EMP-the blackout bomb

Discussion in 'Strategic Forces' started by LETHALFORCE, Sep 18, 2010.

  1. agentperry

    agentperry Senior Member Senior Member

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    now wars will be decisive and short. with more no of pow and future chances (to us) to humiliate..........( rest left as homework)
     
  2. Galaxy

    Galaxy Elite Member Elite Member

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    DRDO has so many projects in hand. It would be better if they complete pending one 1st.
     
  3. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    DRDO has lot of labs and manpower
    go though this website DRDO

    you can find name of labs and their work on too right of the website.
     
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  4. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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  5. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Introducing the Electromagnetic Bazooka - Technology Review

    Introducing the Electromagnetic Bazooka



    A technique borrowed from acoustics could lead to a super-powerful amplifier of microwave radiation.

    CHRISTOPHER MIMS 06/07/2010

    Non-nuclear electromagnetic pulses (EMPs), featured in movies like Goldeneye and The Matrix, are the stuff of electrical engineers' nightmares. Imagine a conventional explosive that sends out a shockwave of electromagnetic radiation so powerful that it short circuits computers, stops cars dead in their tracks, and causes airplanes to drop out of the sky. Such devices might also have more prosaic uses: for example, two Texas congressman just proposed using EMPs to stop smugglers at the U.S.-Mexico border.

    Previously, it was thought that creating an EMP of sufficient power to disable vehicles or infrastructure would require, at the least, a conventional chemical explosion. Work funded by the French Ministry of Defense, published earlier this year, describes an early prototype of an all-electric version of what the researchers describe as a potential "electromagnetic bazooka."


    The device borrows a technique invented in 2004 for audio signal processing by French physicist Mathias Fink, known as Time Reversal Signal Processing. The technique uses a Time Reversal Mirror to receive a short pulse of electromagnetic energy at an antenna and then shoot back toward the initial transmitter the same signal, but with its wave-form reversed in time. The technique is enabled by the use of an Arbitrary Waveform Generator, which can generate any waveform you like, including a backwards version of the waveform an antenna just received. It's a bit like responding to a given signal by playing the same signal backward, although it happens in milliseconds.

    When used on either audio signals or electromagnetic waves, a Time Reversal Mirror allows engineers to exploit what's known as the "pulse compression property" of time reversal to create an amplified version of the signal at a point outside the reverberation chamber housing the transmitter and the time reversal mirror. Therefore, at some distance from the device, a significantly amplified version of the initial signal is generated.

    Using this setup, the researchers discovered a linear relationship between the number of antennas (from one to eight) used in their time reversal mirror and the resulting amplitude of the microwave pulse they generated.

    Further amplification of the signal before retransmission by the mirror, using a technique called "one-bit time reversal," allowed the team to achieve 46 dB of amplification. Because decibels are represented on a logarithmic scale, that corresponds to amplification of the original signal by a factor of more than 10,000.

    It's clear that this work is early-stage because the paper did not make explicit the power requirements of the device or the destructive capacity of the resulting amplified electromagnetic signal, if any. However, as our infrastructure and our military becomes ever more dependent on microchips and electronics in general, any developments in the ease with which an EMP can be developed should be of considerable interest to military and security professionals, or even, if this device is as straightforward as it appears to be, enterprising attendees of next year's Maker Faire.
     
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  6. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Researchers developing portable E-Bomb

    Researchers developing portable E-Bomb


    [​IMG]

    April 23, 2009 High-power microwave (HPM) bombs that use an enormous electromagnetic radio pulse to disable computers, electronics, vehicles, guided missiles and communications while leaving people and structures unharmed have been under investigation in research labs for a number of years. Until recently these weapons have been impractically large at over 3.5 meters long, but researchers at Texas Tech University have now built a self powered device with U.S. Army funding that measures 15 cm in diameter and only 1.5 meters long, making it small enough to be considered portable.

    The device being tested at an arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama should produce a peak power of 35 MW with a pulse length of 100 to 150 nanoseconds, emitting a microwave beam in the 2- to 6-GHz range.

