Drug Addiction blights the Punjab in India!

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by Rage, Dec 6, 2010.

  1. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

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    Watch this crazy video:


    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-11920796



    The Iranian-Pakistan drug trade is showing itself on our borders too!

    This is from that shithole, across the border:




    Pakistan is struggling with the highest number of drug addicts in the world.

    Officials have said there are at least five million people using heroin, opiates, or other mind altering substances across the country.

    The United Nations office on drugs and crime estimates around 40 per cent of Afghanistan's heroin and morphine goes through Pakistan, and some of that is used by the more than 600,000 Pakistani opiate abusers.

    Nai Zindagi, or New Life in English, is the country's biggest rehabilitation programme. Every day it helps around 22,000 addicts across Pakistan.

    It gives clean needles to stop the spread of HIV, advises on health issues and gives addicts the chance of getting clean.

    Al Jazeera's Alan Fisher reports from Bara koh in Pakistan.




    This is a video from Iran, where 5 million addicts are estimated to be using junk:




    Why don't people know how to strike a balance?

    This is one area, where int'l cooperation could be worthwhile. For now, get the drug authorities at the border!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
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  3. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    More drugs, fake notes smuggled into Punjab

    More drugs, fake notes smuggled into Punjab
    India - 29 may 2011

    CHANDIGARH: Smuggling of narcotics and counterfeit currency into Punjab from Pakistan is increasing every year.

    Heroin, opium and poppy husk are being frequently smuggled from the neighbouring country.

    The figures obtained from Punjab police reveal that smuggling of fake currency has increased from Rs 90.50 lakh to Rs 2.12 crore in the last three years. And till May 2011, counterfeit notes amounting to Rs 58.45 lakh were seized along the border areas of Punjab.

    In 2008, Punjab police had seized 98.55kg heroin and in 2009, it confiscated 1.55 quintal of the same drug from the border. In 2010, 1.87 quintal heroin was seized and till May 2011, 23.878kg heroin had been found from smugglers.

    In 2008, 5.62 quintal opium was seized and in 2009 it went up to 6.92 quintal. In 2010, the state police caught hold of 7.49 quintal opium from the border areas in Punjab.

    The state police seized fake notes amounting to Rs 1.15 crore in 2009 and Rs 2.12 crore in 2010. The majority of counterfeits were in the denomination of Rs 500 and Rs 1,000.

    Interestingly, there has been a sudden decrease in the number of trained Pakistani spies and smugglers captured in India. In 2009, a total of 11 spies were arrested and in 2010, the figure was only six. Likewise, in 2009, 291 smugglers were arrested while in 2010, only 268 were held by the police.



    Source: The Times of India
     
  4. Tronic

    Tronic Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    The main culprit of this is the government of Punjab which supports drug culture. In a state where the debt is ever increasing, the Punjab government prides itself for increasing excise 4 fold in the past 4 years. This is done by promoting alcohol addiction among the people; 4 fold increase in excise translates into 4 fold increase in alcohol consumption, for a state which is already one of the world's largets per capita consumer of alcohol. Its a sad story. This addiction eventually turns into bootlegging, and drug smuggling of all the other drugs.

    This documentary better reveals the whole picture:

    [YT]S1oU4AquonQ[/YT]
     
  5. parijataka

    parijataka Senior Member Senior Member

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    Losing Punjab to drugs

    Drug usage among youth aged 15-35 years becoming big problem in Punjab.

    Losing Punjab to drugs

     
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  6. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Drug Addiction Is a Growing Problem in Punjab

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/19/w...growing-problem-in-punjab.html?pagewanted=all


    KAZIKOT VILLAGE, India — In this village not far from the Pakistani border, the wheat harvest is only days away. Water buffaloes are resting in the shade. Farmers are preparing their fields. And drug addicts like Pargat Singh are crouched in the shadows, injecting themselves with cocktails of synthetic drugs.

    Dr. Rana Ranbir Singh, a psychiatrist in a government-run clinic, talked to a patient being treated for drug addiction in Punjab State.
    Last Thursday, just after 11 a.m., Mr. Singh followed another man into a dark corner of a decrepit building favored by the roughly 50 addicts in this village. Cracked prescription bottles littered the ground. The other man jabbed a syringe into his arm and injected a blend of prescription drugs that delivers a six-hour high.

