EA-18G program

Discussion in 'Americas' started by SHASH2K2, Jun 2, 2010.

  1. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2010
    Messages:
    5,711
    Likes Received:
    723
    Location:
    Bihar, BanGalore , India
    Modern Electronics warfare systems

    [​IMG]

    The USA’s electronic attack fighters are a unique, overworked, and nearly obsolete capability. With the retirement of the US Air Force’s long-range EF-111 Raven “Spark ‘Vark,” the aging 4-seat EA-6B Prowlers are now the USA’s sole remaining tactical aircraft type for radar jamming, communications jamming and information operations like signals interception . Despite their age and performance limits, they’ve been predictably busy on the front lines, used for everything from escorting strike aircraft against heavily defended targets, to disrupting enemy IED land mine attacks by jamming all radio signals in an area.

    All airframes have lifespan limits, however, and the EA-6B is no exception. The USA’s new electronic warfare aircraft will be based on Boeing’s 2-seat F/A-18F Super Hornet multi-role fighter, and has 90% commonality with its counterpart. That will give it decent self-defense capabilities, as well as electronic attack potential. At present, however, the EA-18G is slated to be the only dedicated electronic warfare aircraft in the USA’s future force ? and since the USA is currently the only western country with such aircraft, it would become the sole source of tactical jamming support for NATO air forces as a whole.

    DID’s FOCUS articles offer in-depth, updated looks at significant military programs of record. This article describes the EA-18G aircraft and its key systems, outlining the program, and keeping track of ongoing developments, contracts, etc. that affect the program.
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2010
  2.  
  3. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2010
    Messages:
    5,711
    Likes Received:
    723
    Location:
    Bihar, BanGalore , India
  4. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2010
    Messages:
    5,711
    Likes Received:
    723
    Location:
    Bihar, BanGalore , India
    India has indigenously built electronic warfare system, which is being considered a leap towards self-reliance in the production of military equipment and hardware, reports the BBC.
    This is the most complicated and major system that has been indigenously developed by India. New Delhi has spent billions of rupees to build this system, which is very important for the Indian military.
    President APJ Abdul Kalam handed over the electronic warfare system to Army Chief General NC Vij at Defence Electronic Research Laboratories (DERL) in Hyderabad on Monday.
    The Army Chief said that the system is fully capable of detecting communication and radar signals, analysing and jamming these and destroying the communication as well as radar system of the enemy.
    On this occasion, the Indian President said that the country’s defence scientists and experts have accomplished this task and have proved that despite the developed countries efforts to deprive India of modern technology and equipment, they are fully capable of building such kind of electronic warfare system.
    Defence Minister George Fernandes said though peace at common borders with Pakistan and China is a matter of great pleasure for India, the country needs to keep vigilant and always remain ready to counter terrorism.
    According to BBC, the DERL with the assistance of military experts and several companies has built electronic warfare system in seven years. The entire system is fitted on 140 vehicles and can be quickly moved from one place to the other.
    Only 26 vehicles of this system have been handed over to the military and the entire system will be completed by the end of next year.
     
  5. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2010
    Messages:
    5,711
    Likes Received:
    723
    Location:
    Bihar, BanGalore , India
    NEW DELHI MAY 20. As part of a three-pronged counter-terrorism strategy in Jammu and Kashmir, India has started blocking infiltration routes favoured by militants, reviewing troop deployment along the Line of Control and installing an electronic warfare system to cut off communication between terrorists and their mentors across the border.

    The Army has recently begun placing barbed wire inside the Indian territory, parallel to the LoC, on certain stretches in the higher reaches known to be used by infiltrators. So far no opposition has been reported from the Pakistan Army.

    The International Border, 100 metres from the zero point in the Jammu region, had been the target of Pakistani shelling because Islamabad considers it to be a "working boundary".

    India has already fenced a considerable part of the IB in Rajasthan without much opposition, as there is no dispute over it.

    "This is an area that has been looked into in great detail," sources said, suggesting that there was no intention to unilaterally convert the LoC into a permanent boundary. Though the work looks suspiciously close to fencing the border, the sources said the final aim matched the intentions expressed by Pakistan — to check the movement of terrorists across the LoC.

    The second leg of the strategy is an exhaustive review of troop deployment along the LoC. Army officials here were short on details because the exercise is on, but said the focus would be on the second tier of defence which, unlike the first, keeps an eye on both infiltration and exfiltration.

    The review will also consider stepping up the supply of "force multipliers" such as imported night vision devices and thermal imagers to detect body heat.

    The third part is installing electronic warfare systems to cut off the ability of Pakistan-based commanders of terrorist organisations to communicate with and pass instructions to militants operating in India.

    The Government is in the process of finalising an elaborate electronic system that would detect and jam all transmissions from Pakistan to operatives in Jammu and Kashmir. The omnibus electronic system will also be able to record most of the transmissions between terrorist groups inside Indian territory, thus considerably cutting down the reaction time of the security forces.

    The Army may like to accelerate work on all these counts following its recent major success in an encounter about 50 km from the LoC. Operating in rugged terrain, troops of the Romeo Force of the Rashtriya Rifles shot dead 60 terrorists and busted 90 hideouts where they were stocking food and ammunition.

    The importance of "Operation Sarp Nash" (extermination of serpents) could be gauged from the fact that the Chief of Army Staff, N.C. Vij, accompanied by the Director-General of Military Operations toured the area for two days in order to boost the morale of the troops who entered into close quarter combat for nearly four weeks while suffering casualties themselves.

    The operation has been called off with the recovery of considerable ammunition and documents, but the troops are learnt to be still scouring slopes of the forbidding Pir Panjal range for remnants of three terrorist organisations that had congregated in what is known as the Hill Kaka area.

    Highly-placed sources said the bulge was strategically located and would have supported conventional operation by cutting off the lines of communication of Indian troops.

    But another, and more likely, interpretation is that terrorists infiltrating from Pakistan used it for regrouping because of thick woods and sparse population. This time they had probably planned to make it a quasi-permanent transit point for their entry into the Kashmir Valley
     

Share This Page