    You may be wondering how so much energy can be generated with such a small portable device. Firstly it is due to the apparent power generated by compressing a lot of energy into a very short period of time. Where electrical power is normally measured in kilowatt hours on your utility bill, the peak pulse of this E-bomb lasts just 36 billionths of an hour. Secondly, an E-Bomb is a device that can convert the output of high explosives into radio waves. The 1.5 meter long Texas Tech HPM contains three main components: a power generator in the form of a flux compression generator (FCG), a microwave source called a vircator (for virtual cathode oscillator), and an antenna that radiates the resultant high-power microwave radiation.

    The source of all this power is the Flux Compression Generator (FCG). In an FCG, the energy is primarily stored as chemical energy in an explosive like plastic C4. It consists of a metal pipe with a helical stator coil wound inside it like a solenoid and a second smaller diameter armature tube which contains the C4 explosive, with an insulating layer between the two in a coaxial arrangement. The process is started with a 12-volt lead acid battery one end of the coil which provides a field current. Once detonated the explosive front propagates through the explosive in the armature pressing the inner pipe against the outer, rapidly compressing the magnetic field and generating a pulse of electromagnetic energy. An FCG is a one use device as it is destroyed by the explosive and although they are relatively cheap, they become less efficient as they get smaller.

    In the second part of the process, the FCG’s energy pulse is fed through an inductor producing a voltage of about 100 kilovolts. This voltage powers the vircator, which converts the energy into microwaves. The same vircator can also be driven by power sources other than a FCG such as explosive or propellant driven Magneto-Hydrodynamic (MHD) generators or by a nonexplosive power generator that don't self-destruct such as a Marx generator, although these tend to be much larger than a simple FCG.

    Texas Tech is working on a Marx generator in the hopes of making a portable directed energy weapon called a microwave cannon. The first application may be to stop vehicles by using a HPM to destroy the electronics and shut the engine down.

    The amount of damage an E-bomb can do depends on its ability to couple the energy into the target. There are several ways for the microwave power to enter a system. Front door coupling happens when the pulse weapon couples with an antenna associated with radar or communications equipment. Back door coupling occurs through fixed electrical wiring and cables that connect equipment like mains power or telephone wires. Lower frequencies work better on standing wiring while higher frequencies can work better through antennas. In both cases a high voltage standing wave enters the equipment and these spikes cause damage to electric power supplies and electronic components. For example a typical semiconductor such as a microprocessor is designed to operate at 3.3 – 5 volts. A large voltage spike can do extensive damage often requiring the replacement of most semiconductors in the equipment.

    Lab testing on the portable HPM has begun, but the technology is not expected to reach the field any time soon.
     
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  7. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    That must be Redstone Arsenal.

    (Note the consent you must give before accessing the site.)

    DoD Consent Banner
     
  8. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    We can, and will, use EMP bomb, says South Korea | Information, Gadgets, Mobile Phones News & Reviews | News.com.au

    We can, and will, use EMP bomb, says South Korea

    That seems to be the signal coming from South Korea after a GPS jamming attack on Friday that hit north-western parts of the country.
    South Korea laid the blame for the attack on North Korea, but Defense Acquisition Program Administration Kwon O-bong claimed its military was immune, because it had "a special code".
    However, he admitted there were "some weapons" that didn't carry the code and that it was looking to proof such weapons against further attacks.
    Wired reported that the attacks were aimed at disrupting military drills between South Korea and the US.
    The attacks were relatively harmless, affecting mainly mobile phones, but Wired claims such jamming attacks had the potential to cut the ability of bombs to guide themselves to targets and cause them to drop out of the sky.
    Despite the relatively harmless nature of the attack, South Korea certainly wasn't taking it lightly.
    In response, its Agency for Defense Development strongly hinted it can - and will - return fire with an electromagnetic pulse weapon if required, according to The Chosunilbo.
    When asked by Grand National Party lawmaker Kim Hak-song to "brief the Defense Committee on the progress of EMP development", an ADD spokesman replied: "We feel we can make use of it in wartime if the military makes such request."
    News of EMP attacks has increased of late, on the heels of a documentary called Iranium, which discusses the possibility and fallout of Iran detonating a nuclear device 400km above the USA.
    Last month, Russia all but accused the US of crippling one of its satellite launches with an EMP weapon.
    For it's part, South Korea admitted back in 2009 that it had begun work on an EMP weapon, but said it wouldn't be ready until 2014.
    "We've already developed the technology to create EMPs capable of neutralising targets within a 100m radius,'' an ADD official told The Korea Times at the time.
    "The development of an EMP bomb with a range of 1km will be finished by that time."