    “Save some for me,” said Mr. Singh, who is H.I.V. positive and stricken with tuberculosis. He told a photographer: “Shoot my picture. Make me famous.”

    Throughout the border state of Punjab, whether in villages or cities, drugs have become a scourge. Opium is prevalent, refined as heroin or other illegal substances. Schoolboys sometimes eat small black balls of opium paste, with tea, before classes. Synthetic drugs are popular among those too poor to afford heroin.

    The scale of the problem, if impossible to quantify precisely, is undeniably immense and worrisome. India has one of the world’s youngest populations, a factor that is expected to power future economic growth, yet Punjab is already a reminder of the demographic risks of a glut of young people. An overwhelming majority of addicts are between the ages of 15 and 35, according to one study, with many of them unemployed and frustrated by unmet expectations.

    For the Punjab government, the problem is hardly unknown. Private drug treatment centers, some run by quacks, have proliferated across the state, and treatment wards in government hospitals have seen a surge in patients. Three years ago, a state health official warned in a court affidavit that Punjab risked losing a whole generation to drugs. Roughly 60 percent of all illicit drugs confiscated in India are seized in Punjab.

    Yet when Punjab held state elections this year, the candidates rarely spoke about drug abuse. In fact, India’s Election Commission said that some political workers were actually giving away drugs to try to buy votes. More than 110 pounds of heroin and hundreds of thousands of bottles of bootleg liquor were seized in raids. During the elections, party workers in some districts distributed coupons that voters could redeem at pharmacies, activists said.

    “We have encountered the problem of liquor during elections in almost all states,” S. Y. Quaraishi, India’s chief election commissioner, told reporters. “But drug abuse is unique only to Punjab. This is really of concern.”

    Punjab’s reluctance to treat the drug situation as a full-blown crisis is partly because the state government itself is dependent on revenue from alcohol sales. Roughly 8,000 government liquor stores operate in Punjab, charging a tax on every bottle — an excise that represents one of the government’s largest sources of revenue. India’s comptroller found that liquor consumption per person in Punjab rose 59 percent between 2005 and 2010.

    “We are promoting addiction in our state,” said Dr. Manjit Singh Randhawa, the city of Amritsar’s civil surgeon, a job akin to chief medical officer. “I’m getting calls from people saying they have lost their children, they have lost their breadwinners. In every village, people are falling prey to this drug abuse.”

    Ranvinder Singh Sandhu, a sociologist in Amritsar, surveyed 600 drug addicts in rural and urban areas of Punjab and found that they were usually young, poor and unemployed. He said that most villages did not have health clinics but did have three or four drugstores, which often made sizable profits selling pills and other synthetic drugs to addicts who cannot afford heroin.

    Mr. Sandhu said he had completed his study six years ago, at the request of Punjab’s governor, yet had never been contacted by any state official about the findings. “The state is not conceiving it as a social problem,” he said. “They are conceiving it as a personal problem.”

    Opium has a long history in Punjab, and was commonly and legally consumed here before India and Pakistan gained independence in 1947. Today, Punjab is a primary gateway for opiates smuggled into India from Pakistan and Afghanistan. Opium is also grown legally in India for medicinal purposes, and some of the crop arrives in Punjab on the black market.

    The problem is prevalent in middle-class enclaves, where some users are hooked on heroin. One impoverished neighborhood of Amritsar, called Maqboolpura, is known as the Village of Widows — because so many young men have died of drug abuse.

    “Drugs are available everywhere,” said Ajit Singh, who has spent 13 years running a school for poor children affected by drug abuse. Of the school’s 656 students, roughly 70 percent have lost a parent to drugs. One girl, a fifth grader, lost five uncles and her father to drug-related deaths.

    In Kazikot Village, about a two-hour drive from Amritsar, a local nongovernmental organization tries to prevent the spread of H.I.V. by regularly distributing clean syringes to addicts. The group’s workers say there are 48 hard-core addicts in the village (out of more than 2,000 people) but that many other people use drugs. Government officials have sponsored “camps” here, with health officials providing antidrug information or trying to persuade addicts to undergo treatment — neither of which, villagers say, has been successful.

    “Everybody knows about it,” said Hira Singh, a local shopkeeper. “But nobody does anything to stop it.”

