DRDO's Directed Energy Weapon (DEWs), Laser-Based Anti-Missile anti-aircrafts System

Discussion in 'Strategic Forces' started by luckyy, Aug 26, 2010.

  1. luckyy

    luckyy Regular Member

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    By Vivek Raghuvanshi
    Published: 25 Aug 2010 17:01

    NEW DELHI - Indian scientists are developing laser-based anti-ballistic missile systems called Directed Energy Weapons (DEWs).

    Developed by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), DEW weapons can kill incoming ballistic missiles by bombarding them with subatomic particles or electromagnetic waves. The weapons could intercept missiles soon after they were launched toward India.

    A DRDO scientist said laser-based weapons have been tested. One of these weapons is the air defense dazzler, which can engage enemy aircraft and helicopters at a range of 10 kilometers. This weapon will be ready for induction in two years.

    India's laser weapons can be deployed in the Navy's submarines and destroyers, and Air Force fighters and transport planes.

    The DEW laser weapon is capable of producing 25-kilowatt pulses that can destroy a ballistic missile within seven kilometers, the scientist said.

    India Developing Laser-Based Anti-Missile Systems - Defense News
     
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  3. luckyy

    luckyy Regular Member

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    India Seeks DIRCM Partners To Protect Aircraft From Missiles - Defense News

    NEW DELHI - India is looking for overseas partners to jointly develop a laser-based directed infrared countermeasure (DIRCM) system to protect aircraft against ground-launched infrared guided missiles.

    The DIRCM will be jointly produced with India's state-owned Defence Avionics Research Establishment (DARE), based in Bangalore.

    Global tenders for the multimillion-dollar contract have been sent to defense companies in Europe, Israel, Russia and the United States, said a senior official of the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), which controls the DARE laboratory.

    The DIRCM self-protection suite is a laser-based directed infrared countermeasure system for protecting aircraft and helicopters against shoulder-launched heat-seeking missiles known as MANPADS.

    The Indian Air Force re-evaluated the threat from such missiles after the Kargil battle in 1999 when two of its aircraft, a MiG-21 and a MiG-27, and an attack helicopter were hit by MANPADS, Air Force sources said.

    The service wants systems with jamming capabilities as part of the defense against such missiles Air Force sources said all the aircraft will be equipped with advanced DIRCM systems while the helicopters are equipped with protection against infrared-seeking air-to-air missiles.

    A DARE official said a missile warning system would cue DIRCM, which then would turn toward the approaching threat and direct its laser beam toward the missile's seeker to disrupt its guidance system and break its lock on the aircraft.

    India wants the DIRCM to be able to counter current-generation MANPADS, a senior Defence Ministry official said. The system should be able to defeat a missile fired from below the aircraft and should be effective at altitudes of at least 15,000 feet.

    Though the current tender is mainly for Air Force aircraft, helicopter protection is also vital, the Defence Ministry official said.
     
  4. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    ^^ Old news. So far no firm showed response to DRDO's DIRCM project. Its been more than 2 years to the same now. DRDO should move ahead alone on this project. It should rather seek partners within the country like PSUs & Pvt companies for R&D then follow it into Defense product. Without industry participation & proactive research desi DIRCM is hollow distant dream.
     
  5. luckyy

    luckyy Regular Member

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    NEW DELHI, Aug. 31 (UPI) -- Bent on becoming a regional superpower, India is pursuing ways to develop laser-guided anti-ballistic missiles.

    Dubbed direct energy weapons and developed by the Defense Research and Development Organization, the new weapons are intended to kill incoming, hostile ballistic missiles "by bombarding them with subatomic particles or electromagnetic waves," the Defense News Web site reported.

    In a planning document written earlier this month, India's Defense Ministry said it would place what it called its highest priorities on direct energy weapons for the next 15 years. Trials of the weapons are expected within the coming years should scientists stay on schedule with the development program.

    Indian scientists say they have already begun testing. The defense dazzler was reported to be one of the first weapons put to test, engaging enemy aircraft and helicopters within a range of 6 miles.

    This system alone, Defense News reported, will be inducted into the country's defense apparatus by 2012.

    "Lasers are weapons of the future. We can, for instance, use laser beams to shoot down an enemy missile in its boost or terminal phase," The Times of India recently quoted Anil Kumar Maini, who heads the Indian Defense Research and Development Organization's Laser Science and Technology Center.

    The direct energy weapons are capable of producing 25-kilowatt pulses that can destroy intruding missiles. They are said to be considered by the Indian navy for deployment on submarines and destroyers. They may also be mounted on combat aircraft and transport planes.

    India's designs come amid efforts to establish a defense shield capable of knocking down hostile ballistic missiles.

    Should India succeed, it will join Israel, Russia and the United States in both developing and owning such defense technology.

    Although manufactured domestically, the system's tracking and fire control radars have been developed with Israel and France.

    Bent on bolstering its military might, India announced plans recently to spend up to $30 billion on its military by 2012.

    The Times of India reported that laser-based weapons would comprise one component of a wider India missile defense network now under development. The newspaper noted, however, that the country's Defense Research and Development Organization is known to make claims regarding technology that it cannot ultimately produce.

