Dogs all over the world that fought for a cause

Discussion in 'Members Corner' started by hitesh, Nov 26, 2011.

  1. hitesh

    hitesh New Member

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    story1 : location : INDIA (J&K).


    THE DOG'S NAME WAS Rex.

    Rex was a recipient of GOC-in-C Commendation Card for his outstanding & exemplary performance against militants. The 9A 92 Rex, a golden Labrador was born on 25 February 1993 at RVC Centre & School Meerut. After a year's training, he was posted to 14 Army Dog Unit under Delta Force and assigned the areas adjoining the town of Bhaderwah, to help troops in trailing & tracking militants. In March 1995, operating with troops of 25 RR in jungles of Badrot, South of Bhaderwah, he tracked a militant injured in an encounter for over 3 km in the thick of militant fire. In a chase that lasted for over four hours, he managed to recover one AK 56 rifles and an haversack containing 92 rounds. Recently, in April 1998, out on a patrol in area Gulgandhar, security forces killed two dreaded militants and badly injured one, who managed to escape. Picking up the scent of his blood, 'Rex' went hot on the trail and moved speedily & stealthily over strenuous undulating mountains. After tracking over 2 km, he succeeded in tracing out the body of the militant in a hideout where he had succumbed to his injuries. Let out on yet another 'trial' with the QRT of CO 25 RR in Daraba near Rajouri, Rex suffered an unfortunate fall and sustained serious intestinal injuries. He was evacuated to the nearest Army Veterinary Hospital where he developed acute gastroentrities and finally succumbed on 22 September 1999.
     
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  3. hitesh

    hitesh New Member

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    BRAVE INDIAN ARMY DOGS
    (by brig mahajan)

    We had our share of local dogs who were excellent sentries at gun positions. The local dogs were ideal guides in white out conditions too. In Drass Area with 8 feet of snow off the road the dogs would mark the route by peeing every 50m. Extremely well trained and dependable; they would wait for troops at the road head and take them to the gun position and back. I have of course been guided by them often when you can't see a thing.
    About our dogs from the dog unit we had 'Dixit' a veteran with a few medals to his credit. We had pressed him into service for an avalanche rescue mission. A black Labrador; he used go around in a cheetah with his trainer and kit. Often temp were too low for them to operate; but they did som fine tasks. A dog can only be trained for one task.

    Dogs are good but too many can be bad particularly in winter when there is no food; thats when they begin killing each other; there was an incident when a JCO was killed in a unit in Karu in 1988 or 89. Then you have to do the needful; no choice.
    But they are a man's best friend; provided.....but then in life nothing is unconditional.
    ANOTHER EXPERIENCE
    We have our own tales of our very own 'dogs of war' and forget the ones of Army Dog units, I am talking of local pie dogs of posts particularly the ones in Glacier. There are any number of their stories, all true and believe me I have experienced it myself. It was Jul ' 91and I was getting inducted in Siala complex of Northern Glacier and that day we were moving from Camp IV to Benazir DZ, the toughest stretch of induction route.Midway the weather packed, it started snowing and there was 'white out' all over. The route markers placed after every 50 mtrs or so became invisible and to make matters worst the link Ptl Cdr of outgoing bn started going the wrong way. Fortunately the post dog accompanying us wouldn't budge and stayed put at the pt where we had deviated from and kept barking incessantly. After some hesitant steps prestige was swallowed survival given precedence and the Ptl Cdr frankly admitted that we were lost! But at the same time he mentioned the dog's barking was his way of telling us that we were heading in the wrong direction. We reposed our faith in the dog's sense of smell to bail us out of the precarious sit and let him lead there after. Much to our relief after half an hour or so in which we may have covered just about 400-500m there was bit of an opening in the weather for two/three mins and much to our relief we spotted a route marker. We knew we were safe!!! They ie our own 'dogs of war' are also the unsung heroes of Glacier.Those of us who have served there (and I have served twice there) will probably appre better what we went through. Then there are tales of "Pista" and his 'wife' "Pisti" of Southern Glacier, "Kambal Baba" of Central Glacier and any number of them.
     