    Mr. Singh, the H.I.V.-positive addict, lives at his parents’ home with his younger brother and his sister. He started using drugs at age 15, and then quit school. He worked for several years pulling a rickshaw, got married and had a daughter. Later, his wife gave premature birth to twin sons, who died. Unable to abide her husband’s drug use, his wife left him and their daughter, Harpreet, 3.

    “He steals things from the house,” said Seema Kaur, his sister. “Sometimes, he steals money.”

    Mr. Singh, now 29, said he had tried many times to quit using drugs, but the urge was too strong. Because of his tuberculosis, he said, he is careful not to get to close to his daughter. “I play with her from a distance,” he said. “I try not to hug her, so that she doesn’t get infected.”

    He added: “My future is finished. I am basically dead now.”
     
  7. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Re: Drug Addiction Is a Growing Problem in Punjab

    Heroin horror stalks India's most remote villages - CNN

    Heroin horror stalks India's most remote villages

    India's Punjab state is the birthplace of Bhangra music, home of the colorful turban and the exquisite golden temple.

    It is a state in India where the population has prospered for many years. It has one of the lowest poverty rates in the country thanks to fertile farmland, abundant water supply and decent infrastructure. But the Punjab finds itself with a serious problem among its population -- drug addiction.

    Addict Inderjeet Singh says at least half of the students in his school were taking drugs.

    At 16 he says he was popping up to 10 prescription pills a day and washing them down with codeine cough syrup.

    "When I take it I feel like I am wandering in heaven. I feel like a king of the whole world." Singh said.

    At 20 he is in a drug rehab hospital where he prays, does yoga and learns candle making as he tries to kick the habit that was turning him into a zombie.

    "I stopped recognizing even my parents," he said.

    At the same hospital another man also named Inderjeet Singh (and no relation) said his drug of choice was heroin.

    At 25 he said he would become violent if he didn't get a hit at least once a day. But finding the drug was never a problem even in what appear to be simple villages.

    "It can be bought anytime from anywhere," he said. "20 to 25 families would be selling it in one village alone."

    The cost: the equivalent of about $20 for five grams.

    The United Nations 2011 drug and crime report says India is the largest consumer of heroin in South Asia, which stands to reason as it has the largest population in the region by far.

    But the report has negated a perception that India is only a transit point for drugs coming in from Afghanistan and Pakistan.

    The report comes as no surprise to those in India's Punjab State, which borders Pakistan.

    Some state officials estimate more than 50 percent of the population between 18 and 35 are using drugs illegally - including anything from heroin to abusing prescription drugs.

    "As far as drug addiction in Punjab is concerned, the situation is explosive. It's worrisome. The young people are dying and the elders are becoming their pallbearer. Statistics show one addict is dying every eight minutes in Punjab," said Mohan Sharma, project director of the Red Cross De-addiction Hospital in Sangrur.

    The U.N. says it is hard to get accurate statistics on drug use in India. But if those numbers are anywhere near true, it far exceeds the U.N.'s estimation of global illicit substance abuse for the 15-64 age range, which is 4.8 percent.

    Even with 63 drug rehab centers in Punjab state they cannot seem to reverse the trend.. There is fear here that a whole generation will be locked in a terrible cycle of drugging and dying if more isn't done.
     
  8. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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  9. deaddiction

    deaddiction New Member

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    De-addiction centers Phoenix Foundation is a center approved by the government for the rehabilitation of drug addicts and alcoholics. Addicts are closely monitored by a medical team until they are cured of all their withdrawal symptoms. They are then allowed to join the process of rehabilitation with alcoholics. They learn to accept each other and mingle freely with each other.

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  10. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Sukhbir Badal sala majithia is king pin of drug trade in punjab
     
  11. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    Majithia's sis and bro in law with Modi :troll:

    [​IMG]

    =

    Jaitley ne ED laadi Majithia de picche, election haar da badla :D
     
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  12. deaddiction

    deaddiction New Member

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    Re: Drug Addiction Is a Growing Problem in Punjab

    Phoenix Foundation is one of the Rehabilitation centres in Hyderabad. When individuals and family members struggling with alcohol or drug addiction begin the search for treatment, they usually go through a process of elimination to arrive at their option. According to cancer professionals, alcohol and drugs can cause seven specific types of cancer or probably more. It is a limited risk to increase the chances of improving cancer for anyone who regularly drinks alcohol, even in small quantities and you do not have to be getting drunk every night at risk. Phoenix Foundation Rehabilitation centre offers the opportunities to assess alcohol or drugs and to explore ways to get things under control again.