    India prepares laser-guided missiles - UPI.com
     
  6. luckyy

    luckyy Regular Member

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    US dubious about the prospects of India possessing advanced laser weapons

    India's Claims of Laser Weapons: 'Nonsense' or Threat?

    (Aug. 31) -- An elaborate bluff? A case of overly optimistic technology? Or perhaps just old-fashioned boasting? Whatever the explanation, India's claims that it is on the brink of deploying advanced laser weapons is attracting attention from Pakistan.

    Defense News, a military trade publication, reported in a recent article that India was developing a variety of new energy-beam weapons, including one that "can kill incoming ballistic missiles by bombarding them with subatomic particles or electromagnetic waves."

    In this infrared image released by the U.S. Department of Defense, the Missile Defense Agency's Airborne Laser, right, destroys a short-range ballistic missile

    Other lasers under development include a laser "dazzler" weapon that could be directed at aircraft from up to 10 kilometers away or aimed at people for use as a nonlethal device. The weapons are being developed by the Defence Research and Development Organisation, a government agency that develops technology and weapons for the Indian military.

    But there's a large difference between missile-destroying laser beams, which typically require large amounts of energy, and lower-powered laser dazzlers, which can be used to disorient or temporarily blind people.

    Regardless, India's archrival, Pakistan, is following the news closely. "The Indian government has decided to equip its police and paramilitary forces in the Occupied Kashmir valley with slew of 'Directed Energy Weapons,' also called 'laser dazzlers,' to tackle Kashmiri protesters," Pakistan's The Nation newspaper reported.

    U.S. scientists who have worked on military weapons expressed skepticism about India's claims. That's not surprising, since the Pentagon, for example, has invested some 30 years and billions of dollars in creating directed-energy weapons designed to shoot down ballistic missiles, and so far nothing has been deployed.

    The U.S. Air Force has worked for years on the airborne laser, a megawatt-powered chemical laser housed on a Boeing jumbo jet that successfully shot down a missile target earlier this year in a test. But the Pentagon has shelved plans to deploy the weapon, citing concerns about its feasibility.

    Laser weapons certainly have military applications, Mark Lewis, a former Air Force chief scientist, told AOL News, but he doubted that India has made a huge breakthrough in the field. "I have never seen anything to suggest they are very far along," he said.

    Peter Zimmerman, the former chief scientist of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, was equally dubious about the prospects of India possessing advanced laser weapons. "Laser dazzlers are straightforward," he told AOL News, noting that commercially available green lasers can be aimed at landing aircraft to distract the pilots.

    But missile-destroying laser weapons are less likely, he said. "Laser weapons from India?" Zimmerman asked. "Probable nonsense."
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2010
  7. sandeepdg

    sandeepdg Senior Member Senior Member

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    Just because the Americans couldn't develop something satisfactory in laser weapons, they believe that nobody else can, especially a third world nation !! We developed a lot of cutting edge technology in various sciences on our own, we sure as hell can develop laser weapons !! We will see who is what in the near future !
     
  8. Agantrope

    Agantrope Senior Member Senior Member

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    Hegemony at its best, Till today Unkil haven't produced a cruise missile with supersonic speed :D, i mean to compete the Soviet
     
  9. sandeepdg

    sandeepdg Senior Member Senior Member

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    Mr. Zimmerman seems to be confused about the differences between "green lasers" used to distract pilots of landing aircrafts and a directed energy beam which can disorient an combat aircraft travelling at supersonic speed at a distance of 10 kms from the target !!! What a stupid comparison, especially from someone with so many credentials ! :special10:
     
  10. Sri

    Sri Regular Member

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    DRDO Develops New Laser-Based Anti-Ballistic Missile Systems | India Defence

    Indian scientists at Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) are designing new laser-based anti-missile systems called the Directed Energy Weapons (DEWs).

    The Directed Energy Weapons bombard incoming ballistic missiles with electromagnetic waves or subatomic particles to destroy them. The laser weapons are suitable for Air Force transport planes and fighters, and Navy’s destroyers and submarines.

    According to a DRDO scientist, the laser-based anti-ballistic missile systems have gone through standard testing procedures. An air defense dazzler, one of the weapons, can engage enemy helicopters at a 10 km range. The laser weapon will be set for induction in the next two years.

    The scientist added that the DEW can generate 25 kW pulses, which can shoot down a missile within 7 km. Scientists are currently testing the Prithvi anti-ballistic missile system, which is scheduled for induction by 2013. The Prithvi can destroy ballistic missiles at a range of 80 km. The scientist informed that Indian scientists are developing the second-phase Prithvis, which is capable of destroying incoming ballistic missiles.
     
  11. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    it should be is going through or will go through ???
     
  12. keshtopatel

    keshtopatel Regular Member

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    Water assets are better placed (warcrafts) than an aerial platform to launch a shooting (Laser) beam, because it requires lot of cooling. Other thing being the high electric energy consumed by solid state lasers when they are born, the more KWs the better results, but extreme electrical power in use, hence very big platform.

    US is using four time more KWs than India.
     

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