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  4. Param

    Param Senior Member Senior Member

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    :dude::dude::dude:

    The only real cause dogs fight for is mating and food.
     
  5. hitesh

    hitesh New Member

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  6. hitesh

    hitesh New Member

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    DON'T troll , Enlighten your self a bit . may be they are less violent then you .......
     
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  7. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

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    It would have good if you got pics..

    Anyways good start..
     
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  8. Param

    Param Senior Member Senior Member

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    Do you mean like yourself?
     
  9. hitesh

    hitesh New Member

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    Bomb-sniffing Army dog dies of broken heart after Taliban kill his master

    in life, they were united in their tireless work saving countless British soldiers in Afghanistan.
    In death, they were united in tragedy.
    Shortly after Lance Corporal Liam Tasker was killed in a firefight with the Taliban, his devoted Army search dog Theo suffered a seizure and passed away too


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    Liam Tasker was on patrol with his dog Theo at the time of the attack in Nahr-e-Saraj, Afghanistan
     
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  10. hitesh

    hitesh New Member

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    The pair had uncovered 14 home-made bombs and hoards of weapons in just five months – a record for a dog and his handler in the conflict.
    L/Cpl Tasker, 26, this week became the 358th British serviceman to die in the ten-year conflict.
    Only last month he described his joy at the close bond he had developed with Theo, a 22-month-old springer spaniel cross.
    ‘I love my job and working together with Theo. He has a great character and never tires,’ he said in an interview on the Ministry of Defence website.
    ‘He can’t wait to get out and do his job and will stop at nothing.’
    Theo and L/Cpl Tasker, an Arms and Explosives Search dog handler of the Royal Army Veterinary Corps, 1st Military Working Dog Regiment, were part of the Theatre Military Working Dogs Support Unit based at Camp Bastion.
    On Tuesday they took part in a mission in the Nahr-e Saraj district in Helmand, a hotbed of the insurgency.
    Theo’s task was to be the ‘front man’, sniffing out any hidden IEDs, weapons and bomb-making equipment.
    But a firefight broke out with the Taliban and L/Cpl Tasker was shot dead.
    After his body was flown back to Camp Bastion, his beloved Theo is thought to have died of a broken heart.
    The soldier, from Kirkcaldy, Fife, leaves behind mother Jane Duffy, father Ian Tasker, brother Ian, sisters Laura and Nicola and girlfriend Leah Walters.


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    In a statement, his family said: ‘There are three words that best describe Liam: larger than life. He lit up every room he walked into with his cheeky smile.
    ‘He died a hero doing a job he was immensely passionate about. We are so proud of him and everything he’s achieved. Words can’t describe how sorely he will be missed.’
    Miss Walters added: ‘LT never met anyone without touching their lives in some way. I am the proudest girlfriend there could ever be and there will be an LT-sized hole in my life forever. Sleep well, my darling, my soulmate, my best friend.’
    Lieutenant Colonel David Thorpe, commanding officer 1st Military Working Dog Regiment, also paid tribute to L/Cpl Tasker, saying: ‘He genuinely loved the dogs he worked with and was always able to get the best out of them.
    ‘Epitomising the hard-working, determined and ambitious nature of our very best soldiers, he wanted to go to Afghanistan. He wanted to ply his trade in the harshest of environments, to be outside of his comfort zone and he wanted to be successful. He was.
    ‘The work he did in his five months in Afghanistan saved countless lives, of that I have no doubt.’
    L/Cpl Tasker joined the Army in 2001 as a vehicle mechanic in the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers. But his passion for animals led to a transfer to the Royal Army Veterinary Corps in 2007.
    He only learned about the dog unit when a friend showed him videos of them in action. He spent 15 weeks on a handlers’ course with Theo, where they learned to work as a team and developed their bond.
    Once in Afghanistan, Theo was so successful at detecting explosives that his tour of duty was due to be extended by a month.
    Major Caroline Emmett, Officer Commanding 104 Military Working Dog Squadron, said: ‘L/Cpl Tasker was one of the best people I have ever known. Kind, with a good heart, he always put others before himself. He and his dog Theo were made for each other.’
    Defence Secretary Liam Fox said he was ‘deeply saddened’ by the news.
    ‘It is clear that L/Cpl Tasker was a dedicated and highly capable soldier whose skills in handling dogs were second to none,’ he said.
    ‘He and his dog Theo had saved many lives and we will be eternally grateful for this.’
     
