Dosa Plaza: How Prem Ganapathy built Rs 30 crore empire

Discussion in 'Economy & Infrastructure' started by BangersAndMash, Feb 26, 2012.

  1. BangersAndMash

    BangersAndMash Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2011
    Messages:
    748
    Likes Received:
    539
    Location:
    England
    Dosa Plaza: How Prem Ganapathy built Rs 30 crore empire with seed capital of just Rs 1000

    A class X passout with no particular skill set, I was lured to Mumbai, only to be robbed. It was an inauspicious start to my entrepreneurial journey, but it turned out for the best.

    I belonged to a poor family from Nagalapuram in Tamil Nadu's Tuticorin district and had to abandon my dreams of higher studies to support my parents and seven siblings. I headed for Chennai, but only managed odd jobs, which fetched around Rs 250 a month that I'd send back home.

    One day, an acquaintance offered me a job promising a salary of Rs 1,200 per month in Mumbai. I knew my parents would never approve of my decision to shift base, so I left for Mumbai without informing them. It was 1990 and I was just 17 years old. The acquaintance robbed me off the Rs 200 I had, leaving me stranded at Bandra.

    I hardly understood the language and did not know anyone in the city, but returning wasn't an option since I was penniless. So I did the only thing I could: I decided to stay on and try my luck.

    The very next day I got a job washing dishes at a local bakery at Mahim for a salary of Rs 150 a month. The good bit was that I could sleep at the bakery itself. In the next two years, I picked up odd jobs at various restaurants and tried to save as much as possible.

    In 1992, I managed to save up enough to start my own food business, selling idlis and dosas. I rented a handcart for about Rs 150 and ploughed in another Rs 1,000 to buy utensils, a stove and basic ingredients, and set up shop on the street opposite the Vashi train station.

    The same year, I brought in two of my brothers, Murugan and Paramashivan, who were younger than me by two and four years, respectively, to help with the business. We were very particular about quality and cleanliness, and unlike the people running other roadside eateries, we were very well-dressed and wore caps.

    I got the recipes for dosas and the sambhar from my native place, which attracted a lot of customers. Soon enough, the business was booming and we were generating a net profit of around Rs 20,000 every month.

    We even managed to rent out a small space at Vashi, which doubled as our living quarters and a makeshift kitchen, where we would prepare all the ingredients and masala every day.

    However, it wasn't smooth sailing. We faced the risk of the cart being seized by the municipal authorities as handcart foodstalls do not get licences to ply their trade.

    In fact, our cart was seized several times and I had to pay a fine to have it released. Thankfully, the harassment ended when we saved enough to open a restaurant.


    In 1997, we leased a small space in the same locality by paying a deposit of Rs 50,000 and named it Prem Sagar Dosa Plaza. We paid a monthly rental of Rs 5,000 and also hired two people.

    FULL STORY: Dosa Plaza: How Prem Ganapathy built Rs 30 crore empire with seed capital of just Rs 1000 - Economic Times
     
  2.  
  3. KS

    KS Bye bye DFI Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Messages:
    8,008
    Likes Received:
    5,718
    Location:
    irrelevant
    Moral of the story : Dosai along with sambhar and chutney rocks !!
     
    arunpat, bhramos and BangersAndMash like this.
  4. Iamanidiot

    Iamanidiot Elite Member Elite Member

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2009
    Messages:
    5,326
    Likes Received:
    1,493
    but tamizh make really bad chutneys .The chutneys are never upto their sambhar gold standard
     
  5. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Messages:
    24,274
    Likes Received:
    11,283
    Location:
    BANGalore
    Any good food rocks.
     
  6. H.A.

    H.A. Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2011
    Messages:
    1,445
    Likes Received:
    679
    There are many more stories like these where people from a very humble background have risen well economically....
     
  7. KS

    KS Bye bye DFI Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Messages:
    8,008
    Likes Received:
    5,718
    Location:
    irrelevant
    I actually don't eat sambhar for Dosa. Only chutney....May be you went to a wrong hotel..:p
     
  8. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2012
    Messages:
    20,992
    Likes Received:
    11,823
    Location:
    Akhand Bharat
    idli and dosa are really good and healthy but u can not eat everyday.

    Q to my south Indian friends?

    Do u eat sambar idli ,dosa,utpam,curd rice everyday and every time

    when i was studying in UK, i had some south Indian house mates. Every time they eat curd rice in breakfast,lunch and in dinner,some times idli in breakfast


    as a punjabi ,i was surprised
     
  9. KS

    KS Bye bye DFI Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Messages:
    8,008
    Likes Received:
    5,718
    Location:
    irrelevant
    I personally used to have Dosa/idly with different chutneys (coconut,onion,tomato,coriander,channa dal, Pudhina etc) almost everyday for dinner. Curd rice NO. Lunch compulsory rice,veggies with some dal sambhar. Two days a week would be non-veg.

    Two reasons :

    Either they would have been brahmins or they were too lazy to cook. I dont know how they eat that 24*7 :lol:
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2012
  10. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2012
    Messages:
    20,992
    Likes Received:
    11,823
    Location:
    Akhand Bharat
    yes they were Brahmins, one's father was owner or may be head priest in temple in south India..

    but he drinks beer with me lolllllllll.
     
  11. KS

    KS Bye bye DFI Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Messages:
    8,008
    Likes Received:
    5,718
    Location:
    irrelevant
    See I guessed it correctly. :lol:

    Thayiru saadams...:lol:
     
  12. BangersAndMash

    BangersAndMash Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2011
    Messages:
    748
    Likes Received:
    539
    Location:
    England
    Post the stories! Inspire DFI members!
     
  13. mayfair

    mayfair Elite Member Elite Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2010
    Messages:
    2,584
    Likes Received:
    1,760
    Location:
    India
    You forgot to include piping hot idlis and vadai with that?

    Blasphemy..I demand apology for that this lack of respect should not go unpunished so as to redeem the honour of both idli and vadai loving folks..

    or else... :shoot:
     
  14. KS

    KS Bye bye DFI Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Messages:
    8,008
    Likes Received:
    5,718
    Location:
    irrelevant
    :p

    I was always a sucker for Dosa and not much into idli.
     
  15. mayfair

    mayfair Elite Member Elite Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2010
    Messages:
    2,584
    Likes Received:
    1,760
    Location:
    India
    I love them both. I think this may be Bangalore thing, but idli/vadai dipped in copious amounts of sambaar, topped with generous amounts of chutney accompanied by piping hot kapi in a steel tumbler (and a plate of kesari baath) seemed to be the most popular breakfast..especially in the innumerable darshinis scattered all over the city.

    Of course dosai, set dosai, poori saagu, chow-chow baath are popular as well.

    Love them all.
     
  16. H.A.

    H.A. Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2011
    Messages:
    1,445
    Likes Received:
    679
    Give me some time and i shall be happy to do that....
     

Share This Page