    Read more: We can, and will, use EMP bomb, says South Korea | Information, Gadgets, Mobile Phones News & Reviews | News.com.au
     
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  9. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    India Blackouts Are a Reminder of the EMP Threat

    India Blackouts Are a Reminder of the EMP Threat


    The recent blackouts in India offer many lessons for the United States regarding the threat of an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack.
    The power failures plunged more than 600 million people into darkness, making it the world’s largest power failure event and affecting more than twice the total population of the United States. They caused widespread disruption, including the stranding of workers in underground mines, the disruption of medical care, and massive disruption to citizens’ commutes. They also marked a large political liability for the Indian government.
    However, each of the two blackouts lasted for no longer than a single day. The effects of an EMP attack, on the other hand, would be permanent in almost all cases—given that the waves of particles are likely to completely destroy the electronic components they reach.
    An EMP is “a high-intensity burst of electromagnetic energy caused by the rapid acceleration of charged particles.” An EMP can be generated artificially through the detonation of a nuclear device at certain altitudes.
    The extent of the damage from the particle blast would depend on the altitude of the detonation and the size of the nuclear device. The disruption witnessed in India serves as only a hint of the devastation that would be wrought by an EMP attack.
    The task of considering the effects of an EMP attack in the current modern age—with its dependency on technology and need for reliable sources of energy—is no longer confined to the world of academic speculation. In addition to the disruption in India, massive blackouts in America’s past serve as important warnings about the dangers of an EMP.
    The deployment of a robust missile defense system—comprised primarily of Aegis ballistic missile defense capable ships, Aegis Ashore (a land-based missile defense component), and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle capabilities—represents the best strategy for addressing the EMP threat caused by a nuclear or an EMP device detonated at a high altitude. In preparation for a possible EMP strike, the U.S. should pursue efforts to enhance the resiliency of critical infrastructure and the electrical grid, reinforce disaster response plans, and develop plans for ways to communicate following an attack.
    As a matter of national security, the U.S. should sufficiently prepare and do so as soon as possible.
    Bryan DeWinter is currently a member of the Young Leaders Program at The Heritage Foundation. For more information on interning at Heritage, please visit: The Heritage Foundation Internship Program
     
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  10. Dixit13

    Dixit13 Regular Member

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    EMP weapons

    Do India have EMP weapons in its arsenal ??? OR plan to develop them?

    :confused:
     
  11. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Nuclear EMP: High-Altitude Blast

    Nuclear EMP: High-Altitude Blast

    We estimate the odds of any kind of EMP attack to be about as likely as a fire in your home. Terrorists and rogue nations would love to burn Western nations, but a nuclear EMP is difficult to create.

    Two Ingredients: Nuclear Bomb + Altitude
    A nuclear explosion always creates an EMP blast, but not all nuclear EMP blasts are the same. The EMP from a nuclear bomb below one kilometer stays in the area destroyed by the fireball and the pressure wave.

    To create a wide-area EMP, the bomb must detonate above about 25 km (15 miles). Attackers must get the nuclear weapon above the mid-stratosphere, where the explosion's gamma rays interact with the stratosphere and shoot a huge energy pulse downward.

    The pulse from a high-altitude blast can fry electronics and overload both the power grid and copper telephone lines.

    Altitude & Weapon Size Determine EMP Blast
    Once the weapon is beyond the critical mid-stratosphere, moving higher in the atmosphere increases the EMP blast zone. The larger range, however, needs a bigger bomb.

    To show the range of options, we've created a list of example EMP attacks and a "simulator" map.

    Building Big Bombs Is Difficult
    It takes a lot of work and resources to make megaton nuclear bombs. Pakistan is a good example. It detonated its first nuclear weapons in 1998. Pakistan now claims to have more than 100 warheads, but the maximum size tested is less than 36 kilotons.

    A regular 36-kiloton nuclear bomb would create a very significant EMP (see our simulator maps). That blast, however, would not destroy modern society. It would not blanket the entire United States and Canada. It would take a megaton or multi-megaton bomb to effectively generate that size blast from a single high-altitude blast. The less-stable nations still haven't reached the megaton club. Let's hope they never do.

    Better EMP Nukes & Super-EMP Bombs
    There is a worry, however that rogue nations might figure out how to build special nuclear bombs that are better at creating EMPs. Nuclear researchers have been working on these special-purpose bombs. Nuclear.