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  11. hitesh

    hitesh New Member

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    HEART-WRENCHING IMAGE: DOG KEEPS WATCH OVER FALLEN SEAL’S CASKET DURING FUNERAL



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    Petty Officer Jon T. Tumilson was laid to rest Friday in Rockford, Iowa, where an estimated 1,500 mourners came to pay respects for the fallen Navy SEAL, including his dog Hawkeye. In fact, Hakeye’s loyalty to his owner at the funeral was visible, creating a heart-wrenching image as he laid down by the casket of his owner during the entire service:
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    The 35-year-old Tumilson died Aug. 6, when a rocket-propelled grenade disabled the helicopter he was in. It crashed, killing 30 Americans and eight Afghans. He was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart and Defense Meritorious Service Medal.
     
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  12. hitesh

    hitesh New Member

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    Hachiko: The World’s Most Loyal Dog


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    Hachiko was brought to Tokyo in 1924 by his owner, a college professor named Hidesamuro Ueno. Each day, when Ueno left for work, Hachiko would stand by the door to watch him go. When the professor came home at 4 o’clock, Hachiko would go to the Shibuya Station to meet him.

    Though this simple act alone shows a tremendous amount of loyalty, that’s not the end of it: The following year, Ueno died of a stroke while at the university. Hachiko didn’t realize that he was gone, and so the dog returned to the train station every single day to await his master. He became such a familiar presence there, in fact, that the station master set out food for the dog and gave him a bed in the station. Even so, Hachiko never shifted loyalties –every day at 4 o’clock, he hopefully waited by the tracks as the train pulled in, searching for his best friend’s face among the people getting off.

    Hachiko’s love for his master impressed many people who passed through the station, including one of Ueno’s former students, who became fascinated by the Akita breed after seeing Hachiko. He discovered that there were only 30 Akitas living in Japan, and began to write articles about Hachiko and his remarkable breed, turning the world’s most loyal dog into a household name, and creating a resurgence in popularity for the Akita.

    Hachiko died in 1935, after 10 long years of waiting for his master. But the dog would not be forgotten –a year before his death, Shibuya Station installed a bronze statue of the aging dog, to honor its mascot. Though the statue was melted down during World War II, a new version was created in 1948 by the son of the original artist. Go to the station now, and you’ll be able to see the bronze statue of Hachiko – still waiting, as ever, for his master to come home
     
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  13. Iamanidiot

    Iamanidiot Elite Member Elite Member

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    Real life incident. My paternal grandfathers life was saved by his Combais and Rajapalayams from a sloth bear when he used to hunt at Rampa
     
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  14. hitesh

    hitesh New Member

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    Labrador Retriever Awarded Britain's Highest Military Honor

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    Treo, a nine-year old Black Labrador Retriever who served in the British Army, was awarded the animal equivalent of the Victoria Cross. He’s repeatedly saved the lives of his comrades in Afghanistan:

    Now he is being rewarded with the Dickin Medal – the animal equivalent of a Victoria Cross – the highest accolade for a military animal.

    Treo is the 63rd animal to receive the Dickin Medal – introduced in 1943 to honor the work of animals in war – and the 27th dog to receive the honor.

