged fake encounters in the country during 2002-2007. Most of these happened in the states of Uttar Pradesh (231), Rajasthan (33), Maharashtra (31), Delhi (26), Andhra Pradesh (22) and Uttaranchal (19).

    From 2008-09 to June 2011, NHRC recorded 369 cases of alleged fake encounters. By June 2011, NHRC had resolved 98 of these cases, while the rest were pending settlement. The states with high number of cases were Uttar Pradesh (111), Manipur (60), West Bengal (23), Tamil Nadu (15) and Madhya Pradesh (15).

    Mumbai during the 90's was so wracked with criminal gangs that the Mumbai Police created a group of policemen who came to be known as` `Encounter Specialists`. Movies have been made on some famous encounters as well.

    Excerpts from wiki page on encounter killings -

    Mumbai

    Police encounter killings were common in Mumbai, India, from the 1990s through the mid-2000s. Some of the police officers involved came to be known as "Encounter Specialists". The Mumbai police resorted to encounter killings as they believed that this practice delivered speedy justice when the courts were overloaded with cases. They used encounter killings to severely cripple the underworld in Mumbai and broke down the extortion racket, which was rampant at that time. Human rights activists consider these encounter killings, together with torture by police of prisoners in lock-ups, and custodial deaths of prisoners to be gross human rights violations.

    Though highly controversial from an official point of view, the police authorities have done little to restrain such activities. This is attributed to the common understanding that the police primarily carry out staged encounters to kill persons suspected of being dangerous criminals, whom the Indian Police Service have been unable to prosecute legally (due to lack of evidence or powerful political connections among the criminals).

    On January 11, 1982, the gangster Manya Surve was shot dead by police officers Raja Tambat and Isaque Bagwan at the Wadala area. This has been identified as the city's first recognized encounter killing.It was believed to end urban piracy by dacoits. From that period until early 2003, the police killed 1200 criminals.

    The former Police Inspector of Mumbai, Pradeep Sharma, who is known to have killed 113 alleged gangsters and dacoits, once said, "Criminals are filth and I'm the cleaner". He was fired in August 2008 for extortion of money from the underworld. He was cleared of all charges and reinstated in May 2009.

    Well-known encounter specialists (with encounter killing count) of Mumbai Police include:

    Police Inspector Pradeep Sharma: 104
    Sub-Inspector Daya Nayak: 82
    Inspector Praful Bhosale: 77
    Police Inspector Ravindra Angre: 51
    Assistant Inspector of Police Sachin Hindurao Waze: 63
    Police Inspector Vijay Salaskar (killed in November 2008 Mumbai attacks): 75–80

    Punjab

    The term "police encounter" was often used during the Punjab insurgency between 1984 and 1995. During this time, Punjab police officials reported “encounters” to local newspapers and to the family members of those killed. The victim was typically a person whom the police believed to be a militant or involved in the militant separatist movement; proof of alleged militant involvement was rarely given. Such encounters have also been referred to as “staged encounters” or “fake encounters,” as these deaths were often believed to be the result of torture or outright execution. Ultimately, the practice became so common that “encounter” became synonymous with extrajudicial execution.The Punjab police specifically targeted the families of suspected militants in encounter killings to punish them.

    Gujarat

    After the communal riots of 2002 in Gujarat, police committed several encounter deaths in the city. Some of these were attributed to militant attempts to assassinate the state's chief minister Narendra Modi in retaliation for the alleged involvement of the state machinery in the riots.

    According to the NHRC figures, during 2002-2007, there were 4 alleged fake encounters in Gujarat (out of 440 in all of India).Two of these encounters, both led by DIG DG Vanjara of Ahmedabad Police, were confirmed as fake by the Indian authorities.

    They received considerable media attention:

    Ishrat Jahan encounter case (2004)
    Sohrabuddin Sheikh fake encounter (2005)

    Other notable cases

    Veerappan, the notorious forest brigand, was reportedly killed by the Special Task Force (STF) in an encounter on 18 October 2004. Some human rights outfits claimed that the circumstantial evidence indicated that he was killed in a fake encounter after being tortured by the police.[19]

    In 19 September 2008, Delhi-police inspector Mohan Chand Sharma, a decorated officer, and two suspects were killed in the Batla House encounter case in New Delhi. The encounter led to the arrest of two suspected Indian Mujahideen (IM) terrorists, while a third managed to escape. The Shahi Imam of the Jama Masjid termed the encounter as "totally fake", and accused the Government of harassing Muslims. Several political parties and activists demanded a probe into the allegations that the encounter was fake. After an investigation, the National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) cleared the police of any violations of rights.

    In popular culture

    Police encounters have been subjects of a number of Indian films. These include:

    Ab Tak Chhappan (2004) starring Nana Patekar
    Encounter: The Killing (2003) starring Naseeruddin Shah
    Kaagar
    Kaakha Kaakha, a Tamil film starring Surya
    Khakee (2003), starring Amitabh Bachchan and Ajay Devgan
    Risk
    Shootout at Lokhandwala
    Shootout at Wadala

    Vikram Chandra's novel Sacred Games is based on the police force in Mumbai, It includes dramatic scenes of police encounters.
     
  2.  
  3. Keshav Murali

    Keshav Murali Back to studies :( Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2013
    Messages:
    1,229
    Likes Received:
    688
    Location:
    The city of Humidity
    @parijataka, they seem to have slightly ignored TN which IMO is the worst in these 'encounter' killings in which they let the prisoner run in the forests on the border and then hunt him down like rats.

    We hear rumours (not me) almost everyday that the new criminal who was taken down was killed in a fake encounter since TN police doesn't trust Madras HC.

    It's not like TN police is the best of the worst :lol:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  4. JBH22

    JBH22 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2010
    Messages:
    3,620
    Likes Received:
    2,390
    I heard that andra pradesh police are more violent in their reprisal action.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  5. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    824
    Location:
    Forget It....Trace my IP if you can
    How can anyone ignore UP Police ?
     
  6. parijataka

    parijataka Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2011
    Messages:
    4,893
    Likes Received:
    3,688
    Location:
    Bengaluru
    Actually, the way our (paid) media and Congress Bureau of Investigation is behaving as if Gujarat is the worst state for encounters - in fact NHRC figures themselves state that 2002-2007 Guj had just 4 out of 440 cases.

    As for TN, you guys r far behind Uttar Pradesh... :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015

Share This Page