    The details are secret, but some general ideas are public.

    First, the nuclear designers would want to maximize the gamma rays that power the EMP. Designers could do this by changing the warhead's metals and the type of explosives that kick off the nuclear process. Builders could also target the nuclear reactions in ways that produce more gamma rays, probably at the expense of the total blast size. The bomb design might also focus gamma rays downward, reducing the gamma rays that escape into space.

    Second, designers could make an EMP more powerful by using a bomb that does not pre-ionize the stratosphere, or at least reducing the amount of pre-ionization. Ionization changes the atmosphere, making it absorbs part of the EMP pulse. Reducing pre-ionization would mean using a fusion weapon (atom bomb) instead of a thermonuclear weapon (hydrogen bomb) and/or making changes that reduce the x-rays and gamma rays from the bomb's first stage.

    Witnesses at congressional hearings seem to indicate the United States and Russia already have enhanced nuclear-EMP weapons. The other members of the big-five nuclear powers (China, France, UK) may also have "super EMPs."

    Smaller nuclear powers (India, Pakistan, North Korea, and Israel) are probably working to improve their nuclear-EMP effects, but any information is classified.

    "Several potential adversaries have the capability to attack the United States with a high altitude nuclear weapon-generated electromagnetic pulse, and others appear to be pursuing efforts to obtain that capability."

    Dr. William R. Graham, Ph.D., Chair, U.S. EMP Commission, Statement to House Armed Services Committee
     
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  12. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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  13. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    Should have done it yesterday.
     
  14. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    http://defensesystems.com/blogs/cyber-report/2012/12/emp-weapon.aspx

    EMP weapons now a reality
    An event took place October 2012 in the Utah desert that escaped the attention of most. Boeing successful tested an electro-magnetic pulse (EMP) device mounted within a missile. When I first reported on the early development of these weapons back in 2007 many scoffed and claimed all of this hype was pure fiction. Well it became a scientific fact.
    The code name give to the program was CHAMP, which stands for Counter-electronics High-power Microwave Advanced Missile Project. A video camera and wiring was shielded and remotely monitored by a room full of computers as the test took place. The video is impressive and I encourage you to watch it. Toward the end of the video the electronics of the camera appears to fails said to be due to the electronic waves penetrating through the unshielded lens.
    Here is a link to a Boeing video of a similar, successful test and demonstration of an EMP weapon’s capabilities: CHAMP - lights out (Video).
    Coverage of this latest, successful EMP test ran in the London Times and the piece made it clear that such an EMP weapon could cripple Iran by destroying its electronic systems. A targeted EMP attack would clearly impact the control system computers and programmable logic controllers used in Iran’s nuclear enrichment program.
    Like other cyber weapons, EMPs are weapons of mass disruption. Cyber weapons experts were quick to react to this latest development stating that it’s official, the U.S. Air Force has created and field-tested an EMP weapon. For some time now Iran and North Korea are known to have funded EMP research and development programs and their progress has been thought to be limited.
    One has to wonder if the news of this development will prompt other governments to accelerate their development efforts.
     
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  15. natarajan

    natarajan Senior Member Senior Member

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    stop joking even their site says
    The requested resource (/drdo/English/homebody.jspe) is not available

    Even the site is not properly maintained
     
  16. shom

    shom Regular Member

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    It is working really good dear,, perhaps u have just seen it and left the site ,,, u shud have checked the whole site,,,,,, dont blame ur own country unreasonably ,, if u think our websites dont work the only reason is us ,,,,, that is becoz our tech students dreamz to work in USA rather than working in India ,, their are very less patriot people left and rest are bought by other monetary powerful countries ,,, bloody bhikharis ,,,,:taunt1:
     
  17. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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  18. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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  19. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    From the article:

    The author presents no real evidence that Syria has such a weapon, only this quote from Assad:

    He takes that one quote, jumps to a conclusion, and runs with it for the rest of the article. His hysteria is not useful to the defense of Israel.
     
  20. Twinblade

    Twinblade Senior Member Senior Member

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    http://www.drdo.gov.in/drdo/whatsnew/ac-demo.pdf

    Bunker busters and research into EMP.
    A flux compression generator is the heart of EMP bomb :)
    [​IMG]

    Explosively pumped flux compression generator - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2014
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