    Since its introduction it has also been presented to 32 World War II messenger pigeons, three horses and one cat.
     
  15. hitesh

    hitesh New Member

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    Here just a few of what can only be termed the "World's Most Faithful Dogs.":


    Bobbie, the Wonder Dog
    Bobbie was a Scotch collie and English shepherd mix that managed to find his way home after getting lost on a family trip. Bobbie traveled at least 2,800 miles from Indiana to Oregon in just six months in 1923. The Braziers identified the dog upon his return by three unique scars that he obtained before he was lost. His monumental feat of faithfulness did not go unnoticed. He was featured around the world in a series of newspaper articles and in Ripley's Believe it or Not. Having won the heart of a number of people, Bobbie received hundreds of letters, ribbons, collars, and even keys to various cities. He was also given a silver medal, engraved with the record of his long-distance journey by the Oregon Humane Society.

    Bum
    This story begins not with a dog, but with a burro named Shorty. After years of service in the mines around town, Shorty turned into the "beloved town mooch" in Fairplay, Colorado. When he died, it seemed only natural to bury him on the courthouse lawn. Enter Bum. Bum was a stray and, apparently, Shorty's best friend. Bum was so broken-hearted at the loss of his friend that he laid down on Shorty's grave. For days, he refused to move or eat, no matter what the townspeople did. Finally, Bum died as well. The townspeople were so moved by this act of devotion that they buried Bum next to Shorty and resurrected a monument to the two that still stands to this day.

    Greyfriars Bobby
    Greyfriars Bobby is another dog who came to fame after his master died. John Gray died on February 8, 1858 in Edinburgh, Scotland, leaving very little behind except for a little Skye terrier named Bobby. The day after the burial, the curator noticed Bobby lying on the fresh mound of dirt. He immediately chased the little dog away, but the next day he was back. Again, the curator chased him day, but on the third day-despite the cold and the rain-Bobby was back. Finally, the curator took pity on the poor dog and allowed him to stay.

    For the next fourteen years, Bobby kept constant watch over his owner's grave, rarely leaving except to take his noontime meal at exactly one o'clock. After a while, he came to be known as Greyfriars Bobby, after the cemetery in which his master was buried.

    Bobby outlasted his master by fourteen years. When he died, he was buried just inside the gate at Greyfriars Kirkyard. He could not be buried with his master because it was consecrated ground. His headstone reads, "Greyfriars Bobby - died 14th January 1872 - aged 16 years - Let his loyalty and devotion be a lesson to us all."

    Greyfriars Bobby may be gone, but he has not been forgotten. Shortly after his passing, a statue was resurrected in his honor. His story was also passed down and eventually a fictional version of the tale was published in a book titled Greyfriars Bobby by Eleanor Atkinson. In 1961, the book was made into a movie titled Greyfriars Bobby: The True Story of a Dog. Another movie was released in 2006 titled The Adventures of Greyfriars Bobby and starred Oliver Golding and Christopher Lee.

    Delta
    Delta is just one of many victims that died near Pompeii after Mt. Vesuvius erupted in 79 A.D. Her remains were found lying across the body of a young child, a futile yet protective gesture. However, that was not Delta's only remarkable act. With her remains was found a silver collar with her name engraved on it. It also stated that her owner's name was Severinus and that she had saved his life three times. The first time was when she pulled him out of the sea when he was drowning. Then, she fought of four attackers who had attempted to rob her master. Finally, she protected him from a wolf who tried to attack him near Herculaneum. Although Delta could not save her owner from Mt. Vesuvius, it certainly didn't stop her from trying.

    Hachiko
    Hachiko (also spelled Hachik?) was an Akita who was brought to Tokyo by his owner Kidesamur? Ueno. Ueno was a professor at the University of Tokyo. Every day, Hachiko would wait at the nearby Shibuya train station for Ueno to return. Ueno died in May 1925, but that did not stop Hachiko. He returned to the train station continuously for nine years, patiently waiting for his master to return.