    What are the signs of an alcohol and other drugs problem?

    1. Has your drug consuming or drinking caused you to have any health problems?
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    3. Have you ever injured yourself or any other person after drug consumption or drinking?
    4. Are you in financial complexity as a result of your drug consumption or drinking?
    5. Is alcohol or drugs affecting your personal relationships?
    6. Do you take drugs or drink more often now than you used to?
    7. Is your drug consuming or drinking jeopardizing your work?

    If you answered yes to any of these questions or you are concerned about your current use of alcohol or drugs, Phoenix Foundation can help you decide the extent of the problem and identify solutions.

    For more details please Contact Us:
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    Web: phoenixrehab
     
  13. phoenixrehabindia

    phoenixrehabindia New Member

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    Drug Rehab Centers in India
    We offer secure service integrated high quality rehab to people whose lives have been affected by the harmful use of or addiction to drugs and alcohol. You will be supported, challenged and motivated to make positive changes in your life so that you can find hope, way, peace and strength.

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    4. Phoenix Foundation: Phoenix Foundation confidence in Hyderabad, India seeks to provide the better rehabilitation of the evidence-based practice for people with moderately to severely affect by their harmful use or dependence on alcohol or drugs.

    If you are worried about your current use of drug or alcohol, Phoenix Foundation can help you with further evaluation to determine the extent of the problem and find solutions.
     
  14. Redhawk

    Redhawk Regular Member

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    There is no such thing as a former narcotics addict or a former alcoholic. Once one is an addict or alcoholic one is an addict or alcoholic for life. If the individual addict stops using narcotics or the individual alcoholic stops drinking alcohol, then they are a clean addict or a sober alcoholic, but they are still an addict or an alcoholic. Once addiction to narcotics or alcohol enters a person, it is there for the rest of his life. Once addicted to narcotics or alcoholic, there is no going back. The addict either kicks drugs entirely and stays off narcotics and other drugs and intoxicants, like alcohol, for the rest of his life or the alcoholic kicks alcohol and other intoxicants and drugs stays off them entirely or they are the deadest of dead meat.
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2014
  15. phoenixrehabindia

    phoenixrehabindia New Member

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    Rehabilitation in Hyderabad

    Alcohol Abuse Treatment and Self-Help
    Phoenix Foundation is a leading Rehabilitation in Hyderabad.Overcome his alcohol addiction can be a long and bumpy road. At times, it may even seem impossible. But it is not. If you are ready to stop drinking and eager to get the support you need, you can rehab from alcoholism and alcohol abuse, no matter how addiction or how you feel helpless. You do not have to wait until you hit bottom you can change at any time. Read to start on the road to recovery today.
    Can I cut back on my drinking or do I need to stop drinking completely?
    Whether or not you can successfully reduce your alcohol consumption depends on the severity of your drinking problem.If you are an alcoholic, which by definition means that you are not able to control your drinking - it is better to try to stop drinking completely. But if you 're not ready to take that step, or if you do not have a problem with alcohol abuse, but want to reduce for personal or health reasons, the following tips adapted from the National Institute on abuse of alcohol and alcoholism can help:
    • Set a drinking goal. Choose a limit for how much you will drink. Make sure that your limit is no more than one drink a day if you are a woman or two drinks per day if you are a man. Now write your drinking goal on a piece of paper. Put it where you can see, like on your refrigerator or bathroom mirror.
    • Keep a "diary" of your drinking. To help you achieve your goal , keep a "diary" of your drinking. For example, write every time you have a drink for 1 week . Try to keep your diary for three or four weeks . This will show you how much you drink and when. You might be surprised . How different is your goal from the amount you eat now?
    • Pay attention to the house. Keep a small amount or no alcohol at home. Do not keep temptations around .
    • Drink slowly. When you drink, sip your drink slowly. Take a break of one hour between drinks . Soda drink, water or juice after a drink with alcohol. Do not drink on an empty stomach ! Eat food when drinking.
    • Take a break from alcohol. Choose a day or two a week when you're not drinking at all. Then try to stop drinking for 1 week. Think about how you feel physically and emotionally on these days. When you succeed and feel better, maybe you will find it easier to cut for good.

    For more details please Contact Us:
    Phone: +91 77999 19293, +91 77999 00044
     

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