    About a year after Ueno's death, one of his former students spotted Hachiko during his daily vigil and, after following Hachiko home, learned about this remarkable dog. The student wrote and published several articles about Hachiko amazing loyalty to his owner. Eventually, national newspapers picked up the story and Hachiko soon became famous. He also earned the nickname "Chu-ken Hachiko" or "faithful dog Hachiko."

    In 1934, an artist erected a statue of Hachiko at Shibuya Station, and Hachiko was present for its unveiling. The statue was recycled during World War II, but later resurrected by the original artist's son in 1948. Another statue of Hachiko stands in his hometown in front of the Odate Station and a third has been erected in front of the Akita Museum in Odate.

    Hachiko finally gave his vigil when he died in 1935. His remains were stuffed and mounted and are kept at the National Science Museum in Ueno, Tokyo.

    Old Shep
    Shep was a border collie who followed his beloved master everywhere. When the man died in 1936, Shep followed the man's coffin to the train station in Fort Benton, Montana. When they refused to allow him on the train, Shep hung around the station yard and waited for his master to return. For the next six years, Shep checked every station that arrived at the station for his master. Tragically, Shep was killed by a passing train in 1942. His story was memorialized in a book titled Forever Faithful-the Story of Shep. He even has his own memorial with a large bronze sculpture of himself in a little park over looking the river.

    Heidi
    In 2001, a Jack Russell terrier named Heidi scrambled down a 500-foot drop to get to her owner, Graham Snell. Snell had fallen off the cliff while hiking and died instantly. Heidi stayed by her master's side for two days until rescue teams finally found them.

    Buddy
    Buddy is a touching story with a tragic ending. Bill Hitchcock was the sole caretaker of a remote lodge on Knight Island, Alaska. While out cutting firewood, Hitchcock was struck by a piece of timber and died. For the next two weeks, his faithful four-year-old black lab, Buddy, paced between his owner's body and the shoreline looking for help. He managed to survive the brutal February temperatures that reached -23°F before leading searchers to his owner.

    After people heard of Buddy's story, over a thousand letters, calls, and emails were sent by people hoping to adopt him. Finally, Bill's neighbors, Roger and Marilyn Stowell, decided that Jim Brewer, the mayor of the Alaska Peninsula village of Chignik would get him.

    Less than a month later, Buddy was dead. Brewer who had initially told reporters that "Buddy will just become part of our family," had had him put to sleep. According to Brewer, Buddy had difficulty transitioning to his new life and, after the dog bit him, he decided to surrender him to Anchorage Animal Control. Buddy was labeled "ineligible for adoption" and euthanized. The Stowells, who had told Brewer that he could return Buddy if it did not work out, were heartbroken as were the 999 other people who had expressed an interest in Buddy
     
  16. hitesh

    hitesh New Member

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    Loyal Dog in China Refuses to Leave Owner’s Grave


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    Lao Pan, 68, lived alone in a small house in the village of Panjiatun, China. His only companion: a yellow dog. Pan died earlier this month, and although he had no close relatives, he has been visited constantly. His lone visitor: his trusty dog.

    The dog went without eating for seven days as he watched over his owner’s grave. Only once has the dog been lured away, and it was just for a quick bite.

    “I saw the dog when I was working on the field, and I called him, and wanted to bring him back home, because I also have a dog,” a man said in an interview that ran on the BBC. “I gave him a steamed bun when he came to my home. The dog caught the bun and ran back. I caught him, but he ran even faster to the tomb, and stayed there.”
     
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  17. hitesh

    hitesh New Member

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  18. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    Maybe Param is a cat lover.

    "Cats know your every thought. They don't care, but they know."
     
  19. ganesh177

    ganesh177 Regular Member

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  20. SPIEZ

    SPIEZ Senior Member Senior Member

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    Rajapalayams are known for their bravery and ferocity.
     
  21. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

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    I Have a collection of Pics..

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